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As I read here Lua has a self

How does an object reference itself in Lua?

But is it really self in the sense that WHATEVER THE CONTEXT self always refers to the object itself. Seems like a tautology but no consider the this keyword, it isn't self object it is rather the object WHERE the code is being executed.

Update: I'm not refering to javascript only but to all languages : this exists in js, .net java ... and is not semantically self (so these languages are not candidates) which should be INVARIANT (like in mathematical sense) whereas "this" is not invariant: it can change during the same execution flow.

My question is precisely support of real "self" keyword with INVARIANCE feature - don't answer workaround like closure :).

"KNOW THUSELF" is important not only for people but for Object. How can you do perfect encapsulation when object cannot self reference itself for sure ?

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closed as not a real question by Michael Easter, jgauffin, Decent Dabbler, Stephen C, dmckee Apr 10 '11 at 20:00

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Do you mean the this keyword in Javascript? –  syrion Apr 10 '11 at 12:53
    
Your question is a bit cryptic. What would you consider a "true self-reference keyword"? –  deceze Apr 10 '11 at 13:00
    
"... self always refers to the object itself." What object are we talking about here? Code is code; what sort of relationship between some code units (of what type?) and "objects" is at issue here? –  Pointy Apr 10 '11 at 13:01
    
How is this java, javascript, and .net? –  Eric Apr 10 '11 at 13:25
    
I'm not refering to javascript only but to all languages : this exists in js, .net java ... and is not semantically self. which should be INVARIANT whereas "this" is not invariant: it can change during the same execution flow. –  user310291 Apr 10 '11 at 13:43

2 Answers 2

In Javascript, the this keyword refers to whichever object the function belongs to. However, the problem is that the the functions change ownership. If for example you have this:

function Foo(a) {
    this.bar = a;
    this.baz = function() {
        alert(this.bar)
    }
}

var foo = new Foo("foobar");
foo.baz();
// Alerts "foobar"

var baz = foo.baz;
// Copy the method into the window object, changing its ownership

baz();
// Alerts "undefined"

var fixedBaz = baz.bind(foo);
fixedBaz();
// Alerts "foobar"

The member function changes its ownership at var baz = foo.baz;, so the this keyword points to the window object instead.

I think a better question is "How do I reference a member function of an object while maintaining the original this pointer".

EDIT:

You can use the function.bind method to lock the this pointer to a certain value.

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If I ask your question I'm pretty sure people are going to answer closure ;) Precisely I want simple "self" keyword not closure. –  user310291 Apr 10 '11 at 13:48
    
thanks for the example will look at it I have difficulty to imagine one because I got some in the past and I forgot. –  user310291 Apr 10 '11 at 13:50
    
@user310291: Updated –  Eric Apr 10 '11 at 13:56
    
function.bind never heard seems what I'm looking for thanks ! –  user310291 Apr 10 '11 at 14:01

I've been struggling to understand what you are talking about ... and I'm starting to think that is because what you are saying is nonsensical.

this exists in js, .net java ... and is not semantically self. which should be INVARIANT whereas "this" is not invariant: it can change during the same execution flow.

Yes. It is a fact that this will refer to different objects at different times, and that (for example) when you call a method on some other object this will refer to that other object ... while executing that method.

This is well understood, and obviously useful ... so there's no need to go into it further.

So what would it mean if this didn't change when you called a method on a different object? Presumably it would refer to the original object.

  • But which original object would it refer to? The value of this in the caller? But where did that come from?
  • And how would such a semantic model of this be useful? I'm struggling to think of any use cases for such a this that couldn't be implement better using static variables.

The other possibility is that you are talking entirely from the perspective of Javascript, where this is indeed rather complicated ... and assuming that this is equally complicated in typical OO languages. Well this is not complicated in the context of Java, C# or C++.

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I'm not saying that this is useless, I'm asking for another keyword which is not same as this. By the way you're playing the devil's advocate 66.6 K :) –  user310291 Apr 10 '11 at 14:07
    
otherwise why would js have created function.bind method to lock the this pointer to a certain value. –  user310291 Apr 10 '11 at 14:09
    
@user310291 - basically because Javascript has a peculiarly complicated model of this ... which is not shared with most other OO languages. –  Stephen C Apr 10 '11 at 15:44
    
ok I'll come back to this thread in a few days when I'll have finished with learning Flash :) –  user310291 Apr 10 '11 at 17:29

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