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I do this:

a = [1,2,3,4]  
b = [2,3,4,5]  
c = b - a  
put c 

I get this answer -> [1]
I want this answer -> [1,1,1,1] (like matrix addition/subtraction)

I tried this:

c.each {|e| c[e] = b[e] - a[e]}  

but I get this answer: [1,0,0,0]

Can someone give me a correct way to do this? Thanks a lot!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 11 down vote accepted

You could use zip:

a.zip(b).map { |x, y| y - x }
# => [1, 1, 1, 1]

There is also a Matrix class:

require "matrix"

a = Matrix[[1, 2, 3, 4]]
b = Matrix[[2, 3, 4, 5]]
c = b - a
# => Matrix[[1, 1, 1, 1]]
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot. I converted everything to a matrix. One more question. What would I use to automate constructing and then filling a matrix? I used array1 = Array.new(hi) {|e| e = 0} to construct and fill a user defined array with 0's. Is there a similar command for matrices? Thanks again! –  subyman Apr 10 '11 at 4:17
    
@subyman array1=Array.new(hi, 0) would be simpler. –  sawa Apr 10 '11 at 4:20
    
@subyman Matrix.build might be what you're looking for. Check the doc for mor info. There are a number of methods though. –  Andy Apr 10 '11 at 4:23
    
@sawa Thanks, but I'm trying to apply this to matrices now. –  subyman Apr 10 '11 at 4:25
    
@Andy I will play around with those. Thanks a lot for your help. –  subyman Apr 10 '11 at 4:25

You can use each_with_index and map.

 c = b.each_with_index.map { |n,i| n - a[i] }
 # => [1, 1, 1, 1]
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This works fine in Ruby 1.8 too. –  Todd Yandell Apr 10 '11 at 4:11
    
Thanks, I keep forgetting what was added in 1.9. –  Andy Apr 10 '11 at 4:13

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