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Please help;

Header File

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>


@interface MyClass : NSObject {

    NSMutableString * myString;

}

@property (nonatomic, retain) NSMutableString * myString;

-(id) init;
-(void) dealloc;

@end

Implementation File

#import "MyClass.h"


@implementation MyClass

@synthesize myString;

-(id) init {

    if ((self = [super init])) {
        self.myString = [[NSMutableString alloc] init];
    }

    return self;
}

-(void) dealloc {
    [super dealloc];
    [self.myString release];
}

@end

Usage

MyClass * m = [[MyClass alloc] init];
[m release];
//-- Xcode 4 profiler reports a memory leak here.

However, when the code in implementation file of the class is changed to not use the [self.myString .....] notation, then no memory leak is reported.

So,

    -(id) init {

           if ((self = [super init])) {
                myString = [[NSMutableString alloc] init];
            }

            return self;
        }
}

and

 -(void) dealloc {
        [super dealloc];
        [myString release];
    }

works fine. No memory leaks reported.

Any ideas - is it profiler or is it me (be nice)?

share|improve this question
3  
Don't call [super dealloc] first, it will free your instances memory and thus when you access an ivar later, you access already freed memory. Oh and about your questions, its you :) –  JustSid Apr 10 '11 at 15:38
    
And do [myString release], not [self.myString release]. Otherwise, if you change the memory management semantic of the myString property to copy (which is technically what it should be) at some point, you'll end up leaking the string. –  jlehr Apr 10 '11 at 15:47
    
@jlehr - No he wouldn't. Copy only creates a copy when the property is set, not when it's read, meaning [self.myString release] would work correctly. –  Sherm Pendley Apr 12 '11 at 11:45

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your memory leak is not caused by using your setter. Your memory leak is caused by you not managing your memory correctly!

If you declare the following property

@property (nonatomic, retain) id value;

That means that the compiler generates methods that look something like this (highly simplified):

- (id)value {
  return value;
}

- (void)setValue:(id)aValue {
  [value autorelease];
  value = [aValue retain];
}

When you use dot-notation, self.value = obj is desugared into [self setValue:obj]. Thence, you are actually causing obj to be retained within the setter. If you initially create an owning reference to obj (by using an +alloc without a corresponding -release or -autorelease), you'll have over-retained obj, and it will never be deallocated. Hence, you need to do something like this:

id obj = [[[NSObject alloc] init] autorelease];
self.value = obj;

or

id obj = [[NSObject alloc] init];
self.value = [obj autorelease];

or

id obj = [[NSObject alloc] init];
self.value = obj;
[obj release];

Whatever you do, you need to make sure that when you assert ownership of an object (by retaining it), you also release it.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for visually providing alternate solutions. It helps me understand what I'm doing wrong and gives me some direction. –  nspire Apr 10 '11 at 16:09
    
No problem, bro! –  Jonathan Sterling Apr 10 '11 at 16:18

Setter methods in Objective-C equate to a reatain of the new object and release of the old object. In your case the compiler will generate a setter method for your myString property that looks something like...

- (void)setMyString:(NSMutableString*)aString {
    [myString autorelease];
    myString = [aString retain];
}

When you invoke self.myString = in your init method this translates to a call to the setter. The setter in turn retains the object you pass to it. Because you've directly alloc'd the NSString it begins life with a retain count of one, you then call the setter and the retain count becomes two.

There's two approaches to fixing the problem, the first would be to add a call to [myString autorelease] after you alloc it. Or secondly switch your init method to directly assign the ivar...

// in your init method...
myString = [[NSMutableString alloc] init];

It's a good idea to avoid setter usage in init methods, not because of retain counts but because the object as a whole is not yet fully initialized.

share|improve this answer

@property (nonatomic, RETAIN)

you are retaining my friend. You have to release the object twice then because the retain count is 2

here is what you should do in the INIT method:

NSString *str = [[NSString alloc] initWithString:@"Hello World!"];
self.myString = str;
[str release]; // dont leak

Also I do not recommend using self.someProperty in the class itself. Doing so requires 1 extra objc_msgSend() to be done to access your variable and will slow down your application.

share|improve this answer
2  
@Antawn Oof, the advice against using accessor methods seems really questionable to me. Do you really think one additional message is going to create measurable overhead in an iOS app? To me, that's a fairly extreme example of premature optimization. On the other hand, getters and setters often have side effects, e.g. lazy initialization, KVO, etc., so avoiding using them means potentially sprinkling knowledge of their implementation all over your app. Not a good idea at all, IMO. –  jlehr Apr 10 '11 at 15:37
2  
-1 for suggesting the objc_msgSend has overhead, but +1 for correctly identifying the issue. Also: [self setMyString:[NSMutableString string]]; –  Dave DeLong Apr 10 '11 at 15:37
1  
@jlehr of course, but were only talking about a dozen or so instructions. That's like... what... 12 nanoseconds per message? It's so insignificant it's almost not worth measuring. But I agree: it's only a problem if Instruments says its a problem. –  Dave DeLong Apr 10 '11 at 15:48
1  
@Antwan except that you're retaining it via the property, so it would be sticking around anyway, regardless of whether you alloc/inited it or +string'd it. And where do you get that autorelease adds overhead and that it's "advised against by apple"? Prove it to me; show me empirical evidence gathered with Instruments and a link to the documentation where it says I shouldn't use autorelease. –  Dave DeLong Apr 11 '11 at 17:00
1  
@Antwan so the difference is ~0.2 seconds for 5 million NSString objects! (Assuming a 1GHz processor) This means that each autorelease is taking an extra 40 nanoseconds. OH THE OVERHEAD. This is a case of premature optimization. Fix the big problems, and then worry about autorelease once you've measured and proven it to be a bottleneck. Otherwise you're just wasting your time "fixing" something that isn't a problem. –  Dave DeLong Apr 11 '11 at 17:44

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