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This Java code:

public class XYZ {   
    public static void main(){  
        int toyNumber = 5;   
        XYZ temp = new XYZ();  
        temp.play(toyNumber);  
        System.out.println("Toy number in main " + toyNumber);  
    }

    void play(int toyNumber){  
        System.out.println("Toy number in play " + toyNumber);   
        toyNumber++;  
        System.out.println("Toy number in play after increement " + toyNumber);   
    }   
}  

will output this:

 
Toy number in play 5  
Toy number in play after increement 6  
Toy number in main 5  

In C++ I can pass the toyNumber variable as pass by reference to avoid shadowing i.e. creating a copy of the same variable as below:

void main(){  
    int toyNumber = 5;  
    play(toyNumber);  
    cout << "Toy number in main " << toyNumber << endl;  
}

void play(int &toyNumber){  
    cout << "Toy number in play " << toyNumber << endl;   
    toyNumber++;  
    cout << "Toy number in play after increement " << toyNumber << endl;   
} 

and the C++ output will be this:

Toy number in play 5  
Toy number in play after increement 6  
Toy number in main 6  

My question is - What's the equivalent code in Java to get the same output as the C++ code, given that Java is pass by value rather than pass by reference?

share|improve this question
15  
This doesn't seem like a duplicate to me - the supposedly duplicate question deals with how java works and what the terms mean, which is education, while this question asks specifically how to get something resembling pass-by-reference behaviour, something many C/C++/D/Ada programmers might be wondering in order to get practical work done, not caring why java is all pass-by-value. –  DarenW Oct 18 '11 at 18:58
1  
@DarenW I fully agree - have voted to reopen. Oh, and you have enough reputation to do the same :-) –  Duncan Nov 1 '13 at 15:48

6 Answers 6

up vote 86 down vote accepted

You have several choices. The one that makes the most sense really depends on what you're trying to do.

Choice 1: make toyNumber a public member variable in a class

class MyToy {
  public int toyNumber;
}

then pass a reference to a MyToy to your method.

void play(MyToy toy){  
    System.out.println("Toy number in play " + toy.toyNumber);   
    toy.toyNumber++;  
    System.out.println("Toy number in play after increement " + toy.toyNumber);   
}

Choice 2: return the value instead of pass by reference

int play(int toyNumber){  
    System.out.println("Toy number in play " + toyNumber);   
    toyNumber++;  
    System.out.println("Toy number in play after increement " + toyNumber);   
    return toyNumber
}

This choice would require a small change to the callsite in main so that it reads, toyNumber = temp.play(toyNumber);.

Choice 3: make it a class or static variable

If the two functions are methods on the same class or class instance, you could convert toyNumber into a class member variable.

Choice 4: Create a single element array of type int and pass that

This is considered a hack, but is sometimes employed to return values from inline class invocations.

void play(int [] toyNumber){  
    System.out.println("Toy number in play " + toyNumber[0]);   
    toyNumber[0]++;  
    System.out.println("Toy number in play after increement " + toyNumber[0]);   
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Clear explanation and especially good for providing multiple choices on how to code for the desired effect. Directly helpful for something I'm working on right now! It is nuts that this question was closed. –  DarenW Oct 18 '11 at 19:08
    
Although your choice 1 does do what you are trying to convey, I actually had to go back and double check it. The question asks if you can pass by reference; so really you should have done the printlns in the same scope that the toy passed to the function exists in. The way you have it, the printlns are operated in the same scope as the increment which doesn't really prove the point, of COURSE a local copy printed after an increment will have a different value, however that doesn't mean that the passed reference will. Again though, your example does work, but doesn't prove the point. –  zero298 Aug 27 '13 at 19:26
    
No, I think it's correct the way it is. Each function "play()" in my answer above is intended as a drop-in replacement for the original "play()" function, which also printed the value before and after incrementing. The original question has the println() in main that proves pass by reference. –  laslowh Sep 9 '13 at 12:58
    
Choice 2 requires further explanation: the call site in main must be changed to toyNumber = temp.play(toyNumber); for it to work as desired. –  ToolmakerSteve Jul 23 at 3:31

