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How to improve my attempt:

class gotClass {
    protected $alpha;
    protected $beta;
    protected $gamma;
    (...)

    function __construct($arg1, $arg2, $arg3, $arg4) {
        $this->alpha = $arg1;
        $this->beta = $arg2;
        $this->gamma = $arg3;
        (...)
    }
}

to something nice and compact like (edited in response to comments)

class gotClass {
        protected $alpha;
        protected $beta;
        protected $gamma;
        (...)

    function __construct($alpha, $beta, $gamma) {
        $functionArguments = func_get_args();
        $className = get_called_class();
        $classAttributes = get_class_vars($className);
        foreach ($functionArguments as $arg => $value)
            if (array_key_exists($arg, $classAttributes))
                $this->$arg = $value;
}

I can't get it work, I don't know the right functions to use. Did I mention I'm new to PHP? Your help is much much appreciated.

EDIT: The field names do not conform to any pattern as the unedited post may have suggested. So their names cannot be constructed in some field[i]-like loop. My apologies for being unclear.

share|improve this question
1  
This is probably better suited for Code Review.SE. – user113292 Apr 9 '11 at 20:44
    
-> should be => in the foreach statement – Tim Cooper Apr 9 '11 at 20:48
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Edit after comments: PHP's lack of support for named arguments (that would fix this problem altogether) is a much-lamented thing. In my experience, as long as there is no native solution to the problem, it is indeed better to declare each parameter separately for the purposes of automatic document generation and the lookup function in your IDE. The IDE can show the expected parameters only if they are explicitly declared.

See this SO question for another popular workaround to the issue.

If you need to do this anyway, you need func_get_args() to retrieve all arguments passed to the constuctor, and an array to map the property names.

Something like

private $fields = array("alpha", "beta", "gamma");

function __construct()
 { 
   $args = func_get_args();
   foreach ($args as $index => $arg)
    { $this->{($this->fields[index])} = $arg; }
 }

this is not doing any checks on whether the specified variable exists - maybe add some more detail about what checks you exactly need.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer, but I should have mentioned the fields have non-sequential names so "field".($index+1) won't work. I've edited my question to reflect this. – Mansiemans Apr 9 '11 at 21:07
1  
@Lou how would you map the arguments to the names then? – Pekka 웃 Apr 9 '11 at 21:53
    
That's what I was hoping I could do dynamically. Say if func_get_args() would not just return argument values, but also their names (as set by the constructor definition), I could just check against the classAttributes to see if a corresponding field exists and set it. However, func_get_args() only returns values, so that method won't work. I'm trying to get this to work so the __construct method can be used in any class, and also with an unlimited amount of class fields, without having to hardcode every single field name into the constructor. – Mansiemans Apr 10 '11 at 8:45
    
@Lou hmm, in that case, you'd have to employ an array hard-coded in the object definition mapping the field name to each position. That's the only way to do that that I can think of. – Pekka 웃 Apr 10 '11 at 8:49
    
As a newbie, I guess my question is if you would prefer that to hardcoding the field names in the constructor? (I'm thinking of classes with tons of fields that need to be set by the constructor) – Mansiemans Apr 10 '11 at 9:54

You have a syntax error, this

foreach ($args as $arg -> $value)

Should be

foreach ($args as $arg => $value)

In the first example you would need to call

new gotClass($a, $b, $c)

But in your second example your expecting one array as a parameter so you would need to do

new gotClass(array($a, $b, $c))

You may want to refector and use func_get_args(), using this will mean the following format will still work

new gotClass($a, $b, $c) 

function __construct() {
    $className = get_called_class();
    $classAttributes = get_class_vars($className);
    foreach (func_get_args() as $arg -> $value)
        if (array_key_exists($arg, $classAttributes))
            $this->$arg = $value;
}
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