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Can anyone help me with a Count extension method for IEnumerable (non generic interface).

I know it is not supported in LINQ but how to write it manually?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 26 down vote accepted
yourEnumerable.Cast<object>().Count()

To the comment about performance:

I think this is a good example of premature optimization but here you go:

static class EnumerableExtensions
{
    public static int Count(this IEnumerable source)
    {
        int res = 0;

        foreach (var item in source)
            res++;

        return res;
    }
}
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OK, good but I think it's a bit heavy, isn't it? –  Homam Apr 9 '11 at 9:43
    
See the edited answer :) –  Lasse Espeholt Apr 9 '11 at 9:46
1  
@Daniel's answer that checks for ICollection is better, for what it is worth... –  Marc Gravell Apr 9 '11 at 11:48
    
@Marc The first .Cast<object>().Count() already makes that check (generic and non-generic). But yes, the second solution could be improved by checks. –  Lasse Espeholt Apr 9 '11 at 11:57
    
I meant the second one, sorry if that wasn't clear –  Marc Gravell Apr 9 '11 at 12:00

The simplest form would be:

public static int Count(this IEnumerable source)
{
    int c = 0;
    using (var e = source.GetEnumerator())
    {
        while (e.MoveNext())
            c++;
    }
    return c;
}

You can then improve on this by querying for ICollection:

public static int Count(this IEnumerable source)
{
    var col = source as ICollection;
    if (col != null)
        return col.Count;

    int c = 0;
    using (var e = source.GetEnumerator())
    {
        while (e.MoveNext())
            c++;
    }
    return c;
}

Update

As Gerard points out in the comments, non-generic IEnumerable does not inherit IDisposable so the normal using statement won't work. It is probably still important to attempt to dispose of such enumerators if possible - an iterator method implements IEnumerable and so may be passed indirectly to this Count method. Internally, that iterator method will be depending on a call to Dispose to trigger its own try/finally and using statements.

To make this easy in other circumstances too, you can make your own version of the using statement that is less fussy at compile time:

public static void DynamicUsing(object resource, Action action)
{
    try
    {
        action();
    }
    finally
    {
        IDisposable d = resource as IDisposable;
        if (d != null)
            d.Dispose();
    }
}

And the updated Count method would then be:

public static int Count(this IEnumerable source) 
{
    var col = source as ICollection; 
    if (col != null)
        return col.Count; 

    int c = 0;
    var e = source.GetEnumerator();
    DynamicUsing(e, () =>
    {
        while (e.MoveNext())
            c++;
    });

    return c;
}
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1  
"querying for IList" - or querying for it's base interface ICollection –  Joe Apr 9 '11 at 10:11
    
@Joe - good point, thanks. –  Daniel Earwicker Apr 9 '11 at 10:52
1  
I tried out this extension, the using gives a compile error for System.Collections.IEnumerable. I changed the code to Count<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source) which compiles. –  Gerard May 13 '11 at 9:20

Different types of IEnumerable have different optimal methods for determining count; unfortunately, there's no general-purpose means of knowing which method will be best for any given IEnumerable, nor is there even any standard means by which an IEmumerable can indicate which of the following techniques is best:

  1. Simply ask the object directly. Some types of objects that support IEnumerable, such as Array, List and Collection, have properties which can directly report the number of elements in them.
  2. Enumerate all items, discarding them, and count the number of items enumerated.
  3. Enumerate all items into a list, and then use the list if it's necessary to use the enumeration again.

Each of the above will be optimal in different cases.

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+1, Nice, thanks :) –  Homam Apr 10 '11 at 8:10
IEnumerable<DataRow> results = from resultsRow in myDataTable.AsEnumerable()
                                               where resultsRow.Field<string>("strParentAccountID") == objReport.AccountID
                                               select resultsRow;

results .ToList().Count
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2  
What does the where have to do with this question? Why are you calling ToList() on the result? What's myDataTable? It's certainly not IEnumerable, which is what this question is about. –  svick Feb 10 '13 at 14:01

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