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I have :

class fruit
{
}

class apple:fruit
{
}

class pear:fruit
{
}

I want to create a function "addFriut" to add fruit into a vector of friut. like:

vector<fruit> fruits;

How can I do it? Thanks a lot!

edited: I tried put a virtual function in base class. and do the really operation in subclass. But it failed. I got a lot of errors. SO I just need a clear thoughts and example code snippet. Thanks

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3  
Studying some C++ fundamentals might help: stackoverflow.com/questions/388242/… –  Fred Larson Apr 9 '11 at 2:13
2  
"I tried", "it failed", and "I got a lot of errors" is no information. Show us what "I tried" looks like in code, and tell us how "it failed" and what "a lot of errors" were, and we can maybe help fix it. Otherwise, it's not a real question. (If you didn't have 100+ questions, I'd think you were looking for homework help - maybe you are?) –  Ken White Apr 9 '11 at 2:35

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

To properly use inheritance you'd want to do something like this:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

class Fruit
{
public:
    virtual void Eat()
    {
        std::cout << "Mmm.. a fruit!" << std::endl;
    }
    virtual ~Fruit() {}
};

class Apple : public Fruit
{
public:
    void Eat()
    {
        std::cout << "Mmm.. an apple!" << std::endl;
    }
};

class Pear : public Fruit
{
public:
    void Eat()
    {
        std::cout << "Mmm.. a pear!" << std::endl;
    }
};

int main()
{
    std::vector<Fruit *> fruits;
    fruits.push_back(new Pear());
    fruits.push_back(new Apple());
    fruits.push_back(new Fruit());

    for (int i = 0; i < fruits.size(); i++)
        fruits[i]->Eat();

    return 0;
}

You need to use pointers to the base class (Fruit *) in order to take advantage of dynamic dispatch. Otherwise, it'll just call the Eat() method of Fruit.

The example in my answer allows for classes that derive from Fruit to override Eat() if they want, but it's not necessary. If you make the virtual function pure, then derived classes must implement it.

class Fruit
{
public:
    // Cannot instantiate this class, and derived classes must provide this
    virtual void Eat() = 0; 
};

Going off of Donotalo's comment, the functionality you want can be implemented as:

class FruitCollection
{
private:
    std::vector<Fruit *> fruits;

public:
    void Add(Fruit *fruit);
};

void FruitCollection::Add(Fruit *fruit)
{
    fruits.push_back(fruit);
}

This is probably overkill in most circumstances, and you'll probably need far more operations than this extremely simple example.

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i need a function about addFruit. How can I do this?? –  Josh Morrison Apr 9 '11 at 2:20
    
@Josh: What exactly are you trying to accomplish? Your question is rather vague. –  Mike Bantegui Apr 9 '11 at 2:21
    
I want a function. this function like addFruit(). It can be called in main(). the functionality is push back those fruit into vector. –  Josh Morrison Apr 9 '11 at 2:25
    
The function you're asking for is one line.. All it is, is v.push_back(fruit); –  Mike Bantegui Apr 9 '11 at 2:27
    
@Josh, more OO approach would be to create a FruitBasket class which will contain addFruit() and also will encapsulate vector<Fruit*>. Savvy? –  Donotalo Apr 9 '11 at 2:42

Hmmmm.....

vector<fruit*> fruits;

fruits.push_back(new apple());
fruits.push_back(new pear());

etc? is that what you are looking for?

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I am not sure. Let me try it first. –  Josh Morrison Apr 9 '11 at 2:10
    
I think I need a function. It should can be called in main. –  Josh Morrison Apr 9 '11 at 2:11
    
It should be called in main? How is that at all relevant. –  dcousens Apr 9 '11 at 3:09
    
the implementation should use some form of auto pointer –  justin Apr 9 '11 at 6:43

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