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I apologize in advance for the long code, but it might be relevant. It's also easier that making new code to demonstrate. I can DROP the table using phpMyAdmin, run this script, then go back to phpMyAdmin and see that it created the table. However, the table is empty, and this script should populate with a test row.

import MySQLdb  
def makeTable():  
    dbInfo = { 'username':'livetaor_atowrw', 'password':'~HIDDEN~', \  
    'server':'~HIDDEN~.com', 'base':'livetaor_towing', \  
    'table':'inventory' }  
    try:  
        sql = MySQLdb.connect(user=dbInfo['username'], \  
        passwd=dbInfo['password'], \  
        host=dbInfo['server'], db=dbInfo['base'])  
        cursor = sql.cursor ()  
        cursor.execute ("SELECT VERSION()")  
        cursor.execute ("""   
            CREATE TABLE inventory (   
            id INT NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT PRIMARY KEY,   
            itemNumber VARCHAR(24),   
            itemDescription VARCHAR(255),   
            itemCategory VARCHAR(24),   
            itemVendor VARCHAR(48),   
            itemVendorItemNumber VARCHAR(24),   
            itemCost FLOAT,   
            itemMarkup FLOAT,   
            item4Customers BOOL,   
            itemOnReplenishment BOOL,   
            itemReplenishAlert INT,   
            itemBolivarQuantity INT,   
            itemLamarQuantity INT,   
            itemSpringfieldQuantity INT )   
        """)  
        cursor.execute ("""   
            INSERT INTO inventory (   
            itemNumber,   
            itemDescription,   
            itemCategory,   
            itemVendor,   
            itemVendorItemNumber,   
            itemCost,   
            itemMarkup,   
            item4Customers,   
            itemOnReplenishment,   
            itemReplenishAlert,   
            itemBolivarQuantity,   
            itemLamarQuantity,   
            itemSpringfieldQuantity,   
            ) VALUES (   
            'TestItemNumber001',   
            'fictitious item description',   
            'TestCategory',   
            'Scripted Vendor',   
            'ITEM:maketable.py',   
            '1.00',   
            '1.33',   
            '1',   
            '1',  
            '6',    
            '65613',   
            '64759',   
            '65802'   
            )   
        """)  
        cursor.commit()  
        cursor.close()  
        sql.close()  
    except MySQLdb.Error, e:  
        error =  "Error %d: %s" % (e.args[0], e.args[1])  
confirm = None  
confirm = raw_input('Do you know what you are doing? ')  
if confirm == 'YeS':  
    makeTable()  
else:  
    print "Didn't think so. Now, it's probably best to forget about this file."  
share|improve this question
    
Why all the dots? –  Lasse V. Karlsen Apr 10 '11 at 19:31
3  
What do you do with the "error" variable? If you're swallowing up exceptions, stop doing that first, then it should be easy figuring out why this fails. –  Lasse V. Karlsen Apr 10 '11 at 19:36
    
@Lasse that should be an answer here... –  AJ. Apr 10 '11 at 20:07
    
@AJ Reposted as answer. –  Lasse V. Karlsen Apr 10 '11 at 20:18
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3 Answers

There are a few guesses as to what the problem with your code is, but I'm going to tackle your implicit, but unsaid, question instead.

That question reads as follows:

My program runs, does not crash, and yet my table is empty. Why is that?

That is a slightly different question, and the reason it doesn't crash is because you explicitly told it not to:

See this code?

except MySQLdb.Error, e:
    error = "Error %d: %s" % (e.args[0], e.args[1])

This catches your exception, and places the exception message and other bits into an error variable.

However, unless you inspect that variable, and act upon its contents, you're effectively swallowing the exception.

Remove that bit and re-execute your program, and you'll find the real reason your program fail.

Personally I would guess it is the extra comma in your SQL, after listing up all the column names, here:

itemLamarQuantity,
itemSpringfieldQuantity,        <-- here
) VALUES (
'TestItemNumber001',
'fictitious item description',
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Should it not be not commit on the cursor?

cursor.close()
sql.commit()  
sql.close()  
share|improve this answer
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Unless Im losing my marbles.

Your insert shows 13 columns and 12 values.

share|improve this answer
    
PS I think its the Item4Customers missing. –  BugFinder Apr 10 '11 at 19:34
    
no, you're not loosing it! I had to look a couple times now that you mentioned it. It's itemReplenishAlert that's missing. I corrected it in the source above, however it still doesn't werk. –  brad Apr 10 '11 at 19:58
    
Do you get an exception? –  Lasse V. Karlsen Apr 10 '11 at 20:00
    
You also have a comma after the last column name in your columns section. –  BugFinder Apr 10 '11 at 20:09
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