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I'm working on a Javascript library where I cannot pollute the global namespace, and there must contain all my variables within one or two global variables. I've currently run into a special case where I need to use closures, but what I usually try hasn't been working and it's been troubling me for some time. Searching has only yielded me the traditional closure method, which is what I usually use.

[...]
addFilters: function(filters) {
  for(filter in filters) {
    this.filters[filter] = filters[filter];
    this.Image.prototype[filter] = function() { //closures, how do they work?
      return (function(image, filter, arguments) {
        image.addQueue(filter, arguments);
      })(this, filter, arguments);
    };
  }
},
[...]

In the above snippet, the Image.prototype functions (and image.addQueue) don't correctly capture 'filter', and therefore it is set to the last filter in the for..in iteration every time.

Complete code here with relevant sections highlighted: http://pastebin.com/UVFTVPkh

Live demo: http://ian0.com/code/js/ube/demo.html

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You've got the factory function a bit wonky. You need to name its arguments, and the self-invocation is performed incorrectly. It's a lot more obvious if you just use a separate function to generate the function assigned to this.Image.prototype[filter].

function generateProtoFunc(image, filter, arguments) {
    return function(filter, arguments) {
        image.addQueue(filter, arguments);
    };
}

// snip...

for (filter in filters) {
    this.filters[filter] = filters[filter];
    this.Image.prototype[filter] = generateProtoFunc(this, filter, arguments);
}

Here's the right way to do it using immediate function invocation:

for (filter in filters) {
    this.filters[filter] = filters[filter];
    this.Image.prototype[filter] = (function(image, filter, arguments) {
        return function(filter, arguments) {
            image.addQueue(filter, arguments);
        };
    })(this, filter, arguments);
}
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This is how I've always done things, and I've never had this problem before. Could you show me what I'm doing wrong? –  Ian Farrell Apr 10 '11 at 0:57
    
Won't that produce the same result? I'm just simply avoiding using another constructor function by wrapping the anonymous function around parenthesis so I can immediately call it. –  Ian Farrell Apr 10 '11 at 1:00
    
@Ian: no, because you didn't write it correctly. I'll update my answer to show the difference. –  Matt Ball Apr 10 '11 at 1:01
    
Ah, I see what I was doing wrong now. Thanks. –  Ian Farrell Apr 10 '11 at 1:05

A closure is bound to the scope where it is declared, not to the specific values the variables in that scope had at the moment of the declaration.
I'm explaining why your code didn't work. And by knowing the why, you'll see there is a simpler way to do this.
All those functions you declare in each FOR loop are bound to the same scope (the addFilters function scope) so when the closures are executed they read the variables from the same scope and so they get the same values.
Hence the key here is to bind each closure to a different scope, and that's what you do by wrapping the closures in an anonymous function: i.e. you are creating a unique scope for each closure.

But... do you need a anonymous function invocation in order to create a scope?
The answer is NO.
You can create a scope in a much readable way by using the with statement.

Here is your code using that approach:

[...]
addFilters: function(filters) {
    for(filter in filters) {
        this.filters[filter] = filters[filter] ;
        with({ _filter: filter }) // with this you create a new scope with the local variable `_filter` holding the value of `filter`
            this.Image.prototype[filter] = function(image, arguments){ image.addQueue(_filter, arguments) } ; // and this closure is bound to the new scope
    }
},
[...]

The varaibles image and arguments are parameters of the closure so you dont need to add them to the new scope. You pass those value once you actually execute the closures.

Also, you dont need to name the _filter variable differently. You can just name it filter and it will just shadow the outter scope's filter.

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Interesting approach, but I've heard that with()'s functionality is inconsistent across browsers. –  Ian Farrell Apr 12 '11 at 19:56
    
I haven't heard that. I've done this many times for public websites and it's always worked fine. –  GetFree Apr 13 '11 at 15:31

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