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How to split a string?

What is the right way to split a string into a vector of strings. Delimiter is space or comma.

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A split in which commas and spaces are both delimiters, or a function that splits either on space or on comma, according to a parameter? –  Steve Jessop Apr 9 '11 at 20:18
    
Some of the answers to stackoverflow.com/questions/236129/how-to-split-a-string can readily be adapted to work with multiple delimiters. –  Gareth McCaughan Apr 9 '11 at 20:23

3 Answers 3

up vote 38 down vote accepted

For space separated strings, then you can do this:

std::string s = "What is the right way to split a string into a vector of strings";
std::stringstream ss(s);
std::istream_iterator<std::string> begin(ss);
std::istream_iterator<std::string> end;
std::vector<std::string> vstrings(begin, end);
std::copy(vstrings.begin(), vstrings.end(), std::ostream_iterator<std::string>(std::cout, "\n"));

Output:

What
is
the
right
way
to
split
a
string
into
a
vector
of
strings

Online Demo : http://ideone.com/d8E2G


string that have both comma and space

struct tokens: std::ctype<char> 
{
    tokens(): std::ctype<char>(get_table()) {}

    static std::ctype_base::mask const* get_table()
    {
        typedef std::ctype<char> cctype;
        static const cctype::mask *const_rc= cctype::classic_table();

        static cctype::mask rc[cctype::table_size];
        std::memcpy(rc, const_rc, cctype::table_size * sizeof(cctype::mask));

        rc[','] = std::ctype_base::space; 
        rc[' '] = std::ctype_base::space; 
        return &rc[0];
    }
};

std::string s = "right way, wrong way, correct way";
std::stringstream ss(s);
ss.imbue(std::locale(std::locale(), new tokens()));
std::istream_iterator<std::string> begin(ss);
std::istream_iterator<std::string> end;
std::vector<std::string> vstrings(begin, end);
std::copy(vstrings.begin(), vstrings.end(), std::ostream_iterator<std::string>(std::cout, "\n"));

Output:

right
way
wrong
way
correct
way

Online Demo : http://ideone.com/aKL0m

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3  
+1: Very nice.. –  Oliver Charlesworth Apr 9 '11 at 20:23
    
std::vector<std::string> vstrings(begin, end); would be nicer IMO, but I suppose we don't know whether the questioner is constructing the vector, or hoping to populate a pre-existing vector. –  Steve Jessop Apr 9 '11 at 20:28
    
Nice, but wrong. The OP was specific in that both space and comma are delimeters. And you can't do the same trick in this case, can you? –  Armen Tsirunyan Apr 9 '11 at 20:32
    
@Steve: Nice suggestion. @Armen: OP didn't mention anything when I gave the solution. The question doesn't seem to be clear enough. Otherwise there're some elegant ways to deal with both space and comma simultenously: stackoverflow.com/questions/4888879/… –  Nawaz Apr 9 '11 at 20:34
1  
This is an amazing answer and needs to be highlighted somehow. –  Samveen Apr 1 '13 at 11:07

A convenient way would be boost's string algorithms library.

std::vector<std::string> words;
std::string s;
boost::split(words, s, boost::is_any_of(", "), boost::token_compress_on);
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1  
Now THIS is the correct answer –  Armen Tsirunyan Apr 9 '11 at 20:33
    
I thought I wouldn't be able to find a one-liner answer to this... thanks. –  therin Aug 31 '12 at 1:51
    
That was severely cool.. –  Cupidvogel May 21 at 21:28
1  
#include <boost/algorithm/string/classification.hpp> #include <boost/algorithm/string/split.hpp> –  mirosval Jul 29 at 9:01

If the string has both spaces and commas you can use the string class function

found_index = myString.find_first_of(delims_str, begin_index) 

in a loop. Checking for != npos and inserting into a vector. If you prefer old school you can also use C's

strtok() 

method.

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