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I am trying loop over an array and return a value as shown below. But this gives me an error on the line after the if statement. It says "This expression was expected to have type unit but has type int"

let findMostSignificantBitPosition (inputBits:System.Collections.BitArray) =
for i = inputBits.Length - 1 to 0  do
    if inputBits.[i] then
        i
done

How would I do this? I am in the middle of recoding this with a recursive loop, as it seems to be the more accepted way of doing such loops in functional languages, but I still want to know what I was doing wrong above.

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I posted code samples. Feel free to ask further clarifications. –  gasche Apr 9 '11 at 12:33

6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

for loops are not supposed to return values, they only do an operation a fixed number of times then return () (unit). If you want to iterate and finally return something, you may :

  • have outside the loop a reference where you put the final result when you get it, then after the loop return the reference content

  • use a recursive function directly

  • use a higher-order function that will encapsulate the traversal for you, and let you concentrate on the application logic

The higher-function is nice if your data structure supports it. Simple traversal functions such as fold_left, however, don't support stopping the iteration prematurely. If you wish to support this (and clearly it would be interesting in your use case), you must use a traversal with premature exit support. For easy functions such as yours, a simple recursive function is probably the simplest.

In F# it should also be possible to write your function in imperative style, using yield to turn it into a generator, then finally forcing the generator to get the result. This could be seen as a counterpart of the OCaml technique of using an exception to jump out of the loop.

Edit: A nice solution to avoid the "premature stop" questions is to use a lazy intermediate data structure, which will only be built up to the first satisfying result. This is elegant and good scripting style, but still less efficient than direct exit support or simple recursion. I guess it depends on your needs; is this function to be used in a critical path?

Edit: following are some code sample. They're OCaml and the data structures are different (some of them use libraries from Batteries), but the ideas are the same.

(* using a reference as accumulator *)
let most_significant_bit input_bits =
  let result = ref None in
  for i = Array.length input_bits - 1 downto 0 do
    if input_bits.(i) then
      if !result = None then
        result := Some i
  done;
  !result

let most_significant_bit input_bits =
  let result = ref None in
  for i = 0 to Array.length input_bits - 1 do
    if input_bits.(i) then
      (* only the last one will be kept *)
      result := Some i
  done;
  !result

(* simple recursive version *)
let most_significant_bit input_bits =
  let rec loop = function
    | -1 -> None
    | i ->
      if input_bits.(i) then Some i
      else loop (i - 1)
  in
  loop (Array.length input_bits - 1)

(* higher-order traversal *)
open Batteries_uni
let most_significant_bit input_bits =
  Array.fold_lefti
    (fun result i ->
      if input_bits.(i) && result = None then Some i else result)
    None input_bits

(* traversal using an intermediate lazy data structure 
   (a --- b) is the decreasing enumeration of integers in [b; a] *)
open Batteries_uni
let most_significant_bit input_bits =
  (Array.length input_bits - 1) --- 0
  |> Enum.Exceptionless.find (fun i -> input_bits.(i))

(* using an exception to break out of the loop; if I understand
   correctly, exceptions are rather discouraged in F# for efficiency
   reasons. I proposed to use `yield` instead and then force the
   generator, but this has no direct OCaml equivalent. *)
exception Result of int
let most_significant_bit input_bits =
  try
    for i = Array.length input_bits - 1 downto 0 do
      if input_bits.(i) then raise (Result i)
    done;
    None
  with Result i -> Some i
share|improve this answer
    
I have solved it using recursive loop. I was just interested to see why the for loop + if statement doesn't work. Your answer is very fascinating but some parts went over my head :-) Can you please clarify with some code examples? –  Chaitanya Apr 9 '11 at 11:33
    
I don't use F#. If you're interested, I will post OCaml code examples in an hour or so. –  gasche Apr 9 '11 at 11:37
    
Excellent. Thank you very much. –  Chaitanya Apr 9 '11 at 14:50

Why using a loop when you can use high-order functions?

I would write:

let findMostSignificantBitPosition (inputBits:System.Collections.BitArray) =
    Seq.cast<bool> inputBits |> Seq.tryFindIndex id

Seq module contains many functions for manipulating collections. It is often a good alternative to using imperative loops.

but I still want to know what I was doing wrong above.

The body of a for loop is an expression of type unit. The only thing you can do from there is doing side-effects (modifying a mutable value, printing...).

In F#, a if then else is similar to ? : from C languages. The then and the else parts must have the same type, otherwise it doesn't make sense in a language with static typing. When the else is missing, the compiler assumes it is else (). Thus, the then must have type unit. Putting a value in a for loop doesn't mean return, because everything is a value in F# (including a if then).

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Thanks. But I really wanted to understand all the options and get down to the nitty gritty. Libraries are great at making you productive, but sometimes they hide some of the magic that happens under the hood. –  Chaitanya Apr 9 '11 at 14:52
1  
Sure. For learning, using recursion (instead of for loops) is a good idea. When you understand how it works, move on to high-order functions. The seq module is one of the first you should get familiar with. (I've edited my answer with addition info about the error message) –  Laurent Apr 9 '11 at 14:55

+1 for gasche
Here are some examples in F#. I added one (the second) to show how yield works with for within a sequence expression, as gasche mentioned.

