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I writing a server and a client and keep getting 'bind: Socket operation on non-socket'.

I've researched the heck out of this, have other code that runs in another application and have exhausted 8 hours trying to find this bug.

The code is:

void TCPSocket::buildTCPSocket(int port)
{
    initializeSocket1();
    getSocket();
    bindSocket();
    listenToSocket();
    acceptSocket();
         // now you can send() and recv() with the
        // connected client via socket connectedTCPSocket
}

void TCPSocket::getSocket()
{
        // Get an internet domain socket AF_INET
    if(socket1 = socket(AF_INET, SOCK_STREAM,0) == -1)
    {
        perror("socket");
        exit(1);
    }    
}


void TCPSocket::bindSocket()
{
  // Bind to a port on the host
    int myAddressSize = sizeof(myAddress);
    int bindReturnValue = bind(socket1, (struct sockaddr *) &myAddress, AddressSize);
    if (bindReturnValue == -1)
    {
        perror("bind");  // <== Error message generated here
        exit(1);
    }
    printf("Socket for TCP bound to port %d\n", port);    
}

Also, prior to this, I memset the memory block with this function.

void TCPSocket::initializeSocket1()
{
    // Fill tcpSocket struct with 0's

    memset(&myAddress, '\0', sizeof(myAddress));
    myAddress.sin_family = AF_INET;
    myAddress.sin_addr.s_addr = INADDR_ANY;
   // Conver PORT to big-endian if necessary
    myAddress.sin_port = htons(this->port);
}

Variables are declared in the header file of the class.

public:
    struct sockaddr_in myAddress, clientAddress;

    void buildTCPSocket(int newPort);

private:
    int port;
    int socket1, socket2;

    socklen_t clientAddressLength;

-- Edit the code should be a little more clear now. socket1 is initialized in getSocket().

I've seen where a bunch of guys have missed the parens in the if but I think I eliminated that error by declaring myAddressSize and bindReturnValue.

Any input is appreciated.
Thank you, Ted S

Ok, problem solved. Of course the problem is never where you are looking are you would have found it. Here is the corrected code. The problem was in a missing set of parens in the call to socket().

void TCPSocket::getSocket()
{
        // Get an internet domain socket AF_INET
    if((socket1 = socket(AF_INET, SOCK_STREAM,0)) == -1)
    {
        perror("socket");
        exit(1);
    }    
}

Thanks again!

share|improve this question
    
What do you initialize socket1 to? That's where your problem is. –  Mike Bantegui Apr 9 '11 at 1:32
    
Thanks for answering so quickly. I'm not sure how to include code again, but here is more complete code. void TCPSocket::buildTCPSocket(int port) { initializeSocket1(); getSocket(); bindSocket(); listenToSocket(); acceptSocket(); // now you can send() and recv() with the // connected client via socket connectedTCPSocket } –  Ted Spradley Apr 9 '11 at 1:41
    
Just hit the "edit" button on your post. Also, that helps very little. I'm wondering more about where you actually do something with socket1. More specifically, can you edit your question to include getSocket()? –  Mike Bantegui Apr 9 '11 at 1:43
    
Ok, so stupid question but I have to ask - you call socket() somewhere, right? –  Duck Apr 9 '11 at 1:46
    
When you insert new code snippets, highlight the code you've added and hit the curly braces button so it indents properly. Otherwise, your code will show unformatted in your question. –  Mike Bantegui Apr 9 '11 at 1:47

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

I can almost guarantee you that you're getting that error because you never initialized socket1.

Typically you have to do something like this:

 int socket1 = socket(AF_INET, SOCK_STREAM, 0);
 bind(socket1, ...);

I don't see any code anywhere in there for setting up socket1. This is what the error message is telling you, after all. socket1 isn't a socket, so it's failing.

Edit: As a follow up, this is one of the reasons why I try to avoid using the syntax

if ((foo = bar()) == ERROR)
{
   // handle me
}

And instead stick with:

void TCPSocket::getSocket()
{
        // Get an internet domain socket AF_INET
    socket1 = socket(AF_INET, SOCK_STREAM, 0);
    if (socket == -1)
    {
        perror("socket");
        exit(1);
    }    
}
share|improve this answer
    
Well, you are so right. The call to if(socket1 = socket(AF_INET, SOCK_STREAM,0) == -1) in getSocket() was missing a paren set. I'll post the correct code on an edit to get the correct formatting. Thanks so much to all of you. Arrggghh. The wasted time. Cheers. –  Ted Spradley Apr 9 '11 at 1:58
    
This is precisely why I don't like using that feature of C++. It saves a line, but I find it more readable and far less error prone to put the initialization and error check on two separate lines. –  Mike Bantegui Apr 9 '11 at 2:04
    
Thanks Mike. A hard lesson learned, but learned nonetheless. –  Ted Spradley Apr 9 '11 at 2:16
    
@Ted: Not a problem. Welcome to the site! –  Mike Bantegui Apr 9 '11 at 2:18

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