Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I need to spawn a separate python process that runs a sub script.

For example:

main.py runs and prints some output to the console. It then spawns sub.py which starts a new process. Once main.py has spawned sub.py it should terminate whilst sub.py continues to run.

Thank you.

Edit:

When I run main.py it prints 'main.py' but nothing else and sub.py doesn't launch.

main.py

print "main.py"

import subprocess as sp
process=sp.Popen('sub.py', shell=True, stdout=sp.PIPE, stderr=sp.PIPE)
out, err = process.communicate(exexfile('sub.py'))  # The output and error streams

raw_input("Press any key to end.")

sub.py

print "sub.py"
raw_input("Press any key to end.")
share|improve this question
    
What operating system you are on? Do you launch main.py from some ide? – eat Apr 10 '11 at 12:37

execfile

The straightforward approach:

execfile('main.py')

Subprocess

Offers fine-grained control over input and output, can run processes in background:

import subprocess as sp
process=sp.Popen('other_file.py', shell=True, stdout=sp.PIPE, stderr=sp.PIPE)
out, err = process.communicate()  # The output and error streams.
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, though I can't get it to work. See my edit. – KeyPick Apr 10 '11 at 12:26
    
You need to enter data to the communicate method. Will edit my answer soon. – Adam Matan Apr 10 '11 at 12:42
    
Thanks. I've added exexfile('sub.py') to the communicate() method, and now it runs the sub.py file, but in the same console so how do you get it to run seperately? I'm probably missing something really simple, sorry. Thanks again. – KeyPick Apr 10 '11 at 13:09
    
>> Once main.py has spawned sub.py it should terminate whilst sub.py continues to run. – geowar Feb 22 '13 at 1:30

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.