(* using a mutable variable as accumulator as per gasche's example *)
let findMostSignificantBitPosition (inputBits: BitArray) =
    let mutable ret = None // 0
    for i = inputBits.Length - 1 downto 0  do
        if inputBits.[i] then ret <- i
    ret

(* transforming to a Seq of integers with a for, then taking the first element *)
let findMostSignificantBitPosition2 (inputBits: BitArray) =
    seq {
        for i = 0 to inputBits.Length - 1 do
        if inputBits.[i] then yield i
    } |> Seq.head

(* casting to a sequence of bools then taking the index of the first "true" *)
let findMostSignificantBitPosition3 (inputBits: BitArray) =
    inputBits|> Seq.cast<bool>  |> Seq.findIndex(fun f -> f) 

Edit: versions returning an Option

let findMostSignificantBitPosition (inputBits: BitArray) =
    let mutable ret = None
    for i = inputBits.Length - 1 downto 0  do
        if inputBits.[i] then ret <- Some i
    ret

let findMostSignificantBitPosition2 (inputBits: BitArray) =
    seq {
        for i = 0 to inputBits.Length - 1 do
        if inputBits.[i] then yield Some(i)
        else yield None
    } |> Seq.tryPick id

let findMostSignificantBitPosition3 (inputBits: BitArray) =
    inputBits|> Seq.cast<bool>  |> Seq.tryFindIndex(fun f -> f)
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Thanks for the yield version. A small detail: I'm not very happy with the idea of returning 0 in case all bits are false in the first version. –  gasche Apr 9 '11 at 15:14
    
Note that versions 2 and 3 will raise an exception if all bits are false. –  Laurent Apr 9 '11 at 15:20
    
@gasche: you're right. In that case you'd better use an Option: initialize the mutable ret and assign ret <- Some(i) in the for. –  Paolo Falabella Apr 9 '11 at 15:25
    
@Laurent: thanks, you are right; your version with tryFindIndex was more correct (also more compact, using id instead of writing the identity function explicitly). I added versions that return Options also for the other examples. –  Paolo Falabella Apr 9 '11 at 15:48

I would recommend using a higher-order function (as mentioned by Laurent) or writing a recursive function explicitly (which is a general approach to replace loops in F#).

If you want to see some fancy F# solution (which is probably better version of using some temporary lazy data structure), then you can take a look at my article which defines imperative computation builder for F#. This allows you to write something like:

let findMostSignificantBitPosition (inputBits:BitArray) = imperative {
    for b in Seq.cast<bool> inputBits do
      if b then return true
    return false }

There is some overhead (as with using other temporary lazy data structures), but it looks just like C# :-). EDIT I also posted the samples on F# Snippets: http://fssnip.net/40

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I think the reason your having issues with how to write this code is that you're not handling the failure case of not finding a set bit. Others have posted many ways of finding the bit. Here are a few ways of handling the failure case.

failure case by Option

let findMostSignificantBitPosition (inputBits:System.Collections.BitArray) =
    let rec loop i =
        if i = -1 then
            None
        elif inputBits.[i] then 
            Some i
        else
            loop (i - 1)

    loop (inputBits.Length - 1)

let test = new BitArray(1)
match findMostSignificantBitPosition test with
| Some i -> printf "Most Significant Bit: %i" i
| None -> printf "Most Significant Bit Not Found"

failure case by Exception

let findMostSignificantBitPosition (inputBits:System.Collections.BitArray) =
    let rec loop i =
        if i = -1 then
            failwith  "Most Significant Bit Not Found"
        elif inputBits.[i] then 
            i
        else
            loop (i - 1)

    loop (inputBits.Length - 1)

let test = new BitArray(1)
try 
    let i = findMostSignificantBitPosition test
    printf "Most Significant Bit: %i" i
with
    | Failure msg -> printf "%s" msg

failure case by -1

let findMostSignificantBitPosition (inputBits:System.Collections.BitArray) =
    let rec loop i =
        if i = -1 then
            i
        elif inputBits.[i] then 
            i
        else
            loop (i - 1)

    loop (inputBits.Length - 1)

let test = new BitArray(1)
let i = findMostSignificantBitPosition test
if i <> -1 then
    printf "Most Significant Bit: %i" i
else
    printf "Most Significant Bit Not Found"
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You can also handle the failure case with a sequence however I think returning 0 or 1 elements in a sequence is a code smell. –  gradbot Apr 9 '11 at 15:23
    
If your sequence cannot have more than one element, you should use an option type. –  Laurent Apr 11 '11 at 17:20

One of the options is to use seq and findIndex method as:

let findMostSignificantBitPosition (inputBits:System.Collections.BitArray) =
  seq {
      for i = inputBits.Length - 1 to 0  do
          yield inputBits.[i]
  } |> Seq.findIndex(fun e -> e)
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