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Let's say I am writing code at the main page level and 2 dependencies require the same instance of an object and also state that as a dependency. What is the appropriate way to go about this?

Basically what I want to do is say, "If this dependency isn't loaded... then load it. Otherwise, use the same instance that was already loaded and just pass that one."

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up vote 51 down vote accepted

You would make that a module-level variable. For example,

// In foo.js
define(function () {
    var theFoo = {};

    return {
        getTheFoo: function () { return theFoo; }
    };
});

// In bar.js
define(["./foo"], function (foo) {
    var theFoo = foo.getTheFoo(); // save in convenience variable

    return {
        setBarOnFoo: function () { theFoo.bar = "hello"; }
    };
}

// In baz.js
define(["./foo"], function (foo) {
    // Or use directly.
    return {
        setBazOnFoo: function () { foo.getTheFoo().baz = "goodbye"; }
    };
}

// In any other file
define(["./foo", "./bar", "./baz"], function (foo, bar, baz) {
    bar.setBarOnFoo();
    baz.setBazOnFoo();

    assert(foo.getTheFoo().bar === "hello");
    assert(foo.getTheFoo().baz === "goodbye");
};
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1  
That's implementing globals without globals. Now you can write to the global foo object anywhere you want. – Raynos Apr 10 '11 at 0:00
3  
@Raynos: false; it's implementing the singleton pattern, which is object-oriented programming's method of solving the problems that global variables solve in procedural languages. – Domenic Apr 10 '11 at 0:02
8  
Furthermore, it does not pollute the global namespace. It is only available to those modules that explicitly state foo as a dependency. – Domenic Apr 10 '11 at 0:02
1  
@Raynos It sounds like you have an issue with RequireJS's module system and JavaScript's expando-property nature, then, rather then the particular solution I am giving here. The OP specifically requests bar and baz to both have access to "the same instance of an object." – Domenic Apr 10 '11 at 0:13
1  
I think this is what I want. I don't want to manipulate the state of foo, but that's okay. I will play with this idea and let you know how it works. The reason I need this singleton is because I have a message service that has notify() and listen() methods... but two different dependencies need to access the same message service so they can talk to each other without having hard-wired dependencies. I will report back ;) – egervari Apr 10 '11 at 0:59

Just provide an API for your singleton as you would.

And make sure its lazily loaded. The easiest way is to use an abstraction library like underscore that supplies cross browser helpers. Other options are ES5 Object.defineProperty or custom getter/setters.

In this case _.once ensures that constructor's result is cached after the first call, it basically lazy loads it.

define(function() {
    var constructor = _.once(function() { 
        ...
    });

    return {
        doStuffWithSingleton: function() {
            constructor().doStuff();
        }
    };

});

_.once from underscore.

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Will not work in IE < 9. – Domenic Apr 10 '11 at 0:20
    
@Domenic it will work if you use _.once. I actually recommend _.once or your own lazy loading getters if you cannot use ES5. – Raynos Apr 10 '11 at 0:21
    
I see what you mean. But you can still do foo.lazyloaded.bar = "not me" in the baz module; using a constructor function instead of theFoo = {} really doesn't solve any problems, although of course it is more powerful if the OP does indeed require an object constructed in that fashion. – Domenic Apr 10 '11 at 0:25
    
@Domenic I realised that was an issue. So I changed my answer to not actually give access to lazily loaded object since that is making it too public. – Raynos Apr 10 '11 at 0:29
    
excellent :). So now I think we have things covered... your answer gives a better best-practices solution, whereas mine covers the OP's specific (if perhaps misguided) request for "the same instance of an object." – Domenic Apr 10 '11 at 0:47

Combining Raynos's concerns about encapsulation with the OP's clarification that he wants to expose a couple of methods on a messaging service, this is I think the right way to go about it:

// In messagingServiceSingleton.js
define(function () {
    var messagingService = new MessagingService();

    return {
        notify: messagingService.listen.bind(messagingService),
        listen: messagingService.notify.bind(messagingService)
    };
});

// In bar.js
define(["./messagingServiceSingleton"], function (messagingServiceSingleton) {
    messagingServiceSingleton.listen(/* whatever */);
}

// In baz.js
define(["./messagingServiceSingleton"], function (messagingServiceSingleton) {
    messagingServiceSingleton.notify(/* whatever */);
}

Function.prototype.bind will not be present in all browsers, so you would need to include a polyfill like the one Mozilla provides.

