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I realize that I really need to rewrite my programs data structure (not now, but soon, as the deadline is monday), as I am currently using VST (VirtualStringTree) to store my data.

What I would like to achieve, is a Contact List structure. The Rootnodes are the Categories, and the children are the Contacts. There is a total of 2 levels.

The thing is though, that I need a contact to display in more than 1 category, but they need to be synchronized. Particularly the Checkstate.

Currently, to maintain sync, I loop thru my whole tree to find nodes that have the same ID as the one that was just changed. But doing so is very slow when there is a huge ammount of nodes.

So, I thought: Would it be possible to display one instance of the Contact Object, in multiple Categories?

Note: Honestly I am not 100% familiar with the terminology - what I mean by Instance, is one Object (or Record), so I will not have to look thru my entire tree to find Contact Objects with the same ID.

Here is an example:

Example

As you see, Todd Hirsch appears in Test Category, and in All Contacts. But behind the scenes, those are 2 PVirtualNodes, so when I change a property on one of the node's (Like CheckState), or something in the node's Data Record/Class, the 2 nodes are not synchronized. And currently the only way I can synchronize them, is to loop thru my tree, find all the nodes that house that same contact, and apply the changes to them and their data.

To summarize: What I am looking for, is a way to use one object/record, and display it in several Categories in my tree - and whenever one node gets checked, so will every other node that houses the same Contact object.

Do I make any sense here?

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1 Answer 1

Of course you can. You need to separate nodes and data in your mind. Nodes in TVirtualStringTree do not need to hold the data, the can simply be used to point to an instance where the data can be found. And of course you can point two nodes to the same object instance.

Say you have a list of TPerson's and you haev a tree where you want to show each person in different nodes. Then you declare the record you use for your nodes simply as something like:

TNodeRecord = record
  ... // anything else you may need  or want
  DataObject: TObject;
  ...
end;

In the code where the nodes are initialized, you do something like:

PNodeRecord.DataObject := PersonList[SomeIndex];

That's the gist of it. If you want a general NodeRecord, like I showed above, then you would need to cast it back to the proper class in order to use it in the various Get... methods. You can of course also make a specific record per tree, where you declare DataObject to be of the specific type of class that you display in the tree. The only drawback is that you then limit the tree to showing information for that class of objects.

I should have a more elaborate example lying around somewhere. When I find it, I'll add it to this answer.


Example

Declare a record to be used by the tree:

RTreeData = record
  CDO: TCustomDomainObject;
end;
PTreeData = ^RTreeData;

TCustomDomainObject is my base class for all domain information. It is declared as:

TCustomDomainObject = class(TObject)
private
  FList: TObjectList;
protected
  function GetDisplayString: string; virtual;
  function GetCount: Cardinal;
  function GetCDO(aIdx: Cardinal): TCustomDomainObject;
public
  constructor Create; overload;
  destructor Destroy; override;

  function Add(aCDO: TCustomDomainObject): TCustomDomainObject;

  property DisplayString: string read GetDisplayString;
  property Count: Cardinal read GetCount;
  property CDO[aIdx: Cardinal]: TCustomDomainObject read GetCDO;
end;

Please note that this class is set up to be able to hold a list of other TCustomDomainObject instances. On the form which shows your tree you add:

TForm1 = class(TForm)
  ...
private
  FIsLoading: Boolean;
  FCDO: TCustomDomainObject;
protected
  procedure ShowColumnHeaders;
  procedure ShowDomainObject(aCDO, aParent: TCustomDomainObject);
  procedure ShowDomainObjects(aCDO, aParent: TCustomDomainObject);

  procedure AddColumnHeaders(aColumns: TVirtualTreeColumns); virtual;
  function GetColumnText(aCDO: TCustomDomainObject; aColumn: TColumnIndex;
    var aCellText: string): Boolean;
protected
  property CDO: TCustomDomainObject read FCDO write FCDO;
public
  procedure Load(aCDO: TCustomDomainObject);
  ...
end;  

