Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I just found a comment in this answer saying that using iostream::eof in a loop condition is "almost certainly wrong". I generally use something like while(cin>>n) - which I guess implicitly checks for EOF, why is checking for eof explicitly using iostream::eof wrong?

How is it different from using scanf("...",...)!=EOF in C (which I often use with no problems)?

share|improve this question
1  
scanf(...) != EOF won't work in C either, because scanf returns the number of fields successfully parsed and assigned. The correct condition is scanf(...) < n where n is the number of fields in the format string. –  Ben Voigt Apr 5 '12 at 16:50
    
@Ben Voigt, it will return a negative number (which EOF usually is defined as such) in case EOF is reached –  Sebastian Godelet Nov 23 '12 at 23:44
3  
@SebastianGodelet: Actually, it will return EOF if end of file is encountered before the first field conversion (successful or not). If end-of-file is reached between fields, it will return the number of fields succcessfully converted and stored. Which makes comparison to EOF wrong. –  Ben Voigt Nov 24 '12 at 15:06
    
@BenVoigt, Oh yes thanks! I didnt think of that. Now as i see Sly's answer should be the accepted one. –  Sebastian Godelet Nov 24 '12 at 16:00
1  
@Ben Yes, for this case (reading a simple int). But one can easily come up with a scenario where while(fail) loop terminates with both an actual failure and an eof. Think about if you require 3 ints per iteration (say you are reading an x-y-z point or something), but there is, erroneously, only two ints in the stream. –  sly Nov 24 '12 at 19:47
show 3 more comments

3 Answers

up vote 109 down vote accepted

Because iostream::eof will only be set after reading the end of the stream. It does not indicate, that the next read will be the end of the stream.
Consider this (and assume then next read will be at the end of the stream):

while(!inStream.eof()){
  int data;
  // yay, not end of stream yet, now read ...
  inStream >> data;
  // oh crap, now we read the end and *only* now the eof bit will be set (as well as the fail bit)
  // do stuff with (now uninitialized) data
}

Against this:

int data;
while(inStream >> data){
  // when we land here, we can be sure that the read was successful.
  // if it wasn't, the returned stream from operator>> would be converted to false
  // and the loop wouldn't even be entered
  // do stuff with correctly initialized data (hopefully)
}

And on your second question: Because

if(scanf("...",...)!=EOF)

is the same as

if(!(inStream >> data).eof())

and not the same as

if(!inStream.eof())
    inFile >> data
share|improve this answer
4  
Worth mentioning is that if (!(inStream >> data).eof()) doesn't do anything useful either. Fallacy 1: It'll not enter the condition if there was no whitespace after the last piece of data (last datum will not be processed). Fallacy 2: It will enter the condition even if reading data failed, as long as EOF was not reached (infinite loop, processing the same old data over and over again). –  Tronic Jan 20 '13 at 16:20
    
Slightly off-topic but let me put it. If one uses lazy evaluation, would this approach succeed without any problem? –  Dilawar Feb 25 '13 at 3:58
7  
The main problem is that just because we haven't reached the EOF, doesn't mean the next read will succeed. –  Joseph Mansfield Apr 6 '13 at 17:03
1  
@sftrabbit: all true but not very useful... even if there's no trailing '\n' it's reasonable to want other trailing whitespace to be handled consistently with other whitespace throughout the file (i.e. skipped). Further, a subtle consequence of "when you extract the one right before" is that while (!eof()) won't "work" on ints or std::strings when the input is totally empty, so even knowing there's no trailing \n care is needed. –  Tony D Apr 23 '13 at 3:34
2  
@TonyD Totally agree. The reason I'm saying it is because I think most people when they read this and similar answers will think that if the stream contains "Hello" (no trailing whitespace or \n) and a std::string is extracted, it will extract the letters from H to o, stop extracting, and then not set the EOF bit. In fact, it would set the EOF bit because it was the EOF that stopped the extraction. Just hoping to clear that up for people. –  Joseph Mansfield Apr 23 '13 at 8:23
show 1 more comment

This question and its answers are over a year long, however, I've been referred to here by another reader, who seems to have been classically conditioned by this thread and salivates at the sight of while(!in.eof()) in arbitrary contexts.

