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What's the difference between JS's "File" and "new File" constructors for a new file?

I.e., what's the difference between:

var f = File("C:/myfile.txt");

and

var f = new File("C:/myfile.txt");

Thanks in advance!

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Does the first way actually work? –  tcooc Apr 10 '11 at 7:50
1  
There is a difference in how a function works with or without new but since File isn't part of the JS language (it must be an object provided by your host environment or a library) then whether or not that has a practical difference depends on the implementation of it. Where are you getting this File object from? –  Quentin Apr 10 '11 at 7:51
    
@David Dorward, the File object is actually part of the javascript/DOM in a browser, but it cannot be instantiated by a script (due to security concerns). –  tcooc Apr 10 '11 at 7:53

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

There is no File object in ECMAScript-262.

Maybe you mean the File object of ExtendedScript (Adobe CS)?

File ([path]); //can return a Folder object
new File ([path]); //always returns a File object

Source: JavaScriptToolsGuide_CS5

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It exists in HTML5 as well.. –  Shadow Wizard Apr 10 '11 at 10:11
    
Thanks! I am indeed using Adobe's ES; didn't know that wasn't standard JS (Is it in HTML5 as Shadow says?). However, your source link appears broken to me.. –  Sella Rafaeli Apr 12 '11 at 12:29
    
@Sella: yeah, link seems to be broken now. It wasn't at the time checking (even Google still lists it ^^). Here's another one. And for your side question: yes there is a File object in HTML5, but afaik it is bound to <input type="file" /> objects and non-scriptable. –  Jürgen Thelen Apr 13 '11 at 9:28

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