The Load method is where it all starts:

procedure TForm1.Load(aCDO: TCustomDomainObject);
begin
  FIsLoading := True;
  VirtualStringTree1.BeginUpdate;
  try
    if Assigned(CDO) then begin
      VirtualStringTree1.Header.Columns.Clear;
      VirtualStringTree1.Clear;
    end;
    CDO := aCDO;
    if Assigned(CDO) then begin
      ShowColumnHeaders;
      ShowDomainObjects(CDO, nil);
    end;
  finally
    VirtualStringTree1.EndUpdate;
    FIsLoading := False;
  end;
end;

All it really does is clear the form and set it up for a new CustomDomainObject which in most cases would be a list containing other CustomDomainObjects.

The ShowColumnHeaders method sets up the column headers for the string tree and adjusts the header options according to the number of columns:

procedure TForm1.ShowColumnHeaders;
begin
  AddColumnHeaders(VirtualStringTree1.Header.Columns);
  if VirtualStringTree1.Header.Columns.Count > 0 then begin
    VirtualStringTree1.Header.Options := VirtualStringTree1.Header.Options
      + [hoVisible];
  end;
end;

procedure TForm1.AddColumnHeaders(aColumns: TVirtualTreeColumns);
var
  Col: TVirtualTreeColumn;
begin
  Col := aColumns.Add;
  Col.Text := 'Breed(Group)';
  Col.Width := 200;

  Col := aColumns.Add;
  Col.Text := 'Average Age';
  Col.Width := 100;
  Col.Alignment := taRightJustify;

  Col := aColumns.Add;
  Col.Text := 'CDO.Count';
  Col.Width := 100;
  Col.Alignment := taRightJustify;
end;

AddColumnHeaders was separated out to allow this form to be used as a base for other forms showing information in a tree.

The ShowDomainObjects looks like the method where the whole tree will be loaded. It isn't. We are dealing with a virtual tree after all. So all we need to do is tell the virtual tree how many nodes we have:

procedure TForm1.ShowDomainObjects(aCDO, aParent: TCustomDomainObject);
begin
  if Assigned(aCDO) then begin
    VirtualStringTree1.RootNodeCount := aCDO.Count;
  end else begin
    VirtualStringTree1.RootNodeCount := 0;
  end;
end;

We are now mostly set up and only need to implement the various VirtualStringTree events to get everything going. The first event to implement is the OnGetText event:

procedure TForm1.VirtualStringTree1GetText(Sender: TBaseVirtualTree; Node:
    PVirtualNode; Column: TColumnIndex; TextType: TVSTTextType; var CellText:
    string);
var
  NodeData: ^RTreeData;
begin
  NodeData := Sender.GetNodeData(Node);
  if GetColumnText(NodeData.CDO, Column, {var}CellText) then
  else begin
    if Assigned(NodeData.CDO) then begin
      case Column of
        -1, 0: CellText := NodeData.CDO.DisplayString;
      end;
    end;
  end;
end;

It gets the NodeData from the VirtualStringTree and used the obtained CustomDomainObject instance to get its text. It uses the GetColumnText function for this and that was done, again, to allow for using this form as a base for other forms showing trees. When you go that route, you would declare this method virtual and override it in any descendant forms. In this example it is simply implemented as:

function TForm1.GetColumnText(aCDO: TCustomDomainObject; aColumn: TColumnIndex;
  var aCellText: string): Boolean;
begin
  if Assigned(aCDO) then begin
    case aColumn of
      -1, 0: begin
        aCellText := aCDO.DisplayString;
      end;
      1: begin
        if aCDO.InheritsFrom(TDogBreed) then begin
          aCellText := IntToStr(TDogBreed(aCDO).AverageAge);
        end;
      end;
      2: begin
        aCellText := IntToStr(aCDO.Count);
      end;
    else
//      aCellText := '';
    end;
    Result := True;
  end else begin
    Result := False;
  end;
end;

