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I have some DateTime variable, and I want to use System.Threading.Timer to wait until this time arrive. If time is in the past I want the timer to tick immediately.

The problem is TimeSpan.TotalMilliseconds is double and timer due time biggest type islong.

I've tried to max the due-time to long.MaxValue using this code:

DateTime someUtcTime;
// Max due time to long.MaxValue
double doubleDueTime = Math.Min(
    (double)long.MaxValue,
    someUtcTime.Subtract(DateTime.UtcNow).TotalMilliseconds);

// Avoid negative numbers
long dueTime = Math.Max(0L, (long)doubleDueTime);

_timer.Change(dueTime, System.Threading.Timeout.Infinite);

but it turns out that casting long.MaxValue to double and back to long result a negative number (in unchecked code of curse). plz send me teh codez.


Edit: apparently, no matter which of Timer.Change overload you use, they are all limited to 4294967294 (UInt32.MaxValue - 1) milliseconds.


Solution:

cover both extreme cases (someUtcTime = DateTime.MaxValue; UtcNow = DateTime.MinValue; and vice versa).

const uint MAX_SUPPORTED_TIMEOUT = uint.MaxValue - 1; //0xfffffffe

DateTime someUtcTime;
double doubleDueTime = (someUtcTime - DateTime.UtcNow).TotalMilliseconds;

// Avoid negative numbers
doubleDueTime = Math.Max(0d, doubleDueTime);

// Max due time to uint.MaxValue - 1
uint dueTime = (uint)Math.Min(MAX_SUPPORTED_TIMEOUT, doubleDueTime);
share|improve this question
    
What's the purpose of the Math.Min((double)long.MaxValue part of your code? –  Gabe Apr 10 '11 at 13:23
    
"plz send me teh codez." - hopefully that is humour! –  Mitch Wheat Apr 10 '11 at 13:24
    
@Gabe: dates too far in the future? –  Mitch Wheat Apr 10 '11 at 13:24
    
@Gabe: Mitch got it right. –  HuBeZa Apr 10 '11 at 13:26
    
@Mitch, it looked like a simple 2 minutes task, but I can't manage to get it right. Frustration led me to humor. It's a way of saying: "How would you, my fellow scholars, would solve this conundrum?". I hope SO is not banning humor at all :) –  HuBeZa Apr 10 '11 at 13:36

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Since (DateTime.MaxValue - DateTime.MinValue).TotalMilliseconds is 315537897600000 and long.MaxValue is 9223372036854775807 (long can represent a value 4 orders of magnitude larger than the largest possible number of milliseconds between any two DateTime values), you can never have a time too far in the future.

This will suffice:

DateTime someUtcTime;
// Max due time to long.MaxValue
double doubleDueTime = (someUtcTime - DateTime.UtcNow).TotalMilliseconds;

// Avoid negative numbers
long dueTime = Math.Max(0L, (long)doubleDueTime);

_timer.Change(dueTime, System.Threading.Timeout.Infinite);
share|improve this answer
    
Good point mate. Although, as I edited, the limitation is UInt32.MaxValue - 1, so it work for ~50 days in the future. I'll just use this + @Marino's. –  HuBeZa Apr 10 '11 at 14:08

Maybe just work with the Ticks property (Ticks are Long) and multiply by TimeSpan.TicksPerMillisecond (constant, 10,000 ticks per millisecond).

share|improve this answer
    
It sounds like it will work, but somehow it doesn't feel natural for me to use ticks for real world times. Maybe it's just me. –  HuBeZa Apr 10 '11 at 13:29
Timespan timespan = someUtcTime.Subtract(DateTime.UtcNow);
long time = timespan.TotalMilliseconds <= long.MaxValue ? (long)timespan.TotalMilliseconds : -1;

if (time == -1) {
 sorry.nocando();
}
else {
 just.doit();
}

BTW: with a long millisecond you can have a timespan of 292471208 years, I don't think your code will be used by then. There is possibility that the sun will already have expanded past mars and earth is no more :D

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for KISS principle! –  HuBeZa Apr 10 '11 at 14:10
    
beware that I am assuming time on a positive progression, hawking suggests that time could be even immaginary, or going backwards, so '-1' may be a possible time quantity :) –  Marino Šimić Apr 16 '11 at 0:55

Timers are designed to wait for intervals (typically shorter than 24 hours).

What is your intended use? A scheduler would typically have a list of events/tasks, and periodically every minute (maybe every second) check to see if any tasks need to be fired.

Perhaps something like Quartz.Net might be appropriate?

share|improve this answer
    
It is a kind of scheduler, but it is so light on features that I don't want to couple it with 3rd party libraries. –  HuBeZa Apr 10 '11 at 13:25

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