Indeed, the arguments proposed here seem to be missing an important subtlety about termination condition and reinforces the presumption in the title question, that "checking for eof explicitly using iostream::eof is wrong".

My proposition is that, not only this presumption is false, but checking eof() explicitly is indeed the more appropriate strategy. This point is subtle and important, and here goes my argument.

Suggested as correct termination and read order by answers above is the following:

int data;
while(in >> data) {  /* ... */ }

// which is equivalent to 
while( !(in >> data).fail() )  {  /* ... */ }

The subtle point here is that, a failure (due to read attempt beyond eof) is taken as the termination condition. What this means is that there is no way to distinguish between a successful stream and one that really fails. Take the following two examples:

  • A proper input: 1 2 3 4 5
  • An improper input: 1 2 a 3 4 5

The while(in>>data) terminates with a set failbit for both streams: In the first case, due to failed read attempt beyond eof after 5th iteration; and in the second case, due to the more obvious formatting error after 2nd iteration. So past the loop there is no (easy) way to distinguish a proper input from an improper one.

Whereas, take the following:

while( !in.eof() ) 
{  
   int data;
   in >> data;
   if ( in.fail() ) /* handle with break or throw */; 
   // now use data
}    

Here, in the absence of the explicit in.fail() test, whatever said in above answer by @Xeo is of course correct. Yet, this test is not introduced for the mere purpose of making while(!in.eof()) acceptable, but rather to distinguish between a proper and improper input stream. Let me introduce a slight modification which deals with trailing space more properly:

while( !in.eof() ) 
{  
   int data;
   in >> data >> ws; // eat whitespace with std::ws
   if ( in.fail() ) /* handle with break or throw */; 
   // now use data
}

std::ws skips any potential (zero or more) trailing blank space in the stream while setting the eofbit, and not the failbit (trailing blanks are commonly an acceptable form of input in a formatted stream). Here, in.fail() test will never return true due to reading past eof() except for all-blank streams; it will only be true when there is an actual error in the stream, and one that requires special handling.

Yet another version, if all-blank streams are acceptable input, is

while( !(in>>ws).eof() ) 
{  
   int data;
   in >> data; 
   if ( in.fail() ) /* handle with break or throw */; 
   // now use data
}

And that, sirs, is my proposition.

share|improve this answer
1  
"So past the loop there is no (easy) way to distinguish a proper input from an improper one." Except that in one case both eofbit and failbit are set, in the other only failbit is set. You only need to test that once after the loop has terminated, not on every iteration; it will only leave the loop once, so you only need to check why it left the loop once. while (in >> data) works fine for all blank streams. –  Jonathan Wakely Feb 25 '13 at 14:09
2  
What you are saying (and a point made earlier) is that a bad formatted stream can be identified as !eof & fail past loop. There are cases in which one can not rely on this. See above comment (goo.gl/9mXYX). Eitherway, I am not proposing eof-check as the-always-better alternative. I am merely saying, it is a possible and (in some cases more appropriate) way of doing this, rather than "most certainly wrong!" as it tends to be claimed around here in SO. –  sly Feb 25 '13 at 15:58
add comment

Because if programmers don't write while( stream >>n), they possibly write this:

while(!stream.eof())
{
    stream >> n;
    //some work on n;
}

Here the problem is, you cannot do some work on n without first checking if the stream read was successful, because if it was unsuccessful, your some work on n would be produce undesired result.

The whole point is that, eofbit, badbit, or failbit are set after an attempt is made to read from the stream. So if stream >> n fails, then eofbit, badbit, or failbit is set immediately, so its more idiomatic if you write while (stream >> n), because the returned object stream converts to false if there was some failure in reading from the stream and consequently the loop stops. And it converts to true if the read was successful and the loop continues.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.