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These codes seem to work the same way:

Hello world

(
    function(a)
    {
        alert(a);
    }
)('Hello');

Another hello world

(
    function(a)
    {
        alert(a);
    }('Hello')
);

Is there any differences actually?

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1  
We have a habit at my job of calling this an "innie" (second option) vs. and "outie" (first option). And we prefer "outie" by and large since the parens are intended as a marker on the function to imply the execution, not contain the execution itself. –  Gabriel Apr 10 '11 at 5:36

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

No. Given the code exactly as you've posted it, there is no effective difference. Both forms construct the same anonymous function and subsequently call that function with the same argument.

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Thanks! This makes me confused... and I like the first writing style anyway :) –  Japboy Apr 10 '11 at 3:57
3  
For the record, Douglas Crockford — and by extension, JSLint — prefers the second style. ("Move the invocation into the parens that contain the function.") –  davidchambers Apr 10 '11 at 4:02
    
@davidchambers: Indeed. A completely pointless distinction for JSLint to make, in my view. –  Tim Down Apr 10 '11 at 20:34

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