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I want to know about the efficiency of Java and the advantages and disadvantages of Java Virtual Machine and Android. Efficiency is the low use of memory, low use of the processor and fast execution.

Mobile devices are simpler than PC, then the apps need to be more efficient. Servers receive many connections and they need to be very efficient. Many mobile devices use Android and Java apps, and many servers use PHP.

Can Java and interpreted languages, such as Java Script, Python and PHP, be more efficient than C and C++?

JIT (just in time) advantages:

  • It can optimize better, because it knows the value of some variables and where it is used or changed.
  • It knows the processor and can optimize with processor specific instructions.
  • It is easier to transform functions into inline function.
  • It can remove known conditional tests and remove blocks that will not be run.

Java disadvantages:

  • When the app run for the first time, the app will be very slow, because the bytecodes will be interpreted and JIT compiler will do many analysis to find good optimizations. The apps cannot use the maximum of the hardware power. If an app is a game or a real-time app, if it be run for the first successfully and with no delay, but it uses the maximum of the hardware power, then the next time the app be run, it will not use the maximum of the hardware power due to optimizations. The problem is the app cannot be designed to use the maximum of the hardware power after the optimization, because it will be too slow on the first run, and will not continue to run.
  • Java checks if the array index is not out of bounds, and it checks if the pointers are not null. It will add several internal "if"s to generated code.
  • All objects use garbage collector, including objects that are very easy to manually delete.
  • All instances of objects are created with dynamic memory allocation, including objects that can easily use the stack. If a loop iteration begins creating an instance of a class and ends deleting the created object, dynamic memory allocation will be inefficient.
  • The garbage collector needs to stop the app while it cleans the memory and it is very undesired for games, GUI apps and real-time apps. Reference counting is slow and it cannot handle circular references. Multi-threaded garbage collector is slower and it needs more use of the CPU.
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I'm not expert on this so I'm throwing a comment instead of a reply but 1) Dalvik isn't really a JVM, it's somewhere inbetween JVM and custom VM by Google 2) all optimizations are JVM specific; Sun/Oracle's HotSpot is really good at null check termination which basically nulls (hah!) one of those disadvantages you mention 3) You make a lot of assumptions of all GC:s available for Java in your last point, most (if not all) of them do not apply to all JVM GC:s out there. –  Esko Apr 9 '11 at 18:45
    
Following up on the null checks, they can be implemented by the following single instruction: cmp [eax], eax. For the case of a non-null object, this instruction causes no delay in almost all cases on a modern processor. The runtime can handle the seg fault if the pointer is null in order to throw the appropriate exception. –  Sam Harwell Apr 28 '12 at 13:55

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Can Java and interpreted languages, such as Java Script, Python and PHP, be more efficient than C and C++?

It's very difficult to get more efficient than the best C and C++ programs. There's a lot of C and C++ programs that are nowhere near as efficient as that though, and beating them with (modern) Java code is quite practical if you're any good. I've also heard good things about the current best-of-breed Javascript engines, but I've never studied them in detail.

With Python and PHP (and many other languages besides) it's a bit different. Those languages are written in C, so it's obvious they cannot be more efficient than C (follows by construction). Yet it's much easier to write efficient code in them (i.e., that uses what is in-effect a very well-written C library) than it is to start from scratch. In particular, it reduces the number of defects per program. That's a very important metric in practice; anyone can produce fast code if it's allowed to be wrong.

In general, I advise not worrying about getting maximal efficiency. You run up against the law of diminishing returns. Instead, use sensible overall algorithms (or, as a friend of mine once said to me, “look after the big O()s and let the constant factors look after themselves”) and focus on the question of whether the program is good enough in practice. Once it is, stop fiddling around and ship it!

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+1 for the last paragraph. In most cases, programmer efficiency (i.e. not wasting your time) is more important than code efficiency. –  Stephen C Apr 26 '11 at 6:55
    
"those languages are written in C"... isn't JVM also written in C? at least, part of it? –  ernesto Jun 11 '12 at 9:31

Let's pick apart your claimed disadvantages:

  • When the app run for the first time, the app will be very slow, because the bytecodes will be interpreted and JIT compiler will do many analysis to find good optimizations. The apps cannot use the maximum of the hardware power.

JIT compilation is an implementation issue. Not all platforms do it. Indeed, the Android platform could be modified to 1) do ahead of time compilation, or 2) cache the native code produced by the JIT to give faster startup next time you run the app.

It is interesting that various Java vendors have tried these strategies at various times, and yet the empirical evidence is that plain JIT is the best strategy.

  • Java checks if the array index is not out of bounds, and it checks if the pointers are not null. It will add several internal "if"s to generated code.

The JIT compiler can optimize away many of these tests. For the rest, the overheads tend to be relatively small; e.g. a few percent difference ... not a factor of 2.

Note that the alternative to checking is the risk that typical application bugs will crash the android platform. Certainly, garbage collection becomes problematic if applications can trash memory.

