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Hey guys I have the following while loop which seems not to stop. It's supposed to ask the user for an hour. I'm trying to catch the event where the user does not enter a number.

i.e. Enter hour: foo You did not enter a valid value

It should then allow the user to enter a value for hour again, but it keeps printing the error message over and over

    private static void setTime(Clock clock){
        int hours = -1;
        int minutes = -1;
        int seconds = -1;

        Scanner scanner = new Scanner(System.in);

        while(true)
        {
            try{
                System.out.print("Enter hours: ");
                hours = scanner.nextInt();          
            }
            catch(NumberFormatException nfe){
                System.out.println("Input was not an integer, please try again");
                continue;
            }
            catch(InputMismatchException ims){
                System.out.println("Input was not an integer, please try again");
                continue;
            }
            break;
        }
}
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5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Move Scanner scanner = ... into the while loop.

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Thanks, the works. So why is it necessary to have it inside the while loop? –  Tony Apr 9 '11 at 17:11
    
All that does is make you a billion scanners. It gains no performance benefit at all. –  corsiKa Apr 9 '11 at 17:13
    
@Tony the answer lies in the documentation and other answer for your question. You should read them. –  krtek Apr 9 '11 at 17:15

From the documentation :

When a scanner throws an InputMismatchException, the scanner will not pass the token that caused the exception, so that it may be retrieved or skipped via some other method.

You must read the wrong answer before restarting the loop, otherwise it will read the same thing again and again.

And according to the documentation nextInt() never return a NumberFormatException, so there's no need to test against it.

You can also use hasNextInt() like this :

while(true) {
    if(scanner.hasNextInt()) {
        hours = scanner.nextInt();
        break;
    } else {
        scanner.next();
        System.out.println("You must enter an integer");
    }
}
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If the user enters "F 3" and presses enter, wouldn't this bomb, when it should be acquiring the 3? –  corsiKa Apr 9 '11 at 17:25

You can add scanner.nextLine(); after printing the exception.

To be clear:

try{
                System.out.print("Enter hours: ");

                hours = scanner.nextInt();          
            }
            catch(NumberFormatException nfe){
                System.out.println("Input was not an integer, please try again");
                scanner.nextLine();
                continue;
            }
            catch(InputMismatchException ims){
                System.out.println("I--nput was not an integer, please try again");
                scanner.nextLine();
                continue;
            }
            break;
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That would be a bad idea if you have hours, minutes, and seconds on the same line. And I'm not entirely sure why you'd want to do that anyway... –  corsiKa Apr 9 '11 at 17:12
    
This won't be a bad idea if all he gets is hours, and exception is thrown anyway. I ran the same code not as a separate function but in main and got the same result. why? I'm not sure, but probably because it gets the printed error into scanner. –  MByD Apr 9 '11 at 17:15

Have you tried reading from the Scanner as a string first, and then attempting to parse it as an integer?

e.g.

String line = scanner.nextLine();
hours = Integer.parseInt(line);
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This does not have the same effect. If the line is "12 13 14", it will bomb on you. You also have lost access to your minutes and seconds. –  corsiKa Apr 9 '11 at 17:13
    
The delimiter for the Scanner could be changed to be a space, and then scanner.next() used instead of scanner.nextLine(). Integer.parseInt could then be used on each value. –  Tom W Apr 9 '11 at 17:16
    
The default value already is whitespace. –  corsiKa Apr 9 '11 at 17:17
    
Yes, so .next() will return the next String. The integer can then be parsed separately and any errors caught. –  Tom W Apr 9 '11 at 17:19

It's because scanner.nextInt() moves to the next token ONLY if the parsing has been successful (see the Javadoc).

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