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I have textboxes in my Windows Forms application, and I want that when the user presses the ENTER key then the cursor goes to the next textbox.

How do I do this?

Is this a good habit or shall I avoid it? Actually the users are very much prone and have adapted and have become habitual of pressing ENTER key for navigation between textboxes and buttons. So, for them I need to do this.

Please help me with the complete code using two text-boxes as an example.

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it all depends of your requirement –  anishMarokey Apr 9 '11 at 14:20
    
possible duplicate of C# - Press Enter to move to next control on a WinForm –  David Hall Apr 9 '11 at 14:24

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I would say the nicest way is to create a user control that inherits from TextBox and then override the OnKeyPress method to capture enter and send a tab. Focus will then be given to the next TabIndex on the form, just as though a tab had actually been entered.

The code below does exactly that:

public partial class CustomTextbox : TextBox
{
    public CustomTextbox()
    {
        InitializeComponent();            
    }

    protected override void OnKeyPress(KeyPressEventArgs e)
    {
        if (e.KeyChar == '\r')
        {
            e.Handled = true;
            SendKeys.Send("{TAB}");
        }

    }
} 

You could also put similar code in the KeyPress event handlers for your controls but this saves a lot of duplicate code and unnececessary event handler.

As for whether this is good practice - I would say in general, no, changing the default behaviour of forms is never a good idea, but of course, if this is what your users want and expect, then it is their decision.

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sir, do controls like text-boxes or buttons do not have OnKeyPress method? when i wrote button1. and checked out in the IntelliSense , then there's no such method? why so? –  sqlchild Apr 9 '11 at 14:52
    
so , according to you, i shall first create a new project of user control in visual studio and put your code , and use that control in other winform projects by adding it in the ToolBox? –  sqlchild Apr 9 '11 at 14:54
    
also, sir, there's no OnKeyPress event when i see in the Properties of a textbox by pressing F4 key. –  sqlchild Apr 9 '11 at 14:55
    
@sqlchild I'm not sure what your question is here. All controls have the OnKeyPress method - but it is a protected method of the Control class which they inherit from. So to do anything with this you either need to override the method as I have shown (in a control the inherits from TextBox for example), or handle the KeyPress method. –  David Hall Apr 9 '11 at 14:59
    
@sqlchild - for now you don't need a new project, just a new usercontrol which inherits from textbox - and yes, you add it to your ToolBox. And sorry, I should have written KeyPress eventhandler. –  David Hall Apr 9 '11 at 15:01

This is a bad idea. The standard UI is for TAB to move between input fields. You make your app less useable when you elect not to follow well known standards. These standards are what makes UI intuitive.

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Heffeman : sir, can you refer me some book or links where its written that its a bad idea to play with the RETURN key. actually i need to show it to my boss, that its really a bad one –  sqlchild Apr 9 '11 at 14:49
    
read ms user experience guidelines. ENTER is for accepting and closing a dialog. –  David Heffernan Apr 9 '11 at 15:13

For example you could trap OnKeyUp event, check if it is RETURN and process source control to use Focus() to next control...

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Yes, it depends on you

For a sample, you can place 4 textbox on the form and use the following code

private void textBox1_KeyUp(object sender, KeyEventArgs e)
{
    if (e.KeyCode == Keys.Enter)
    {
        textBox2.Focus();
    }
}

private void textBox2_KeyUp(object sender, KeyEventArgs e)
{
    if (e.KeyCode == Keys.Enter)
    {
        textBox3.Focus();
    }
}

private void textBox3_KeyUp(object sender, KeyEventArgs e)
{
    if (e.KeyCode == Keys.Enter)
    {
        textBox4.Focus();
    }
}

It might help you.

Happy coding...

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@sqlchild, @Amol: To make it easier you could use a single OnKeyUp event and, using switch(...) on src control, you can decide which control Focus()... –  Marco Apr 9 '11 at 14:36
    
its not working sir, do i have to do something with the tabindexes? –  sqlchild Apr 9 '11 at 14:40
    
Generate the event from the form for each textbox's keyup. i think it should work. Try to place the controls again on the form. –  Amol Apr 9 '11 at 14:48

Yes you can fire the KeyDown or KeyUp event on a TextBox. To check whether it was the enter key, you can do the following:

//e is the KeyEventArgs from the event.
e.KeyCode == Keys.Enter

Then, if he has pressed the enter key, you can do:

System.Windows.Forms.Control.SelectNextControl();

To set the order of your controls, in Visual Studio look for this little icon:

http://i.stack.imgur.com/nZWLO.png

Click it, and you'll go into tab ordering mode, as I like to call it. Just click the controls in the order you wish them to be and after you're done, click the little icon again. Presto!

Now whether that is a good idea of not, completely depends on how used to it your end users are. If they have always used it like this, and you give them something that doesn't fit into their mind model, they are going to say your software is broken.

Always always always try to emulate what processes the user already has in place in their head.

Read this if you have the time, it's a really light and very good read:

http://www.joelonsoftware.com/uibook/fog0000000249.html

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sir, SelectNextControl() is not coming in my IntelliSense? is it a version problem of .net framework? –  sqlchild Apr 9 '11 at 15:04
    
@sqlchild: You can also do this instead, SendKeys.Send("{TAB}") on the KeyDown or KeyUp event. It'll have the same end result. –  Only Bolivian Here Apr 9 '11 at 15:10
    
SendKeys.Send("{TAB}") hints at the real solution! –  David Heffernan Apr 9 '11 at 17:05

I think the best way would be to:

1) assign each textbox's TabIndex attribute incrementally (first is x, next is x+1 etc).

2) capture on the OnKeyUp event on the whole form, check the argument to see if the key was RETURN

3) focus the next textbox using its TabIndex. Or simulate the TAB key.

This code should work:

private void Form1_KeyUp(object sender, KeyEventArgs e)
{
    if (e.KeyCode == Keys.Enter)
    {
        GetNextControl((TextBox)sender, true);
    }
}

This way you end up writing only one function, and you can have as many textboxes as you want.

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this din't work –  sqlchild Apr 11 '11 at 6:14

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