Now that we have told the VirtualStringTree how to use the CustomDomainObject instance from its node record, we of course still need to link the instances in the main CDO to the nodes in the tree. That is done in the OnInitNode event:

procedure TForm1.VirtualStringTree1InitNode(Sender: TBaseVirtualTree;
    ParentNode, Node: PVirtualNode; var InitialStates: TVirtualNodeInitStates);
var
  ParentNodeData: ^RTreeData;
  ParentNodeCDO: TCustomDomainObject;
  NodeData: ^RTreeData;
begin
  if Assigned(ParentNode) then begin
    ParentNodeData := VirtualStringTree1.GetNodeData(ParentNode);
    ParentNodeCDO := ParentNodeData.CDO;
  end else begin
    ParentNodeCDO := CDO;
  end;

  NodeData := VirtualStringTree1.GetNodeData(Node);
  if Assigned(NodeData.CDO) then begin
    // CDO was already set, for example when added through AddDomainObject.
  end else begin
    if Assigned(ParentNodeCDO) then begin
      if ParentNodeCDO.Count > Node.Index then begin
        NodeData.CDO := ParentNodeCDO.CDO[Node.Index];
        if NodeData.CDO.Count > 0 then begin
          InitialStates := InitialStates + [ivsHasChildren];
        end;
      end;
    end;
  end;
  Sender.CheckState[Node] := csUncheckedNormal;
end;

As our CustomDomainObject can have a list of other CustomDomainObjects, we also set the InitialStates of the node to include HasChildren when the Count of the lsit is greater than zero. This means that we also need to implement the OnInitChildren event, which is called when the user clicks on a plus sign in the tree. Again, all we need to do there is tell the tree for how many nodes it needs to prepare:

procedure TForm1.VirtualStringTree1InitChildren(Sender: TBaseVirtualTree; Node:
    PVirtualNode; var ChildCount: Cardinal);
var
  NodeData: ^RTreeData;
begin
  ChildCount := 0;

  NodeData := Sender.GetNodeData(Node);
  if Assigned(NodeData.CDO) then begin
    ChildCount := NodeData.CDO.Count;
  end;
end;

That's all folks!!!

As I have shown an example with a simple list, you still need to figure out which data instances you need to link to which nodes, but you should have a fair idea now of where you need to do that: the OnInitNode event where you set the CDO member of the node record to point to the CDO instance of your choice.

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I really feel like an a-hole when saying this: I am not sure I understand this concept. I have looked over the code, tried to implement it, but I get a mental block. :P –  Jeff Apr 9 '11 at 23:02
    
@Jeff: The concept of a virtual tree is that you do not copy values from your data structure into the tree. The tree asks you for the values when it needs to paint something. Just bear in mind that it will ask for information with just about every mouse move and methods telling the tree what to paint (ie OnGetText) get called incredibly often and need to be implemented with that in mind. If that doesn't unblock you, the TVirtualStringTree documentation actually has pretty good information on the concept. It's one of those controls where you really need to read the manual before diving in. –  Marjan Venema Apr 10 '11 at 6:30
    
@Marjan - The documentation I got is using PVirtualNode to store the data in, AFAIK. I do get the concept, it's just implementing it is where I am lost. The Demo's for VT are not understandable (for me). –  Jeff Apr 10 '11 at 11:06
    
@Marjan - and in your example, aren't you storing the CDO object in the node's data? –  Jeff Apr 10 '11 at 11:19
    
@Jeff: I only store a pointer to the CDO instance in my tree node. Nothing is copied into the tree node. In Delphi class instances (object's) are pointers. When you code something like MyDog := TDog(List[i]); you are not copying all data contained in the dog instance, you are only copying a pointer to that instance. That is where any virtual control differs from non-virtual controls. If you were to use an ordinary TListView, you would be copying strings like the dog's name to the ListItem and its subitems for each and every dog. Thereby duplicating the string in memory. And when... (cont.) –  Marjan Venema Apr 10 '11 at 18:20

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