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I've been working on a bitmap decoder, but my algorithm for processing the pixel data doesn't seem to be quite right:

    public IntPtr ReadPixels(Stream fs, int offset, int width, int height, int bpp)
    {
        IntPtr bBits;

        int pixelCount = bpp * width * height;
        int Row = 0;
        decimal value = ((bpp*width)/32)/4;
        int RowSize = (int)Math.Ceiling(value);
        int ArraySize = RowSize * Math.Abs(height);
        int Col = 0;
        Byte[] BMPData = new Byte[ArraySize];

        BinaryReader r = new BinaryReader(fs);
        r.BaseStream.Seek(offset, SeekOrigin.Begin);

        while (Row < height)
        {
            Byte ReadByte;

            if (!(Col >= RowSize))
            {                       
                ReadByte = r.ReadByte();
                BMPData[(Row * RowSize) + Col] = ReadByte;
                Col += 1;                    
            }

            if (Col >= RowSize)
            {
                Col = 0;
                Row += 1;
            }
        }

        bBits = System.Runtime.InteropServices.Marshal.AllocHGlobal(BMPData.Length);
        System.Runtime.InteropServices.Marshal.Copy(BMPData, 0, bBits, BMPData.Length);

        return bBits;
}

I can process only monochrome bitmaps and on some, parts of the bitmap is processed fine. None are compressed and they are rendered upside down and flipped around. I really could do with some help on this one.

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@user646265: why do you use this decimal value = ((bpp*width)/32)/4 ? What is this for? I mean /32 and /4... –  Marco Apr 10 '11 at 20:22
1  
32 and 4 are a private case for images with float sub-pixels and 4 channels. Won't work for any other image data format. –  Danny Varod Apr 10 '11 at 20:55
    
@Marco: see en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BMP_file_format#Pixel_Storage. –  user646265 Apr 10 '11 at 21:32
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted
    decimal value = ((bpp*width)/32)/4;
    int RowSize = (int)Math.Ceiling(value);

That isn't correct. Your RowSize variable is actually called "stride". You compute it like this:

    int bytes = (width * bitsPerPixel + 7) / 8;
    int stride = 4 * ((bytes + 3) / 4);
share|improve this answer
    
Will only work for one pixel format, highly unrecommened to use this method. –  Danny Varod Apr 14 '11 at 9:18
    
Erm, no, bitsPerPixel is not a constant. –  Hans Passant Apr 14 '11 at 9:50
    
However, 4 is... –  Danny Varod Apr 14 '11 at 17:42
    
And using decimal for floating point numbers, really inefficient. –  Danny Varod Apr 14 '11 at 17:44
    
Hmya, that's because stride actually is a multiple of 4. And there's no floating point in my snippet, this is integer math. –  Hans Passant Apr 15 '11 at 11:55
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You are ignoring the stride.

Image rows can be padded to the left with additional Bytes to make their size divide by a number such as (1 = no padding, 2, 4, 8 = default for many images, 16, ...).

Also, images can be a rectangle region within a larger image, making the "padding" between lines in the smaller image even larger (since the stride is the larger image's stride). - In this case the image can also have an offset for its start point within the buffer.

Better practice is:

// Overload this method 3 time for different bit per SUB-pixel values (8, 16, or 32)
// = (byte, int, float)
// SUB-pixel != pixel (= 1 3 or 4 sub-pixels (grey or RGB or BGR or BGRA or RGBA or ARGB or ABGR)
unsafe
{
    byte[] buffer = image.Buffer;
    int stride = image.buffer.Length / image.PixelHeight;
    // or int stride = image.LineSize; (or something like that)

    fixed (float* regionStart = (float*)(void*)buffer) // or byte* or int* depending on datatype
    {
        for (int y = 0; y < height; y++) // height in pixels
        {
            // float* and float or byte* and byte or int* and int
            float* currentPos
                = regionStart + offset / SizeOf(float) + stride / SizeOf(float) * y;

            for (int x = 0; x < width; x++) // width in pixels
            {
                for (int chan = 0; chan < channel; chan++) // 1, 3 or 4 channels
                {
                    // DO NOT USE DECIMAL - you want accurate image values
                    // with best performance - primative types
                    // not a .NET complex type used for nice looking values for users e.g. 12.34
                    // instead use actual sub pixel type (float/int/byte) or double instead!
                    var currentValue = value;

                    currentPos++;
                }
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Assumptions - offset and stride are in Bytes, not in actual data type - hence the division by SizeOf(x). Actual property names of BitmapSource and xxxDecoder may differ (can't remember them of by heart). –  Danny Varod Apr 10 '11 at 21:03
    
@Danny Varod: I don't fully understand: is channel the bits per pixel and how do I access the pointer in the Bitmap construct? P.S. What are image.buffer and image.pixel height? Thanks for the example, though. –  user646265 Apr 10 '11 at 21:39
    
Sub-pixel size * number of channels = bits per pixel. Read the pixel format (e.g. RGBA32 or RGB24) an decode to number of channels + sub pixel format using enum. (E.g. RGBA = 4 channels 32/4 = 8 bit per sub pixel = byte format.) –  Danny Varod Apr 11 '11 at 7:39
    
Pixel height is height in pixels (not display height). Buffer is what you get when you read out the image pixels (pixel memory buffer), e.g. image.readpixels or stream. –  Danny Varod Apr 12 '11 at 0:00
    
Thanks, this code is great, but also confusing. I have managed to apply the stride and render the bitmaps fine without it, thanks anyway. –  user646265 Apr 14 '11 at 8:54
show 1 more comment

I find something I don't understand:

decimal value = ((bpp*width)/32)/4;
int RowSize = (int)Math.Ceiling(value);

RowSize, in my opinion, should be (bpp*width) / 8 + (bpp%8==0?0:1)

share|improve this answer
    
Line size can be bigger due to various paddings, for instance. (See my answer.) –  Danny Varod Apr 10 '11 at 20:54
    
@Danny Varod: I'm learning something new, thanks!! –  Marco Apr 10 '11 at 20:57
    
Np, don't forget to vote :-) –  Danny Varod Apr 10 '11 at 21:01
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