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So here's something I find puzzling.

I'm working on a Javascript that needs to parse XML data and I'm using jQuery's $.ajax to fetch and parse the data. It's working great everywhere except when I test with Internet Explorer 8 (it might be a problem on 7 and 9 too). On IE, I'm getting parse errors. I installed a console.log to check the HTTP headers. Here's what I get from Chrome on Windows XP and what I'm getting from IE --

Chrome:

Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2011 16:06:24 GMT
Connection: Keep-Alive
Content-Length: 2283
Last-Modified: Sat, 09 Apr 2011 15:59:12 GMT
Server: Apache/2.2.14 (Ubuntu)
ETag: "48048-8eb-4a07e6c693400"
Content-Type: application/xml
Accept-Ranges: bytes
Keep-Alive: timeout=15, max=97

IE8:

LOG: ETag: "48048-8eb-4a07d7a3cbe40"
Keep-Alive: timeout=15, max=97
Content-Type: text/html
Content-Length: 2283
Last-Modified: Sat, 09 Apr 2011 14:51:29 GMT

This is what the xml document looks like:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<root>
    <tweet>
        <name>name</name>
        <message>message</message>
        <avatar>avatar</avatar>
    </tweet>
    <tweet>
        <name>name</name>
        <message>message</message>
        <avatar>avatar</avatar>
    </tweet>
</root>

I checked the MIME configuring for my Apache server and it is set to send xml files as 'application/xml'. So it's strangely sending a content-type of 'application/xml' to Chrome, but IE gets content-type of 'text/html'.

So I built a simple PHP script:

<?php
header('Content-type: application/xml; charset=UTF-8');
echo '<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" ?>';
?>
<root>
    <tweet>
        <name>name</name>
        <message>message</message>
        <avatar>avatar</avatar>
    </tweet>
    <tweet>
        <name>name</name>
        <message>message</message>
        <avatar>avatar</avatar>
    </tweet>
</root>

When I change the Javascript to retrieve the PHP instead of the XML file, I get these response headers --

Chrome with PHP:

Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2011 16:10:39 GMT
X-Powered-By: PHP/5.2.10-2ubuntu6.7
Connection: Keep-Alive
Content-Length: 2102
Server: Apache/2.2.14 (Ubuntu)
Content-Type: application/xml; charset=UTF-8
Keep-Alive: timeout=15, max=97

IE with PHP:

LOG: X-Powered-By: PHP/5.2.10-2ubuntu6.7
Content-Length: 2102
Keep-Alive: timeout=15, max=100
Content-Type: application/xml; charset=UTF-8

So from what I can tell, with my limited Apache knowledge, it seems like the raw XML file is getting sent without the right content-type only to IE, even though I have it configured to send 'application/xml'. Chrome is receiving the right content-type. When I use PHP, Apache seems to be following my wishes and sending 'application/xml' because that is what I stamped it as in the script. Is it also strange that IE doesn't have all the same headers as Chrome? "Server" is missing for instance.

So what could possibly be getting in the way and changing 'application/xml' to 'text/html' only for Internet Explorer? I'd hate to have to rely on a PHP script to output my XML data. I thought of mod-deflate, but I disabled it and the results are the same.

Any ideas?

(PS - the XML I'm including is just a sample, so the content-lengths don't match up)

share|improve this question
    
So … this is a webserver administration question? Better fit for Server Fault? –  Kissaki Apr 9 '11 at 16:36
    
For more fun and excitement, I changed my XML file to have the extension .tweets, and I put an "AddType application/xml tweets" into my Apache2 directives for that directory. Internet Explorer gets the correct content-type for the .tweets file! So somewhere, something seems to be interrupting Apache's headers for Internet Explorer, but only with a .xml file (and maybe other standard types). Sorry, I did not know about serverfault.com. I guess I will try there. –  JonMcL Apr 9 '11 at 16:44

2 Answers 2

IE may send a different HTTP request, asking for text/html primarily or only and chrome on the other hand application/xml as well. Did you check the HTTP request headers?

Also, how did you inspect the HTTP packets? Maybe IE drops the server tag? (Which is pretty useless anyway, most of the time.)

As you tested with PHP, setting the content-type, and it worked, it’s a webserver setting and/or HTTP-Request difference. Check those.

share|improve this answer
    
I was checking via jQuery's 'complete' event for the $.ajax() function. I will try and figure out a way to grab the request headers. –  JonMcL Apr 9 '11 at 16:46
up vote 0 down vote accepted

So I think I figured it out.

It appears that IE caches the AJAX GET data in such a way that it is hard (impossible?) to clear it out. Maybe I had the xml configured as text/xml at some point, but I don't think so. Basically, IE continued to use the cached results for that XML file over the actual server results. That also explains why the HTTP headers looked so odd (no server information for instance). Or it's possible that the cache is always producing text/html (I gave up further tests).

My solution: I added a '?avoidcache=' + a timestamp to the end of the URL in the GET request. Now IE gets the proper HTTP headers that I set on the server.

Wow do I hate Internet Explorer. How many development hours are wasted creating workarounds for it's horrible behavior?

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