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I want to execute a command at every 2 seconds and another command at every 5 secs in a while loop.

start
while [ 1 ]
do
if [ time diff == 2]
   do sth
fi 
if [ time diff == 5]
   do sth else
fi
end
dif = end - start

But this is a little problem when difference is 0. How can i do similar to this in a shell script?

share|improve this question
    
frankly, there are problems and there are tools that match the problems. Use a matching tool. For this purpose a Bourne compatible shell may simply not be the right tool. –  0xC0000022L Apr 9 '11 at 12:19
    
What is the little problem? A little else? You don't have an else, but this is just pseudocode, with unmatching names (start:startTime, endTime, end). –  user unknown Apr 9 '11 at 12:23
    
If you try to understand the pseudocode, then you will get what the problem is. –  thetux4 Apr 9 '11 at 12:25
    
You might want to be careful with the test 'while [ 1 ]'. 'while [ 0 ]' behaves the same way, and it's much clearer to write 'while true' –  William Pursell Apr 9 '11 at 12:28

6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Try this:

while true; do sth ; sleep 2 ; done

You can use a subshell:

#!/bin/bash

(while true ; do echo time2 ; sleep 2 ; done)&
(while true ; do echo time5 ; sleep 5 ; done)

However, you will have to do something to kill the background subshell later.

share|improve this answer
    
I know that but in the while loop i have two time dependent parts. one should run at every 2 secs , the other lets say 5 secs. –  thetux4 Apr 9 '11 at 11:35
1  
@thetux4 You should probably state that in your actual question. I can do that in Python... –  Keith Apr 9 '11 at 11:41
    
I changed my question. I can do in c as well. But dont know scripting syntax much. –  thetux4 Apr 9 '11 at 11:42
    
@thetux: I think you might have missed that the trailing '&' makes the parts run simultaneously. –  sehe Apr 9 '11 at 11:55

try sleep

while true
do
  ..
  sleep 2
done
share|improve this answer

possibly the simplest approach is a 10 second loop like this! (since 10 is the lowest common denominator of 2 and 5)

while true
do
    sth
    sleep 2
    sth
    sleep 1
    sth else
    sleep 1
    sth
    sleep 2
    sth
    sleep 2
    sth
    sth else
    sleep 2
done

It's a bit crazy though!

Of course this assume the commands are instant, you may want to background them with &

share|improve this answer
    
well actually 2 and 5 are changing, they are variables. I wrote for simplicity 2 and 5. Maybe i can try incrementing a variable, like a counter to detect time. –  thetux4 Apr 9 '11 at 11:53
    
ah no good then, this is pretty crazy anyway :) –  Paul Creasey Apr 9 '11 at 13:36

If you wanted to be very very thorough, you could use this as a starting point

#!/bin/bash

declare -a JOBPIDS

function repeatbackground()
{
    local delay="$1"
    shift
    (
        while true
        do
            sleep "$delay" || return 0 # abort on sleep interrupted
            eval "$@"
        done
    )&
    JOBPIDS=( ${JOBPIDS[@]-} $! )
}

function signalbackgroundtasks()
{
    for bgpid in "${JOBPIDS[@]}"
    do
        kill -TERM "$bgpid" || echo "Job $bgpid already vanished"
    done
    JOBPIDS=( )
}

trap "signalbackgroundtasks; exit 0" EXIT
repeatbackground 2 echo "by the other way"
repeatbackground 5 echo the other background job

echo "Running background jobs ${JOBPIDS[@]}"
wait
exit 0
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#!/bin/bash
#
rhythm () {

    beat1=$1
    beat2=$2
    tick=0
    while [ 1 ]
    do
        (( tick % $beat1)) || echo a
        (( tick % $beat2)) || echo b
        tick=$(((tick+1)%(beat1*beat2)))
        sleep 1
    done 
}

rhythm 2 5 

This works, of course, only for 2 parameters, and if the the time consumed by echo in the example/ the real command in real, is insignificant.

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The following doesn't use bash-specific features or subshells and is easy to generalize:

set 1 2 3 4 5
while :; do
  sleep 1
  shift  
  case $1 in
    2|4) echo "every 2 seconds" ;;
    5)   echo "every 5 seconds" ; set 1 2 3 4 5 ;;
  esac
done  
share|improve this answer

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