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In this example:

class A {
    public A() {
        // pre-init1
        // post-init1
    }
}

class B extends A {
    public B() {
        super();
        // init2
    }
}

I want to let init2 before init1, cuz super() must be occurred at the very beginning, so the only way is to add another init method:

class A {
    public A() {
        init();
    }

    protected void init() {
        // pre-init1
        // post-init1
    }
}

class B extends A {
    public B() {
        super();
    }

    protected void init() {
        // init2
        super.init();
    }
}

Can I get rid of init() method?

Or, I have to make final fields non-final. Or, is there any way to let A do post-init1 after init2, but not introduce init() method?

EDIT

Here the code from practice, well I think I need this special init() for the special case,

This is a base support class for Spring JUnit test, for some reasons I can't use the SpringJUnit4Runner from spring-test, so I created my own,

// wire the bean on demand.
public static <T> T selfWire(T bean) {
    if (bean == null)
        throw new NullPointerException("bean");

    ApplicationContext context = buildAnnotationDescribedContext(bean.getClass());
    AutowireCapableBeanFactory beanFactory = context.getAutowireCapableBeanFactory();
    beanFactory.autowireBean(bean);

    if (bean instanceof ApplicationContextAware) {
        ((ApplicationContextAware) bean).setApplicationContext(context);
    }
    if (bean instanceof InitializingBean) {
        try {
            ((InitializingBean) bean).afterPropertiesSet();
        } catch (RuntimeException e) {
            throw e;
        } catch (Exception e) {
            throw new RuntimeException("Failed to initialize bean", e);
        }
    }

    return bean;
}

@Import(TestContext.class)
public abstract class WiredTestCase 
        extends Assert
        implements InitializingBean {

    // ...

    public WiredTestCase() {
        init();
        ApplicationContextBuilder.selfWire(this);
        logger.debug("WiredTestCase wired");
    }

    protected void init() {
    }

    @Overrdie
    public void afterPropertiesSet() {
    }

}

@Import({ TestDaoConfig.class })
public class WiredDaoTestCase
        extends WiredTestCase {

    public WiredDaoTestCase() {
        // init... moved to init()
    }

    protected void init() {
        // Collect entity classes from @Using annotation
        // and config the session factory.
    }

}

@Using(IcsfIdentityUnit.class)
@ImportSamples(R_ACLSamples.class)
public class R_AuthorityTest
        extends WiredDaoTestCase {

    @Inject
    R_Authority authority;

    @Inject
    ScannedResourceRegistry registry;

    @Overrdie
    public void afterPropertiesSet() {
        // Do a lot of reflection discoveries.
        // ...
        super.afterPropertiesSet();
    }

    @Test
    public void testXxx() { ... }

    // ...
}

The code is very long, but the idea is simple, in R_AuthorityTest there are DAO beans to be injected, which depends on SessionFactory, and the session factory is configured in WiredDaoTestCase which is the base class of R_AuthorityTest. Despite of final fields, I have to initialize the session factory before WiredTestCase(). I can't initialize them just in static constructor, because I build the persistence unit on the fly from annotations on this.getClass(). So, personally, I think sometime it's reasonable to do some pre-init before super constructor, and maybe init method is the only way in this case?

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2  
What final fields? You have none in your code... –  thkala Apr 10 '11 at 9:12
    
Please show us a complete example of what you want to achieve. –  janhink Apr 10 '11 at 9:14

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Even in the second example, you'd need to make B.init() call super.init(), otherwise the logic of init1 wouldn't be executed at all.

I would try not to use this init approach - typically calling virtual methods in a constructor is a really bad idea. You haven't really explained why you need init2 to occur before init1 though... I suspect there's a better design available, but it's hard to suggest a way forward as we don't know what you're trying to do. For example, giving your superclass constructor take some parameters may well be the way forward - but we can't really say at the moment.

If you could give a more representative example (including the final fields you mention later) we could probably help you more.

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It's probably that the init() code has some global action, which is usually problematic (for reasons precisely as this). –  Jim Blackler Apr 10 '11 at 9:15
2  
@Jim: My guess is that init1() actually wants to use some of the values computed in init2(), which is why I'm suggesting constructor parameters - but we can't really tell for sure at the moment. –  Jon Skeet Apr 10 '11 at 9:16

A superclass constructor should be called first - you cannot have any statements before it, which makes sense, since it is necessary to instantiate the object before initializing it.

Using a separate method as you do is an acceptable work-around for this issue, if you cannot eliminate the need for it by redesigning your application.

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I wouldn't say that calling a virtual method from a constructor is a good workaround. It may occasionally be the only one available, but it should be avoided where possible. –  Jon Skeet Apr 10 '11 at 9:15
    
@Jon Skeet, agreed. I have only had to use it with some UI APIs to insert arbitrary objects before e.g. the text of a message box class. The problem was that to instantiate those objects I needed this to be available, which was a vicious circle. I might have been able to work around this by initializing the message box class lazily (thus moving those methods calls out of the constructor), but it would triple (or worse) the code size of the class... –  thkala Apr 10 '11 at 9:28

You mentioned final members, so I suggest you want to initialize them in a special order... But if we can't see the exact problem we can't give you fair answer.

Anyway, I just would like to point out that final member can get assigned only at two places (as far as I know).

  1. at the place where you declare them,
  2. or in a contructor context.

Any other attempt to assign a value to a final member will be compiler error.

I really would like to understand the origin of your questiuon and help. Could you provide more details?

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