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I developed an open source software using CeCILL-B license (french BSD like) now I'm leaving the institution where I coded the project and owns the rights. I want to fork that project to continue the development but hosting on a public server without institutional logins and so on. I want to evolve the code of some modules already implemented and create new ones but using an license internationally known (BSD or Apache), but I'm don't know if I can copy the sources an publish with other license the modifications and/or original sources.

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I would first seek advice from the institution on the matter. If the advice given is not favorable and you wish to press the matter, then go seek the advice of a legal professional ;-) The answer depends on (at least) the exact terms of the CeCILL-B license and jurisdiction. –  user166390 Apr 10 '11 at 8:48
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Read the original license, specifically 5.3.2 and 5.3.2. cecill.info/licences/Licence_CeCILL-B_V1-en.html –  Simon Svensson Apr 10 '11 at 8:51
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2 Answers

Do you own the copyright of all the files? If you can get approval from all the copyright owners, you can change the license, although this change will not be retroactive (i.e. previous versions of the code will still be under the old license; only new versions of the code will be under the new license).

If not, you can change the license to one that is 'compatible', i.e. that respects all the restrictions of the original license. The logic behind this is that new versions are a derived work. As such, they are under the restriction of the original license, but the new work can have additional restrictions.

Can you give the exact change you would like to apply: from which CeCill license to which license?

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I want to change from CeCILL-B to one of these: BSD or Apache. –  jrbalderrama Apr 12 '11 at 13:21
    
As far as I remember, CeCILL-B has an attribution clause, so you cannot convert it to BSD (if by BSD you mean 'modern BSD', or 3 clause BSD) without the authorization of copyright holders. You might want to check this, however. –  Gael Varoquaux Apr 12 '11 at 14:42
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The question as you asked it leaves open a lot of questions. As commenting would not be fitting I'll try it in form of an answer. You can try to answer as many questions as possible which will help to lead to an answer.


I developed an open source software using CeCILL-B license (french BSD like) now I'm leaving the institution where I coded the project and owns the rights.

  • Q-1. Who owns the copyright? That's not entirely clear the way you write it. Is it you or the institution? Can you provide the complete copyright message / header of the software?
  • Q-2. Have you licensed the software under CeCILL-B to the institution you're leaving or owns the institution the software and has licensed it under CeCILL-B to you?
  • Q-3. Has the software been released by the institution to the public or to a third party that can pass on the software to you?

I want to fork that project to continue the development but hosting on a public server without institutional logins and so on.

I think that part is very well understandable and your motivation is clear. You're aiming for an independent development apart from the original project. That's why we fork for if we fork.

I want to evolve the code of some modules already implemented and create new ones but using an license internationally known (BSD or Apache), but I'm don't know if I can copy the sources an[d] publish with other license the modifications and/or original sources.

I can understand your motivation. Not all developers know the CeCILL-B license. I must admit I'm part of that group and so that's a good question.

Assuming that you're allowed to use the code under the CeCILL-B Free Software License Agreement, I have to admit that it's a license I've heard for the first day.

I have not put any efforts to find out how accepted that license internationally is (which might be worth to know to make better decisions), but according to the self-description the intentions look very compatible to me on what is internationally known as "Free Software". And everything is documented in foreign languages as well which speaks for it's own:

CEA, CNRS and INRIA released CeCILL in july 2004. CeCILL is the first license defining the principles of use and dissemination of Free Software in conformance with French law, following the principles of the GNU GPL. This license is meant to be used by companies, research institutions and all organisations willing to release software under a GPL-like license while ensuring a standard level of legal safety. CeCILL is also perfectly suited to international projects.

(Links to english homepages by me, CeCILL stands for Ce(a) C(nrs) I(nria) L(ogiciel) L(ibre))

That's for the main idea behind CeCILL, and in specific for CeCILL-B:

CeCILL-B follows the principle of the popular BSD license and its variants (Apache, X11 or W3C among others). In exchange for strong citation obligations (in all software incorporating a program covered by CeCILL-B and also through a Web site), the author authorizes the reuse of its software without any other constraints.

That - to say at least - looks very promising to me that you can create a combined work of CeCILL and X11 (revised BSD) or Apache as long as you retain copyright notices. Like Apache 2.0 CeCILL-B has an anti-patent clause.

However, changing the license does not look possible to me if you're not the original author who owns the copyright. Granting other licenses is only possible for the original author(s).

So you need to keep notices for the parts in use where you are unable to relicense or you get in contact with the original author(s) and arrange something else.

You can offer contributors to provide code under any other compatible license. But you should offer contributors an easier guideline not to introduce too many licenses. See License proliferation for the general problems this can lead to. In the end you would have made the situation more worse even.

It might be easier solve problems by offering a FAQ in your project to deal with questions of potential contributors and by making your project's licensing position visible.

  • Q-4. Is CeCILL-B a license you find acceptable for contributions?
  • Q-5. Which License would you prefer for contributions?

I hope this feedback is helpful so far.

References of Institutions behind CeCILL

  • Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique - CEA, a public scientific, technical and industrial research establishment, having its principal place of business at 25 rue Leblanc, immeuble Le Ponant D, 75015 Paris, France.
  • Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - CNRS, a public scientific and technological establishment, having its principal place of business at 3 rue Michel-Ange, 75794 Paris cedex 16, France.
  • Institut National de Recherche en Informatique et en Automatique - INRIA, a public scientific and technological establishment, having its principal place of business at Domaine de Voluceau, Rocquencourt, BP 105, 78153 Le Chesnay cedex, France.
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Q-1: The institution owns the copyright I signed a document to produce the software to give all rights to the institution. Q-2: I defined the license as CeCILL-B. In fact, it is a public institution based on France. They owns the rights but I could define the license of the software Q-3 The software is part of a research project. It almost finished and the official site publish its availability as public and free. –  jrbalderrama Apr 12 '11 at 13:12
    
Q-4 CeCILL-B is acceptable in general terms however its french context and its restricted popularity are causes why I want to change the license of the code. Q-5 Sincerely I'm not sure, for conciseness and history BSD is a good option for me but I seems that Apache license it's better for official purposes. –  jrbalderrama Apr 12 '11 at 13:19
    
@thesaurus: If the instituation owns the full copyright (and you don't) you can ask them if you can obtain a license under Apache 2.0 as well. Then you can fork based on Apache 2.0. That looks like the nicest approach to me, it's in consent with everybody. Otherwise you can check compatbility between CeCILL-B and Apache 2.0. If they are compatbile and it's possible to release CeCILL-B code in an Apache 2.0 package, well then this looks fine as well to me. –  hakre Apr 21 '11 at 9:12
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