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Why I cannot do this in java?

Object[] o = (Object[])(new int[]{0,1,2,3.14,4});

I have a method that receives an object and then represents it as a string, but depending on his type (primitive, primitive wrapper, array, etc...). When I was creating a Unit test, I was passing an array as Object which is Ok, but when I perform cast of that object into Object[] I'm getting ClassCastException. This is only happening with primitive type arrays. Is there any way to avoid this behavior? If not, could someone explain what is the reason of this behavior on Java Virtual Machine.

Any help is very appreciated.

After getting response from StKiller and other users I was able to create a more generic method, which is located below:

private final Class<?>[] ARRAY_PRIMITIVE_TYPES = { 
        int[].class, float[].class, double[].class, boolean[].class, 
        byte[].class, short[].class, long[].class, char[].class };

private Object[] getArray(Object val){
    Class<?> valKlass = val.getClass();
    Object[] outputArray = null;

    for(Class<?> arrKlass : ARRAY_PRIMITIVE_TYPES){
        if(valKlass.isAssignableFrom(arrKlass)){
            int arrlength = Array.getLength(val);
            outputArray = new Object[arrlength];
            for(int i = 0; i < arrlength; ++i){
                outputArray[i] = Array.get(val, i);
                            }
            break;
        }
    }
    if(outputArray == null) // not primitive type array
        outputArray = (Object[])val;

    return outputArray;
}

You can pass kind of array into getArray method, which will return Object[] without throwing ClassCastException.

Thanks again for all your replies.

share|improve this question
    
possible duplicate of casting Object array to Integer array error –  Nishant Apr 9 '11 at 16:49
    
By the way, the number 3.14 is not an integer. –  AlexW Apr 9 '11 at 17:07

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Primitive type cannot be transformed in this way. In your case, there is an array of double values, cause of 3.14. This will work:

    List<Object> objectList = new ArrayList<Object>();
    objectList.addAll(Arrays.asList(0,1,2,3.14,4));

Even this works :

List<Object> objectList = new ArrayList<Object>();
objectList.addAll(Arrays.asList(0,"sfsd",2,3.14,new Regexp("Test")));
for(Object object:objectList)
{
    System.out.println(object);
}

UPDATE Ok, there as there was said, there is not direct way to cast a primitive array to an Object[]. If you want a method that transforms any array in String, I can suggest this way

public class CastArray {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        CastArray test = new CastArray();
        test.TestObj(new int[]{1, 2, 4});
        test.TestObj(new char[]{'c', 'a', 'a'});
        test.TestObj(new String[]{"fdsa", "fdafds"});
    }

    public void TestObj(Object obj) {
        if (!(obj instanceof Object[])) {
            if (obj instanceof int[]) {
                for (int i : (int[]) obj) {
                    System.out.print(i + " ");
                }
                System.out.println("");
            }
            if (obj instanceof char[]) {
                for (char c : (char[]) obj) {
                    System.out.print(c + " ");
                }
                System.out.println("");
            }
            //and so on, for every primitive type.
        } else {
            System.out.println(Arrays.asList((Object[]) obj));
        }
    }
}

Yes, it's annoying to write a loop for every primitive type, but there is no other way, IMHO.

share|improve this answer
    
But my method receives object, and I don't know what kind of object user has passed. Using reflection I can detect if it as an Array and then cast it to Object[]. Is there any workaround? –  aumanets Apr 9 '11 at 17:55
    
Look please at the updated answer. –  Andrei Podoprîgora Apr 9 '11 at 19:04
    
I thought there was a more organized way to write this code, more "generic". Thanks. –  aumanets Apr 9 '11 at 19:54

In Java, primitive types and reference types are two distinct worlds. This reflects to arrays: A primitive array is not an object array, that's why you can't cast.

Here is a simpler version of your solution in the question:

private Object[] getArray(Object val){
    if (val instanceof Object[])
       return (Object[])val;
    int arrlength = Array.getLength(val);
    Object[] outputArray = new Object[arrlength];
    for(int i = 0; i < arrlength; ++i){
       outputArray[i] = Array.get(val, i);
    }
    return outputArray;
}

This will still work when they sometimes decide to add new primitive types to the VM.

Of course, you might want to do the copying always, not only in the primitive case, then it gets even simpler:

private Object[] getArray(Object val){
    int arrlength = Array.getLength(val);
    Object[] outputArray = new Object[arrlength];
    for(int i = 0; i < arrlength; ++i){
       outputArray[i] = Array.get(val, i);
    }
    return outputArray;
}

Of course, this is not casting, but converting.

share|improve this answer
    
Excellent! Thanks. –  aumanets Apr 10 '11 at 9:22
    
Array.getLength and get was just what I needed. So much cleaner code than checking if the array is of a given primitive type and then casting to that. Thanks! –  Jan Aagaard Meier Apr 16 '13 at 12:56

Primitive types are not Objects. There is no workaround, you can cast any arrays that contain objects to Object[], but not arrays that contain primitive types.

share|improve this answer
    
You can't cast directly but if you know what data to expect you can create new classes to accomodate that accordingly. –  AlexW Apr 9 '11 at 16:58
    
Sure, but then its not casting anymore. –  Ingo Apr 9 '11 at 17:02
    
You said "there's no workaround", I'm just saying... there's always a workaround. –  AlexW Apr 9 '11 at 17:04
    
The question was about casting, I can't help it. I assume that the OP is clever enough to figure that to transform an int[] array to an Integer[] array is possible. You don't, it seems. –  Ingo Apr 9 '11 at 17:39
    
You can't caste an int to an Object, thats the issue. Not int to Integer. Simple solution, use Java classes. Way more preferable for design taking whole blocks of data into an object. –  AlexW Apr 9 '11 at 17:47

You could do:

int[] intArray = new int[]{0,1,2,3,14,4};
ArrayList<MyObject> myObjArray = new ArrayList<MyObject>;

for (int i = 0; i < intArray.length; i++) {
myObjArray.set(new MyObject(intArray[i]));
}

You'd need to define a class where the constructor sets the integer parameter to an instance field (in the MyObject class).

share|improve this answer

You can only cast an object of type derived type, which is handled and passed as base type. In the opposite direction, you can just assign a derived type to a base type:

Object o = new String ("simple assignment");
String s = (String) o; 

There in no transformation of the Object going on - it is just demasked as what it is, what it always was.

Integer [] ia = new Integer [] {4, 2, 6};
Object  [] oa = ia;     

But primitive ints aren't Objects, hence they can't be assigned to an Object array. Casting, however, would, if possible, only play a role in the opposite direction.

share|improve this answer

Another implementation for the getArray function with flexible handling of primitive types :

public static Object[] createArrayFromArrayObject(Object o) throws XYZException {
    if(!o.getClass().isArray())
        throw new XYZException("parameter is not an array");

    if(!o.getClass().getComponentType().isPrimitive())
        return (Object[])o;

    int element_count = Array.getLength(o);
    Object elements[] = new Object[element_count];

    for(int i = 0; i < element_count; i++){
        elements[i] = Array.get(o, i);          
    }

    return elements;
}
share|improve this answer

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