  • All objects use garbage collector, including objects that are very easy to manually delete.

The flip-side is that it is easy to forget to delete objects, delete objects twice, use them after they have been deleted and so on. These mistakes all lead to bugs that tend to be hard to track down.

  • All instances of objects are created with dynamic memory allocation, including objects that can easily use the stack. If a loop iteration begins creating an instance of a class and ends deleting the created object, dynamic memory allocation will be inefficient.

Java dynamic memory allocation and object creation is FAST. Faster than in C++ for example.

  • The garbage collector needs to stop the app while it cleans the memory and it is very undesired for games, GUI apps and real-time apps.

Use a concurrent / low-pause garbage collector then. Another approach is to implement your app to not generate lots of garbage ... and seldom trigger garbage collection.

  • Reference counting is slow and it cannot handle circular references.

No decent Java GC uses reference counting. (On the other hand, a lot of C / C++ manual memory management schemes do. For instance, so-called smart pointer schemes in C++.)

  • Multi-threaded garbage collector is slower and it needs more use of the CPU.

You actually mean concurrent collection I think. Yes it does, but that's the penalty you pay for the extra responsiveness that you demand for interactive games / realtime apps.

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What you describe as 'efficient' I would describe as 'ideal'. An application that requires little memory, little CPU time and runs quickly, put another way, is one that is good, fast, and cheap all at the same time. Never mind if it does anything useful or interesting.

The only comparison I'd view as reasonable, if all three goals are required, is among applications that produce a common result. In that case, it is unlikely, given a competing group of evenly-capable programmers, that any one implementation would excel on all three counts over the others.

That said, your question leaves out a key criterion to the mobile market: rate of application development. Mobile applications also profit far more from positive user experience than back-end optimization. Without that constraint, the question of efficiency as you put it, seems to me more of an ponderous consideration than a practical one.

But to the actual question: can a language like Java produce more efficient code than one that compiles statically to the instruction set of the target machine? Probably not. Can it be as efficient, or efficient enough? Absolutely. If we considered an execution platform with fixed, severely constrained resources that changes infrequently, it would be a different matter.

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In any language, the way to get fast execution is to do the job with as little execution as possible, and as little garbage collection as possible.

That sounds like a vacuous generality, but what it means in practice, regardless of language, is

  1. For the data structure design, keep it as simple as possible. Stay away from the fancy collection classes full of bells and whistles. Especially stay away from notifications as a way of keeping data consistent. If your data is normalized, it can never be inconsistent. If you can't normalize it, it's better to tolerate temporary inconsistency, than to try to keep it tight with notifications.

  2. Performance problems creep in, even into the best code. You should try not to make them, but you will still make them. Most important is knowing how to find them, once made, and remove them. Here's a blow-by-blow example. If in doing this, you find you need a better big-O algorithm, then put it in. Putting one in without being sure it's needed is a recipe for slowness.

No language can rescue a program from non-removed performance problems. The language and its compiler, JITter, etc. are like a race horse. It's fine to want a good horse, but it's a waste if the jockey isn't as slim as possible. Your program is the jockey, and it's your job to take it on a weight-loss program.

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I will paste an interesting answer given by the James Gosling himself in the Book Masterminds of Programming.

Well, I’ve heard it said that effectively you have two compilers in the Java world. You have the compiler to Java bytecode, and then you have your JIT, which basically recompiles everything specifically again. All of your scary optimizations are in the JIT.

James: Exactly. These days we’re beating the really good C and C++ compilers pretty much always. When you go to the dynamic compiler, you get two advantages when the compiler’s running right at the last moment. One is you know exactly what chipset you’re running on. So many times when people are compiling a piece of C code, they have to compile it to run on kind of the generic x86 architecture. Almost none of the binaries you get are particularly well tuned for any of them. You download the latest copy of Mozilla,and it’ll run on pretty much any Intel architecture CPU. There’s pretty much one Linux binary. It’s pretty generic, and it’s compiled with GCC, which is not a very good C compiler.

When HotSpot runs, it knows exactly what chipset you’re running on. It knows exactly how the cache works. It knows exactly how the memory hierarchy works. It knows exactly how all the pipeline interlocks work in the CPU. It knows what instruction set extensions this chip has got. It optimizes for precisely what machine you’re on. Then the other half of it is that it actually sees the application as it’s running. It’s able to have statistics that know which things are important. It’s able to inline things that a C compiler could never do. The kind of stuff that gets inlined in the Java world is pretty amazing. Then you tack onto that the way the storage management works with the modern garbage collectors. With a modern garbage collector, storage allocation is extremely fast.

Masterminds of Programming

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"himself"? Don't we have enough pedestals in this business? In any case, all that wonderfulness he mentions is great for code that is otherwise optimal and happens to spend most of its time in CPU-bound user code, rather than I/O or system calls. Most code is not otherwise optimal. –  Mike Dunlavey Apr 10 '11 at 15:59

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