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<xsl:template match="location">
        <xsl:if test="not(preceding::location)">
            <table>
                <tr>
                    <th>Name</th>
                    <th>City</th>
                    <th>State</th>
                    <th>Zip Code</th>
                    <th>Country</th>
                </tr>
        </xsl:if>
        <tr>
            <td><xsl:value-of select=".//name"/></td>
            <td><xsl:value-of select=".//city"/></td>
            <td><xsl:value-of select=".//state"/></td>
            <td><xsl:value-of select=".//zip"/></td>
            <td><xsl:value-of select=".//countdy"/></td>
        </tr>
        <xsl:if test="not(following::location)">
            </table>
        </xsl:if>
    </xsl:template>

Is the any way to allow mismatched tags in XSLT... or is there another way to achieve the same desired effect?

share|improve this question
    
possible duplicate of XSLT: opening but not closing tags – user357812 Apr 9 '11 at 14:07
    
And also stackoverflow.com/questions/3701708/…, and stackoverflow.com/questions/2202377/…;, and ... – user357812 Apr 9 '11 at 14:16
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Like Dimitre said, there is no way to allow mismatched tags in XSLT. There shouldn't be a reason to have mismatched tags though.

Looking at your template, it looks like you're trying to build an html table out of all the <location> elements of your XML instance. You're trying to open the table at the first <location> and trying to close the table at the last <location>.

The easiest way to do this is to open your table at a higher level (parent/ancestor) and then populate the table with the <location> data.

Here's a sample XML file that has 3 <location>s:

<doc>
  <location>
    <name>name 1</name>
    <city>city 1</city>
    <state>state 1</state>
    <zip>zip 1</zip>
    <country>country 1</country>
  </location>
  <location>
    <name>name 2</name>
    <city>city 2</city>
    <state>state 2</state>
    <zip>zip 2</zip>
    <country>country 2</country>
  </location>
  <location>
    <name>name 3</name>
    <city>city 3</city>
    <state>state 3</state>
    <zip>zip 3</zip>
    <country>country 3</country>
  </location>
</doc>

Here's a stylesheet that will create the table:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
  <xsl:output indent="yes"/>
  <xsl:strip-space elements="*"/>

  <xsl:template match="doc">
    <!--The table is inserted here.-->
    <table>
      <tr>
        <th>Name</th>
        <th>City</th>
        <th>State</th>
        <th>Zip Code</th>
        <th>Country</th>
      </tr>
      <!--This is where we apply the templates to populate the rows.-->
      <xsl:apply-templates select="location"/>
    </table>
  </xsl:template>

  <!--This template populates the row(s).-->
  <xsl:template match="location">
    <tr>
      <td>
        <xsl:value-of select="name"/>
      </td>
      <td>
        <xsl:value-of select="city"/>
      </td>
      <td>
        <xsl:value-of select="state"/>
      </td>
      <td>
        <xsl:value-of select="zip"/>
      </td>
      <td>
        <xsl:value-of select="country"/>
      </td>
    </tr>
  </xsl:template>

</xsl:stylesheet>

This is the output:

<table>
   <tr>
      <th>Name</th>
      <th>City</th>
      <th>State</th>
      <th>Zip Code</th>
      <th>Country</th>
   </tr>
   <tr>
      <td>name 1</td>
      <td>city 1</td>
      <td>state 1</td>
      <td>zip 1</td>
      <td>country 1</td>
   </tr>
   <tr>
      <td>name 2</td>
      <td>city 2</td>
      <td>state 2</td>
      <td>zip 2</td>
      <td>country 2</td>
   </tr>
   <tr>
      <td>name 3</td>
      <td>city 3</td>
      <td>state 3</td>
      <td>zip 3</td>
      <td>country 3</td>
   </tr>
</table>

If for some reason you needed to create the <table> at the first <location>, you could still do that. It would require more code though.

The following stylesheet produces the same output as the first stylesheet:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
  <xsl:output indent="yes"/>
  <xsl:strip-space elements="*"/>

  <xsl:template match="/doc">
    <xsl:apply-templates/>
  </xsl:template>

  <!--The table is created at the first location and
    the first row is populated.-->
  <xsl:template match="location[1]">
    <table>
      <tr>
        <th>Name</th>
        <th>City</th>
        <th>State</th>
        <th>Zip Code</th>
        <th>Country</th>
      </tr>
      <xsl:call-template name="location-row"/>
      <!--Here is where we apply the other template to populate the other rows.
        Notice we use a "mode" to differentiate the template from the generic
        "location" template.-->
      <xsl:apply-templates select="following-sibling::location" mode="not-first"/>
    </table>
  </xsl:template>

  <!--This template will output the other rows.-->
  <xsl:template match="location" mode="not-first" name="location-row">
    <tr>
      <td>
        <xsl:value-of select="name"/>
      </td>
      <td>
        <xsl:value-of select="city"/>
      </td>
      <td>
        <xsl:value-of select="state"/>
      </td>
      <td>
        <xsl:value-of select="zip"/>
      </td>
      <td>
        <xsl:value-of select="country"/>
      </td>
    </tr>
  </xsl:template>

  <!--This generic template matches locations other than the first one. 
    Basically it is consuming it so we don't get duplicate output.--> 
  <xsl:template match="location"/>

</xsl:stylesheet>
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Two correct approaches. Do note that content template of first location rule is duplicating content template of location on not-first mode rule. This is the right place for a xsl:call-template instruction. – user357812 Apr 9 '11 at 14:02
    
@Alejandro: Excellent observation. This simplifies the second example a lot. I knew I'd miss something answering a question at 3am. Thanks again! – Daniel Haley Apr 9 '11 at 18:21

Is the any way to allow mismatched tags in XSLT

No.

An XSLT stylesheet must be a well-formed XML document.

Also, if the value of the method attribute of <xsl:output> is specified as "xml", then the output will always be a well-formed XML fragment (or document).

... or is there another way to achieve the same desired effect?

If you define the problem you want to solve, many people will be able to show you a solution, that doesn't require malformed XSLT.

share|improve this answer

Remember that XSLT builds a tree - an element node in the stylesheet is an indivisible instruction to write an indivisible element node to the result tree; you mustn't think of the start tag in the stylesheet being an instruction to write a start tag to the output, and the end tag in the stylesheet being an instruction to write an end tag to the output.

Usually when we see this kind of thing (and most of us tried it when we started out with the language) it's an attempt to do grouping in the way you would do it with a procedural language that writes XML as text. You need to get into the XSLT mindset, and in particular to think of XML as a tree.

share|improve this answer

A simplified version of the problem, which I think is a common problem. (I was inspired by the advice to not approach XSLT as a procedural language, having previously solved it just that way, using brute force.)

Basically, I want to bracket lines of code with the PRE tag, for HTML output, and the first line of code had a unique style:

<xsl:variable name="new_line" select="'&#xA;'"/>

<xsl:template match="//text:p[@text:style-name='Code_20_Block_20_Beg']">
    <PRE>
    <xsl:for-each select="//text:p[@text:style-name='Code_20_Block']">
<xsl:apply-templates/><xsl:value-of select="$new_line"/>
    </xsl:for-each>
    </PRE>
</xsl:template>


<xsl:template match="//text:p[@text:style-name='Code_20_Block']">
</xsl:template>

I had to use an empty template (at the end) to ignore 'Code_20_Block' lines that were already handled by the for-each loop. Maybe there's a better solution for this.

share|improve this answer

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