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Here is a code to find the total ways to get 87 with 4 different bills. I'm wondering how to change this to get the least amount of bills (4-twenties, 1-five, 2-ones) instead of every single way. Any help would be appreciated.

int target = 87;
int[] dollarSizes = { 1, 5, 10, 20 };
int[] ways = new int[target+1];
ways[0] = 1;

for (int i = 0; i < dollarSizes.Length; i++) {
    for (int j = dollarSizes[i]; j <= target; j++) {
        ways[j] += ways[j - dollarSizes[i]];
    }
}
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One way would to keep track of how many bills you had to use to reach $87 in an array. Then, you can simply look for the smallest number in that array and it will be your minimum number of bills required. –  Mike Bantegui Apr 9 '11 at 1:53
    
Homework? Seems like something my son would have as a question. –  Tim Meers Apr 9 '11 at 1:59
    
Also, note that there is a legal $2 bill. –  Cade Roux Apr 9 '11 at 2:11
    
@CadeRoux that would be in the requirements I'm sure ;) like ... the ones the professor gave out –  jcolebrand Apr 9 '11 at 2:25
    
@drachenstern Everything would be so much easier in galleons, sickles and knuts. –  Cade Roux Apr 9 '11 at 2:33

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted
        int target = 87;
        int[] dollarSizes = { 100, 20, 10, 5, 1 };
        int[] counts = { 0, 0, 0, 0, 0 };

        int remainder = target;
        int bill = 0;
        while (remainder > 0)
        {
            counts[bill] = remainder / dollarSizes[bill];
            remainder -= counts[bill] * dollarSizes[bill];
            bill++;
        }
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Really what you want to track is how quickly you can get to the target. So given 20,10,5,1 denominations, the code looks like this in psuedo

int initial = 87;             initial  twenties  tens   fives   ones
int twenties = initial / 20;    87        4
initial = initial % 20;          7        4    
int tens = initial / 10;         7        4       0
initial = initial % 10;          7        4       0
int fives = initial / 5;         7        4       0       1
initial = initial % 5;           2        4       0       1
int ones = initial;              2        4       0       1       2

As you can see, there's a lot of repeated logic, so that can be fed from a loop (where we start with the largest value).

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I was going to use mod, but when I started testing, I totally forgot. Awesome solution :) –  Christopher Harris Apr 9 '11 at 2:06
    
Seeing as though this looks homework-ish I'm glad you didn't give them the exact answer... –  Reddog Apr 9 '11 at 2:06
    
I would suggest renaming initial to perhaps remaining. It is confusing that initial is no longer the initial value in the end. remaining makes it much clearer. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Apr 9 '11 at 2:23
    
@Reddog I figured giving him loops would be too much. All I really did was use the same logic a child should've known ;) –  jcolebrand Apr 9 '11 at 2:23
1  
@drachenstein: Rather badly: 87 % 20 is 7, not 4. –  Ben Voigt Apr 9 '11 at 12:51

Count up using the highest bills first. If the new amount is too large, don't add that bill, and move on to the next dollar size:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var target = 87;
        var current = 0;
        var dollarSizes = new[] { 1, 5, 10, 20 }.OrderByDescending(x => x); // just make sure they're descending.
        var bestWay = new List<int>();

        foreach (var dollarSize in dollarSizes)
        {
            while (current + dollarSize <= target)
            {
                current += dollarSize;
                bestWay.Add(dollarSize);
            }

            if (current == target)
                break;
        }

        foreach (var dollar in bestWay)
        {
            Console.Write("{0}, ", dollar);
        }

        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}
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