Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm a bit new to programming so the answer to my problem has not become obvious, although I have tried to accomplish the task a number of ways.

The issue is that I'm trying to take an array of words, remove any punctuation from the array, and place the new words into a separate array. I attempted to do this but I keep getting garbage values when i output the new array.

The code reads:

norm(sepwords1,sepwords2,numwords);      <- where I called it in main

void norm(string words[], string wordz[],int count)       
{

        int i;
        int x;

        string newstring="";
        char current;


    for(i=0; i<count; i++)
        {
        for(x=0; x<words[i].length();x++)
        {        
          current= words[i].at(x);
                if(ispunct(current)==0)
                {
                newstring += current;
                }

        }        
                wordz[i]= newstring;
        }

}

the full main function is:

int main (int argc, char* argv[])
{



int count = argc;
int i;
string filename[count];
ifstream infile;
string fromfile[1000];
int numdata;
int pass;
char current;
int sum;
string masterstring="";
int x;
string sepwords[2000];
int sum1;
string temp="";
int start;
int fin;
string newstring="";
string newfile[1000];
int place;
int numwords;
string sepwords1[2000];
string newmaster="";
int j=0;
string currentz;
string highmark;
int index[2000];
string sepwords2[2000];
int counta=0;

for(i=0; i < count-1; i++) 
{
filename[i] = argv[i+1];
}

for( i=0; i < count-1; i++)
    {
    infile.open(filename[i].c_str());

    numdata=0;  

    while(!infile.eof())
    {

    getline(infile, fromfile[numdata], '\n');
    numdata++;

    }





    for(i=0; i<numdata; i++)
    {
    cout<<fromfile[i]<<endl;
    masterstring += fromfile[i] + " ";                                      //NUMBER ONE
    }



    numwords = split(masterstring, sepwords);
    cout<<numwords<<endl;                                                       //NUMBER TWO


    }

    for(i=0;i<numwords;i++)
    {
        newstring = toupper(sepwords[i].at(0));         
        newstring += sepwords[i].substr(1);
        sepwords1[i] = newstring;
        newstring="";
    }

    for(i=0;i<numwords;i++)
    {


    newmaster += sepwords1[i] + " ";
       j++;
          if(j > 10)
          {
           newmaster+= '\n';
           j=0;
          }

    }
    cout<<newmaster<<endl;                                              //NUMBER THREE



    norm(sepwords1,sepwords2,numwords);

        for(i=0;i<numwords;i++)
    {
    cout<<sepwords2<<endl;
    }

return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
How do you declare your original arrays that you pass into norm? Is there any reason you are using arrays and not std::vector, as I assume this list of strings could be variable? –  birryree Apr 9 '11 at 13:29
    
I think you want to newstring="" for every iteration of the outer loop. –  jfs Apr 9 '11 at 13:33
    
I did not use a vector simply because I haven't gotten as far as to know how to implement one :P –  Sam Apr 9 '11 at 13:42
    
@Sam, <vector> is part of the C++ standard library. If this is homework, then I can understand that... And can you post the full main function as well? –  birryree Apr 9 '11 at 13:48
    
This line is wrong "cout<<sepwords2<<endl;" You are outputting the pointer to the whole array. You want something like "cout<<sepwords2[i]<<endl;" –  Tom Apr 9 '11 at 14:04

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Not sure what you mean by gargage output?

If I call your function with this (g++ 4.4.5)

#include <string>
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
int
main  (int ac, char **av)
{
  int numwords = 3;
  string sepwords1[] = {"one,", "two", "three"};
  string sepwords2[numwords];
  norm(sepwords1,sepwords2,numwords);  
  for(size_t i=0;i<numwords;++i){
    std::cout<<"sepwords2["<<i<<"] = "<<sepwords2[i]<<std::endl;
  }

}

then I get the output

sepwords2[0] = one
sepwords2[1] = onetwo
sepwords2[2] = onetwothree

Is this not what you want?

