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There's probably a more efficient and more Ruby-ish way to do this:

# Pad array to size n by adding x's. Don't do anything if n <= a.length.
def padleft(a, n, x)
  return a if n <= a.length
  return padleft([x] + a, n, x)
end

What would you suggest?

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up vote 20 down vote accepted

Edited due to my misunderstanding of the question. Pervious version of my answer padded from the right side, but the question was asking to do it from the left side. I corrected it accordingly. This is due to naming convention. ljust, rjust are builtin methods for String, and I extended that convention to Array, but that corresponds to padright and padleft, respectively, in the terminology of the question.

Destructive methods

def padleft!(a, n, x)
  a.insert(0, *Array.new([0, n-a.length].max, x))
end
def padright!(a, n, x)
  a.fill(x, a.length...n)
end

It would be more natural to have it defined on Array class:

class Array
  def rjust!(n, x); insert(0, *Array.new([0, n-length].max, x)) end
  def ljust!(n, x); fill(x, length...n) end
end

Non-destructive methods

def padleft(a, n, x)
  Array.new([0, n-a.length].max, x)+a
end
def padright(a, n, x)
  a.dup.fill(x, a.length...n)
end

or

class Array
  def rjust(n, x); Array.new([0, n-length].max, x)+self end
  def ljust(n, x); dup.fill(x, length...n) end
end
share|improve this answer
    
+1. I forgot about fill. – the Tin Man Apr 10 '11 at 1:04

Using 10 for the length to pad to, and 'x' to be what you're padding to, this pads right:

>> asdf = %w[0 1 2 3 ] #=> ["0", "1", "2", "3"]
>> asdf += (asdf.size < 10) ? ['x'] * (10 - asdf.size) : [] #=> ["0", "1", "2", "3", "x", "x", "x", "x", "x", "x"]

or

>> asdf = (asdf.size < 10) ? ['x'] * (10 - asdf.size) + asdf : asdf #=> ["x", "x", "x", "x", "x", "x", "0", "1", "2", "3"]

to padleft

If it makes sense to you to monkey-patch Array:

class Array
  def pad_right(s, char=nil)
    self + [char] * (s - size) if (size < s)
  end

  def pad_left(s, char=nil)
    (size < s) ? [char] * (s - size) + self : self
  end
end

%w[1 2 3].pad_right(5, 'x') # => ["1", "2", "3", "x", "x"]
%w[1 2 3].pad_left(5, 'x') # => ["x", "x", "1", "2", "3"]
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FWIW:

def rpad(item, padding, num)
  Array(item).fill padding, Array(item).size, num
end
# rpad "initialize value(s)", 0, 3
# => ["initialize value(s)", 0, 0, 0]
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Using the * operator to repeat a list.

# Pad array to size n by adding x's. Don't do anything if n <= a.length.
def padleft(a, n, x)
  return a if n <= a.length
  return [x] * (n - a.length) + a
end
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Woops. Good call on the edit :) – Ken Rockot Apr 10 '11 at 0:52

Perhaps more Rubyish ;)

# Pad array to size n by adding x's. Don't do anything if n <= a.length.
def padleft(a, n, x)
  (n - a.size).times.inject(a) do |array, i|
    array << x
  end
end
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If you're using Rails and want the padding on the right:

[1,2,3,4,5,6].in_groups_of(4)
=> [[1, 2, 3, 4], [5, 6, nil, nil]]

This doesn't come anywhere near answering the question but it's what I ended up needing after visiting this page. Hope it helps someone.

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Here's another fun one-liner to do it:

(non-destructive)

def padleft(a, n, x)
  a.dup.reverse.fill(x, a.length..n-1).reverse
end

(destructive)

def padleft(a, n, x)
  a.reverse.fill(x, a.length..n-1).reverse
end
share|improve this answer
    
Just curious, why the downvotes? Is this no longer a correct solution? – Topher Fangio Sep 15 '15 at 16:23
    
Sorry I intended to write a synopsis while downvoting, but some other thing came up. Reversing 2x should never be a correct solution when dealing with oft-used string functions. Code like this is the root of most slowdowns in open-source software. When there is code like this in a core string library, someone will rewrite it using a single reallocation and a loop to set the padding characters and brag about it on his/her blog. – nurettin Sep 22 '15 at 11:39
    
It may be inefficient, but this is attractive code nonetheless. When writing Ruby we often value poetry above practicality. As long as it's not done in a massive loop, I think we are good. – superluminary Jan 7 at 10:51

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