An alternate (and in my opinion probably better) approach would be to make the messaging service object itself a module. This would look something like

// In messagingService.js
define(function () {
    var listenerMap = {};

    function listen(/* params */) {
        // Modify listenerMap as appropriate according to params.
    }
    function notify(/* params */) {
        // Use listenerMap as appropriate according to params.
    }

    return {
        notify: notify
        listen: listen
    };
});

Since you expose the same notify and listen methods to everyone who uses your module, and those always refer to the same private listenerMap variable, this should do what you want. It also obviates the need for Function.prototype.bind, and gets rid of the rather-unnecessary distinction between the messaging service itself and the module which enforces singleton usage of it.

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Any reason to prefer obj.f.bind(obj) vs function() { obj.f(); }. Also an abstraction like {_.bindAll(obj)](documentcloud.github.com/underscore/#bindAll) is great for these cases. – Raynos Apr 10 '11 at 13:08
    
@Raynos: no great reason, except that if you are using a native version of it then the intermediate function won't show up in the stack trace while debugging. And I guess it will probably be slightly faster, but of course that's just micro-optimization. – Domenic Apr 10 '11 at 18:09

Here's a version where the module itself is the shared variable instead of a variable within that module.

define('foo', [], {bar: "this text will be overwritten"});

define('bar', ["foo"], function (foo) {
    return {
        setBarOnFoo: function () { foo.bar = "hello"; }
    };
});

define('baz', ["foo"], function (foo) {
    return {
        setBazOnFoo: function () { foo.baz = "goodbye"; }
    };
});

require(["foo", "bar", "baz"], function (foo, bar, baz) {
    bar.setBarOnFoo();
    baz.setBazOnFoo();

    $('#results').append(foo.bar + ' ' + foo.baz);
});​​​

// reads: hello goodbye
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As a variation of Domenic's answer, you can use the 'exports' magic module to automatically generate a reference for the module -- "Properties added to the exports object will be on the public interface of the module, no need to return any value." This avoids having to call the getTheFoo() function to obtain a reference.

// In foo.js
define(['exports'], function (foo) {
   foo.thereCanBeOnlyOne = true; 
});

// In bar.js
define(["exports", "./foo"], function (bar, foo) {
  bar.setBarOnFoo = function () { foo.bar = "hello"; };
});

// in baz.js
define(["exports", "./foo"], function (baz, foo) {
  baz.setBazOnFoo = function () { foo.baz = "goodbye"; };
});

// In any other file
define(["./foo", "./bar", "./baz"], function (foo, bar, baz) {
  bar.setBarOnFoo();
  baz.setBazOnFoo();

  assert(foo.bar === "hello");
  assert(foo.baz === "goodbye");
  assert(foo.thereCanBeOnlyeOne);
});

To address the comment below, I personally have found the above convention to be useful. Your mileage may vary, but feel free to adopt the convention if you think it is useful. The convention boils down to these two rules:

  • Declare 'exports' as the first dependency in the define array.
  • Name the parameter in the function after the JavaScript file.

Using the name of file, e.g. for foo.js name the variable 'foo', increases the readability of the code as most developers will define 'foo' as the parameter for the foo.js dependency. When scanning the code or using grep, it is easy to find all references to 'foo' use both inside and outside the module and it makes it easy to pick out what the module is exposing to the public. For example, renaming bar.setBarOnFoo to bar.setFooBar is much easier if the declaration in the bar.js module mirrors the usage in other files. A simple search and replace of bar.setBarOnFoo to bar.setFooBar across all files will accomplish the task.

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If you use the exports module, you should really give it the name exports in the parameters of your anonymous function? Why? Convention. 99.998...% of the code out there that uses the exports mechanism follows the convention. Setting yourself against it makes your code harder to read. Actually, the exports module exists solely to support convention: namely, the CommonJS module idiom. There's no compelling reason to use exports unless you want to use this idiom, which you do not use in your example code. – Louis Feb 3 at 8:34

I was in this scenario:

For different reasons I needed to call a function that was on a requirejs module, but the click that fired that call was out of require.

The way I fixed this was creating a requirejs modure that writes over the window object.

define("one", [], function() {
    window.popupManager = (function () {
            console.log ('aca');

        var popUpManager = function () {
            self = this;

            self.CallMe = function ()
            {
                alert ('someone calls');
            };
        };
        return new popUpManager();
    })();
});
require(['one']);

window.popupManager.CallMe();

This way if any piece of code that is out of the require spectrum (I know it shouldn't be this way) can call functions of this require that writes over the window object.

I really know this is not an "elegant" solution, but it may help you in case of an emergency.

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