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In C++0X, I want to write generic caller/callback functions using variadic templates. First hurdle: The callees are member functions. So far so good. Second hurdle: There are many overloaded member functions of the same name.

How would I solve this? My primary reference is this fine article, but I can't quite make it work.

OK, let's dive in:

Class Foo
{
    void bar(int ID, int, int) { ... }
    void bar(int ID) { ... }
    void bar(int ID, double, float, void(Baz::*)()) const { /* jikes */ }

    template<typename ... Args>
    void sendBarToID_15(std::function<void(int, Args...)> refB, Args ... args)
    {
        refB(15, args...);
    }

    void yum()
    {
        sendBarToID_15(&Foo::bar, this, 17, 29); // want first version
    }
};

However, I cannot compile the call in yum() because the overload prevents template resolution. According to the referenced article, I should explicitly create a function object

f = magic::make_function<help, me>(&Foo::bar)

and then leisurely call sendBarToID_15(f, this, 17, 29).

  1. How can I make this work?

  2. Bonus points for std::bind magic that obviates "this" in the last line.

  3. Extra bonus points for making 15 parametric in a useful way.

Lots of thanks!!

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4 Answers

Is this what you're looking for?

#include <functional>
#include <iostream>

class Baz;

class Foo
{
    void bar(int ID, int, int) { std::cout << "here\n"; }
    void bar(int ID) { /*...*/ }
    void bar(int ID, double, float, void(Baz::*)()) const { /* jikes */ }

    template<int ID, typename ... Args>
    void sendBarToID(std::function<void(int, Args...)> refB, Args&& ... args)
    {
        refB(ID, std::forward<Args>(args)...);
    }

public:
    void yum()
    {
        using namespace std::placeholders;
        void (Foo::*mfp)(int, int, int) = &Foo::bar;
        sendBarToID<15>(std::function<void(int, int, int)>
            (std::bind(mfp, this, _1, _2, _3)), 17, 29); // want first version
    }
};

int main()
{
    Foo foo;
    foo.yum();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Looking good, will test that in a minute... Is there any way to avoid the explicit function pointer mfp and use some magic STL container for that, std::mem_fun or something like that? –  Kerrek SB Apr 10 '11 at 0:59
    
I think somehow, somewhere, you need to specify the overload you want with a signature. Whether that is done in yum explicitly or somewhere else (maybe implicitly) is probably negotiable. I unfortunately do not know enough about your design constraints to suggest anything at this time. –  Howard Hinnant Apr 10 '11 at 1:45
    
I just meant something that avoids writing pointers, like std::mem_fun<void(int, int, int)> f = &Foo::bar -- essentially the same thing, just wrapped up somehow... but this is already looking very good. –  Kerrek SB Apr 10 '11 at 1:59
    
Ah, so something very odd happened. In my real case, the types aren't all ints, but rather I have something like void bar(int ID, const Zip &, char). Then I have an object Zip z;, but I cannot just call sendBarToID<15>(....., z, 'a'), but instead I have to explicitly cast z, i.e. I call sendBarToID<15>(....., (const Zip &)(z), 'a'). How strange. –  Kerrek SB Apr 10 '11 at 2:25
    
Anyway, it's still sort of annoying that I have to spell out the function signature twice. You'd think that once should be enough to specify which overload I want... The call to std::bind should definitely be able to infer the template parameters for mfp. –  Kerrek SB Apr 10 '11 at 2:26
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You are trying to call bar with the following arguments in order : 15, this, 17, 29.

You want : this, 15, 17, 29

template<typename ... Args>
void sendBarToID_15(std::function<void(int, Args...)> refB, Args ... args)
{
    refB(15, args...);
}

So &Foo::bar can't be a std::function

If you can use lambda I'd use :

 void yum()
 {
    // EDITED: was "Foo* t"
    // (I don't remember of capture works with this, you may not need this)
    Foo* p = this;
    sendBarToID_15([p](int x, int y, int z){ p->bar(x, y, z); }, 17, 29);
 }

if you can't implement it with an helper class:

class helper {
private:
   Foo* p;
public:
   [...]
   void operator(int x, int y, int z) {
      p->bar(x,y,z);
   }
}

or using bind:

// EDITED: wrong return type was used
void (Fred::*f)(char x, float y) = &Foo::bar;
sendBarToID_15(std::bind(f, this, std::placeholders::_1, std::placeholders::_2, std::placeholders::_3), 17, 29);
share|improve this answer
    
Hmmmm....1) Why can't &Foo::bar be a std::function? 2) What is Foo* t for? 3) Helper class is not feasible, I will have lots of things like "foo" and can't write a helper for each. 4) How can &Foo::bar convert to a int(Fred::*)(char, float)? Otherwise that's similar to the previous answer, I shall test that! –  Kerrek SB Apr 10 '11 at 1:10
    