If you don't want concatination, then you need to reset the newword variable,

  wordz[i]= newstring;  //this is in your norm function 
  newstring="";         //this is the line I added. 

then the output is

sepwords2[0] = one
sepwords2[1] = two
sepwords2[2] = three
share|improve this answer
    
Somewhat like that. I just have to remove punctuation from each word (if it has punctuation) and store it in the secondary array. Using the code I provided, when I cout from sepwords2[], i get "0xffbf5828" for every element. Am I missing something? Also, i dont understand what you did to remove the comma –  Sam Apr 9 '11 at 13:40
    
@sam The comer is removed because you have the "if(ispunct(current)==0)" check before you concatenate to the string - I didn't alter your function at all except the added line that I indicated. –  Tom Apr 9 '11 at 13:43
    
Oh right, yes I knew what the ispunct function did, I thought you might have done it a different way. But I did add your suggestion and I see why it makes sense, but I keep getting the value 0xffbf5828. Could it be something elsewhere in the code? Everything worked up until that point and I declared them in main as : "sepwords1[2000]" and "sepwords2[2000]" –  Sam Apr 9 '11 at 13:47
    
@Sam - try to have the code working all inside main, using code from Tom or myself. –  birryree Apr 9 '11 at 13:52

Your code should work, but there's probably a problem in the main function, such as with your arrays and the fact that you have to use two, so one reason I see for this behavior could be your array sizes don't match each other, and the one storing the original strings is larger than the one you're copying to.

#include <string>
#include <iostream>

int main() {
   const int SIZE = 5;
   string oldArray[SIZE] = {"He,llo", "Wor,ld", "H,ow", "Ar,e.", "Y,O,U"};
   string newArray[SIZE];

   for (int i = 0; i < 5; ++i) {
      // Moved this into the loop for ease, otherwise your
      // original code would have kept appending to this
      // newString variable unless you cleared it later
      std::string newString = "";
      for (int x = 0; x < oldArray[i].length(); ++x) {
            char current = oldArray[i].at(x);
            if (ispunct(current) == 0)
            {
               newString += current;
            }
      }
      newArray[i] = newString;
   }

   for (int i = 0; i < 5; ++i) {
      std::cout << newArray[i] << '\n';
   }
}

That's mostly your code, with a few tweaks to fix the concatenation problem of keeping newString around but without clearing it later.

You can do this problem more succinctly by using the std <algorithm> stuff, and by using <vector> which will handle growth and resizing for you.

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <algorithm>
#include <vector>

int main() {
    std::vector<std::string> stringsToCopy;
    stringsToCopy.push_back("Hel,lo,");
    stringsToCopy.push_back("th,ere.");

    // Make a copy of the other vector, since it seems like you want to keep
    // the original data. This will copy all the elements from the stringsToCopy
    // vector.
    std::vector<std::string> newStrings = stringsToCopy;

    // simplicity, but you could use an iterator as well, which would be
    // more verbose
    for (int i = 0; i < newStrings.size(); ++i) {
        // get a reference to the current string in the
        // vector for convenience, so we can use a shorter
        // name for it
        std::string& s = newStrings[i];

        // because remove_if doesn't actually delete things from a 
        // container, we should also call the string's erase method
        s.erase(std::remove_if(s.begin(), s.end(), ispunct), s.end());
    }


    for (int i = 0; i < newStrings.size(); ++i) {
        std::cout << newStrings[i] << '\n';
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the response. I will try to learn how to use vectors more proficiently as I do not really have a clue at the moment. I thought I'd add though, that both arrays were declared in main with a size of 2000, so I'm not sure if that's the exact error. (or maybe I misinterpreted what you were saying.) –  Sam Apr 9 '11 at 13:54
    
@Sam - 2000 elements is fine - what's the count you pass into norm? Is it 2000 or the actual number of strings that words contains? –  birryree Apr 9 '11 at 13:56
    
I posted the full main function, count should be the number of element in the original array. Oh I forgot to add that there's another function in use to determine the numbers of words in the array, but that has been working so far so I doubt it is the issue –  Sam Apr 9 '11 at 14:03
    
+1 for beautiful stl solution –  etipici Apr 9 '11 at 14:44

Arrays are fixed size arrays. If you need to add and remove elements from an "array" you should use a list or vector, which are sequences of variable size.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.