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I'm wondering when programmers use function try blocks. When is it useful?

void f(int i)
try
{
   if ( i  < 0 ) 
      throw "less than zero";
   std::cout << "greater than zero" << std::endl;
}
catch(const char* e)
{
    std::cout << e << std::endl;
}

int main() {
        f(1);
        f(-1);
        return 0;
}

Output: (at ideone)

greater than zero
less than zero

EDIT: As some people might think that the syntax of function defintion is incorrect (because the syntax doesn't look familiar), I've to say that no its not incorrect. Its called function-try-block. See §8.4/1 [dcl.fct.def] in the C++ Standard.

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Related: stackoverflow.com/questions/3889811/… –  Alexandre C. Apr 10 '11 at 14:50
1  
I've seen it abused to implement void f() synchronized { } in C++. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Apr 10 '11 at 15:24
    
@Johannes: Where does this synchronized come from? How can anyone abuse it using synchronized whatever it means in C++? –  Nawaz Apr 10 '11 at 15:30
    
@Nawaz no, they implemented that. It's a macro that makes the function behave like Java's synchronized functions. And they abused function try blocks for this. AFAIR, it was shown off by Alexandrescu :) –  Johannes Schaub - litb Apr 10 '11 at 15:33
1  
@Johannes: put this as an answer so that we can upvote it. –  Alexandre C. Apr 10 '11 at 17:44

5 Answers 5

up vote 10 down vote accepted

You use it in constructors to catch errors from initializers. Usually, you don't catch those errors, so this is a quite exceptional use.

Otherwise, it is useless: unless I'm proven wrong,

void f() try { ... } catch (...) { ... }

is strictly equivalent to

void f() { try { ... } catch (...) { ... } }
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1  
ctor-initializer. Initialization lists are something else. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Apr 10 '11 at 14:49
4  
@Tomalak: good catch (no pun intended) –  Alexandre C. Apr 10 '11 at 14:50
    
Thanks –  Lightness Races in Orbit Apr 10 '11 at 14:51
2  
WARNING: in constructors and destructors, the exception is still rethrown _implicitly_ after catch ends, so they are still nearly useless - see e.g.: informit.com/guides/content.aspx?g=cplusplus&seqNum=496 –  akavel Nov 15 '11 at 10:33
4  
@akavel: they are not useless. You may want to perform some cleanup or logging before having the exception rethrown. Or you may want to throw another exception (which is allowed). Actually, the behavior is understandable: if a subobject or a base failed to get constructed, then the object cannot be constructed successfully and has to throw. –  Alexandre C. Nov 15 '11 at 15:58

Function try block are useful for me in two contexts.

a) To have a catch all clause around main() allowing to write small utilities without having to worry about local error handling:

int main()
try {
    // ...
    return 0;
}
catch (...) {
    // handle errors
    return -1;
}

which is clearly just syntactic sugar for having a try/catch inside main() itself.

b) to handle exceptions thrown by base class constructors:

struct B {
     B() { /*might throw*/ }
};

struct A : B {
     A() 
     try : B() { 
         // ... 
     } 
     catch (...) {
         // handle exceptions thrown from inside A() or by B() 
     } 
};
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4  
(a) Sugar is usually sweet. I dispute that that is "sweet". (b) Base class construction failure should usually result in derived class construction failure, and if your uncaught exception does not signify an exceptional case preventing base class construction, then you're abusing exceptions; this is a code smell IMO. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Apr 10 '11 at 14:52
    
Tomalek, I believe you're just to quick with your assessment. It's not always possible to handle the exceptions locally in the base class or member constructor, as you might not have control over that source code. And sometimes you can and have to continue executing even if the base class throws (for instance, a database connect or a file open, which may fail), but still finish constructing the derived class, leaving it in a valid state. –  hkaiser Apr 10 '11 at 14:57
2  
@hkaiser: If your base object throws but you can still have a derived object in "a valid state", I believe that you are using inheritance inappropriately. If the base object is not in a valid state, then the derived object can not be in a valid state. (Note, objects not classes.) –  Lightness Races in Orbit Apr 10 '11 at 14:59
3  
Sometimes you don't care what a constructor throws; you just want any exception caught and then a known exception thrown, because upstream there's a handler that needs to distinguish "my constructor threw for some reason" from "some other code of mine threw", preventing it from using the catch-all. –  Mike DeSimone Apr 10 '11 at 15:03
5  
@Tomalak: The catch block of the constructor always throws or rethrows. There is an implicit throw; added at the end of it. So, even as @hkaiser has written this, it does not imply the object is left valid. –  Potatoswatter Apr 10 '11 at 15:05

It might be useful if you want to catch exceptions from constructor's initializer.

However, if you do catch exception in constructor that way, you have to either rethrow it or throw new exception (i.e. you cannot just normally return from constructor). If you do not rethrow, it just happens implicitly.

#include <iostream>

class A
{
public:
  A()
  try {
    throw 5;
  }
  catch (int) {
    std::cout << "exception thrown\n";
    //return; <- invalid
  }
};

int main()
{
  try {
    A a;
  }
  catch (...) {
    std::cout << "was rethrown";
  }
}
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ctor-initializer. Initializer lists are something else. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Apr 10 '11 at 15:00
    
Already fixed that, thanks! –  Vitus Apr 10 '11 at 15:00
    
No problem –  Lightness Races in Orbit Apr 10 '11 at 15:03

No, I haven't. In that trivial case it's not useful. However, it's useful to encapsulate ctor-initialisers in try/catch (if your design is ever sufficiently broken to require it).

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Aside from the functional uses mentioned, you can use the function-try-block to save yourself one level of indentation. (Ack, an answer about coding styles!)

Typically you see examples with the function-try-block like so:

void f(/*...*/)
try {
   /*...*/
}
catch(/*...*/) {
    /*...*/
}

Where the function scope is indented to the same level as if there were no function-try-block. This can be useful when:

  • you have an 80 character column limit and would have to wrap lines given the extra indentation.
  • you are trying to retrofit some existing function with try catch and don't want to touch all the lines of the function. (Yeah, we could just use git blame -w.)

Though, for functions that are entirely wrapped with a function-try-block, I would suggest not alternating between some functions using function-try-blocks and some not within the same code base. Consistency is probably more important then line wrapping issues. :)

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