"How can &Foo::bar convert to a int(Fred::*)(char, float)?" : Indeed there was a problem in the signature –  ysdx Apr 10 '11 at 6:16
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

To follow up Howard's fine answer, let me just state that in the end I conclude that making the sendBarToID function templated doesn't really improve the logic of the setup in the way I had hoped. Since we have to bind() anyway, there's no reason to first bind and then unbind placeholders, we might as well just bind everything right in place. Here's the non-templated version:

void sendBarToID_15(std::function<void(int)> f)
{
    f(15);
}

void yum()
{
    // No avoiding this in the presence of overloads
    void (Foo::*mfp)(int, int, int) = &Foo::bar;

    sendBarToID_15(std::bind(mfp, this, std::placeholder::_1, 17, 29));
}

I was hoping that the variadic template solution could somehow make the client code simpler, but now I don't see how it can get any simpler than this. Variadic #define macros take care of the rest.

Thank you for the contributions!

Update: OK, here's what I finally came up with, thanks to preprocessor macros:

#include <functional>
#include <iostream>

class Baz;

class Foo
{
    void bar(int ID, const int &, int)
    { std::cout << "v1 called with ID " << ID << "\n"; }
    void bar(int ID)
    { std::cout << "v2 called with ID " << ID << "\n"; }
    void bar(int ID, double, float, void(Baz::*)()) const
    { std::cout << "v3 called with ID " << ID << "\n"; }

    void innocent(int ID, double)
    { std::cout << "innocent called with ID " << ID << "\n"; }

    void very_innocent(int ID, double) const
    { std::cout << "very innocent called with ID " << ID << "\n"; }

    template<int ID> void sendBarToID(std::function<void(int)> refB) { refB(ID); }
    template<int ID> void sendConstBarToID(std::function<void(int)> refB) const { refB(ID); }

#define MAKE_CALLBACK(f, ...) std::bind(&Foo::f, this, std::placeholders::_1, __VA_ARGS__)
#define MAKE_EXPLICIT_CALLBACK(g, ...) std::bind(g, this, std::placeholders::_1, __VA_ARGS__)

#define MAKE_SIGNED_CALLBACK(h, SIGNATURE, ...) MAKE_EXPLICIT_CALLBACK(static_cast<void (Foo::*)SIGNATURE>(&Foo::h), __VA_ARGS__)
#define MAKE_CONST_SIGNED_CALLBACK(h, SIGNATURE, ...) MAKE_EXPLICIT_CALLBACK(static_cast<void (Foo::*)SIGNATURE const>(&Foo::h), __VA_ARGS__)

public:
    void gobble()
    {
      double q = .5;
      int    n = 2875;
      void(Baz::*why)();

      sendBarToID<5>(MAKE_CALLBACK(innocent, q));
      sendConstBarToID<7>(MAKE_CALLBACK(very_innocent, q));
      // sendBarToID<11>(MAKE_SIGNED_CALLBACK(bar, (int))); // can't do, too much commas
      sendBarToID<13>(MAKE_SIGNED_CALLBACK(bar, (int, const int &, int), n, 1729));
      sendConstBarToID<17>(MAKE_CONST_SIGNED_CALLBACK(bar, (int, double, float, void(Baz::*)()), q, q, why));
    }

    void yum() const
    {
      double q = .5;
      int    n = 2875;
      void(Baz::*why)();

      sendConstBarToID<2>(MAKE_CALLBACK(very_innocent, q));
      // sendBarToID<-1>(MAKE_CALLBACK(innocent, q)); // Illegal in const function

      sendConstBarToID<3>(MAKE_CONST_SIGNED_CALLBACK(bar, (int, double, float, void(Baz::*)()), q, q, why));
    }
 };

int main()
{
    Foo foo;
    foo.yum();
    foo.gobble();
}

There is one inconvenience: I need to define two separate functions and macros for constant and non-constant member functions. Also, I can't handle the empty argument list (Foo::bar(int)).

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Use a lambda function- this kind of thing isn't necessary anymore.

class Foo
{
    void bar(int ID, int, int) { ... }
    void bar(int ID) { ... }
    void bar(int ID, double, float, void(Baz::*)()) const { /* jikes */ }

    template<typename ... Args>
    void sendBarToID_15(std::function<void(int, Args...)> refB, Args ... args)
    {
        refB(15, args...);
    }

    void yum()
    {
        sendBarToID_15([&, this](int i) {
            this->bar(i, 17, 29);
        });
    }
};
share|improve this answer
    
Which compilers support this? I think GCC 4.4 does not. Also, does the sendBarToID_15 still need to be variadic with that construction? The lambda always has fixed signature now. –  Kerrek SB Apr 10 '11 at 16:35
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