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I have mainly c++ background and I am learning c# so I need to help with c# idioms and style.

I am trying to write, in c#, a quite small text file parsing method in which i need a simple state variable with three states. In C++ I would declare enum for the state variable:

enum { stHeader, stBody, stFooter} state = stBody;

and then use it in my parsing loop like this:

if (state == stHeader && input == ".endheader")
{
  state = stBody;
}

In C# it is not possible to declare enums inside methods. What I am supposed to do for sake of clean style? Declare this internal enum outside the method? Use magic numbers 1,2,3? Create a separate class for this?

I am confused.

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Maybe i'm missing something but what's the point of an enum if it's used in a single method only? –  Doggett Apr 9 '11 at 9:03
    
@Dogget - give readable names to states.Otherwise I would have to write if (state == 2 && input == ".endheader") state = 1; –  danatel Apr 9 '11 at 9:07
1  
Self-annotation of state etc. It's very common practice in C, ie in the example given - to have state as something more meaningful than an int. It comes up less often in C# I have to say - primarily because you tend to break methods down into smaller components, objects etc, rather than C which is far more imperative orientated. Or C++ when it's used similar to C for that matter. –  Mania Apr 9 '11 at 9:08

3 Answers 3

up vote 12 down vote accepted

The closest you can get is a private nested enum with in the class:

public class TheClass
{
    private enum TheEnum 
    {
       stHeader, 
       stBody, 
       stFooter
    }

    // ...the rest of the methods properties etc... 
}
share|improve this answer
1  
This is perverted because the states have absolute no meaning outside the method. It is like declaring loop variables outside the method. Moreover, you need to give it a name! –  danatel Apr 9 '11 at 8:53
2  
Welcome to the world of conservative enterprise languages. It could be worse though, it could be java :D –  Matt Greer Apr 9 '11 at 8:54
    
@danatel: I don't make the rules :) –  Willem van Rumpt Apr 9 '11 at 8:56
    
@willem van Rumpt. Thanks for the answer. For me, declaring three independent consts (const int stHeader=0; ) looks like lesser evil. –  danatel Apr 9 '11 at 9:10
    
@danatel: I would've gone for the enumeration myself, but essentially, it boils down to the same thing :) –  Willem van Rumpt Apr 9 '11 at 9:12

You can also use the constant variables but I prefer and I think is better code style to use Enums

 public class Class1
{
    private enum TheEnum
    {
        stHeader,
        stBody,
        stFooter
    }
    public void SomeMethodEnum()
    {
        TheEnum state = TheEnum.stBody;
        switch (state)
        {
            case TheEnum.stHeader:
                //do something
                break;
            case TheEnum.stBody:
                break;
            case TheEnum.stFooter:
                break;
            default:
                throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException();
        }
    }


    public void SomeMethodConst()
    {
        int state = 1;
        const int Header = 1;
        const int Body = 2;
        const int Footer = 3;

        switch (state)
        {
            case Header:
                break;
            case Body:
                break;
            case Footer:
                break;
            default:
                throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException();
        }

    }
}
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It is not allowed to define an enum inside of a method. It must be defined out the method.

OK:

public class MyClass
{
    enum MyEnum {State1, State2}

    void MyMethod()
    {
        MyEnum enumState = MyEnum.Sate1;
    }
}

WRONG:

public class MyClass
{
    void MyMethod()
    {
        enum MyEnum {State1, State2}
        MyEnum enumState = MyEnum.Sate1;
    }
}
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