Java is not call by reference it is call by value only

But an object's value is also its reference

So if you use a Mutable Object you will see the behavior you want

public class XYZ {

    public static void main(String[] arg) {
        StringBuilder toyNumber = new StringBuilder("5");
        play(toyNumber);
        System.out.println("Toy number in main " + toyNumber);
    }

    private static void play(StringBuilder toyNumber) {
        System.out.println("Toy number in play " + toyNumber);
        toyNumber.append(" + 1");
        System.out.println("Toy number in play after increement " + toyNumber);
    }
}

Output of this code:

run:
Toy number in play 5
Toy number in play after increement 5 + 1
Toy number in main 5 + 1
BUILD SUCCESSFUL (total time: 0 seconds)

You can see this behavior in Standard libraries too. For example Collections.sort(); Collections.shuffle(); This methods does not return a new list but modifies it's argument object.

    List<Integer> mutableList = new ArrayList<Integer>();

    mutableList.add(1);
    mutableList.add(2);
    mutableList.add(3);
    mutableList.add(4);
    mutableList.add(5);

    System.out.println(mutableList);

    Collections.shuffle(mutableList);

    System.out.println(mutableList);

    Collections.sort(mutableList);

    System.out.println(mutableList);

Output of this code:

run:
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
[3, 4, 1, 5, 2]
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
BUILD SUCCESSFUL (total time: 0 seconds)
share|improve this answer
    
This is not an answer to the question. It would have answered the question, if it suggested making an integer array that contained a single element, and then modifying that element within method play; e.g. mutableList[0] = mutableList[0] + 1;. As Ernest Friedman-Hill suggests. –  ToolmakerSteve Jul 23 at 3:39

Make a

class PassMeByRef { public int theValue; }

then pass a reference to an instance of it. Note that a method that mutates state through its arguments is best avoided, especially in parallel code.

share|improve this answer
1  
Downvoted by me. This is wrong on so many levels. Java is pass by value - always. No exceptions. –  duffymo Apr 10 '11 at 23:58
6  
@duffymo - Of course you can downvote as you please - but have you considered what the OP asked? He wants to pass and int by reference - and just this is accomplished if I pass by value a reference to an instance of the above. –  Ingo Apr 11 '11 at 7:55
    
@duffymo: Huh? You are mistaken, or else misunderstand the question. This IS one of the traditional ways in Java of doing what the OP requests. –  ToolmakerSteve Jul 23 at 3:42

You cannot pass primitives by reference in Java. All variables of object type are actually pointers, of course, but we call them "references", and they are also always passed by value.

In a situation where you really need to pass a primitive by value, what people will do sometimes is declare the parameter as an array of primitive type, and then pass a single-element array as the argument. So you pass a reference int[1], and in the method, you can change the contents of the array.

share|improve this answer
    
Can this be done using the Wrapper class available in JAVA ? –  Prat Apr 10 '11 at 20:48
1  
No -- all the wrapper classes are immutable -- they represent a fixed value that can't be changed once the object is created. –  Ernest Friedman-Hill Apr 10 '11 at 21:28
1  
"You cannot pass primitives by reference in Java": the OP seems to understand this, as they are contrasting C++ (where you can) with Java. –  Raedwald Apr 30 at 12:19
public static void main(String[] args) {
    int[] toyNumber = new int[] {5};
    NewClass temp = new NewClass();
    temp.play(toyNumber);
    System.out.println("Toy number in main " + toyNumber[0]);
}

void play(int[] toyNumber){
    System.out.println("Toy number in play " + toyNumber[0]);
    toyNumber[0]++;
    System.out.println("Toy number in play after increement " + toyNumber[0]);
}
share|improve this answer

For a quick solution, you can use AtomicInteger or any of the atomic variables which will let you change the value inside the method using the inbuilt methods. Here is sample code:

import java.util.concurrent.atomic.AtomicInteger;


public class PrimitivePassByReferenceSample {

    /**
     * @param args
     */
    public static void main(String[] args) {

        AtomicInteger myNumber = new AtomicInteger(0);
        System.out.println("MyNumber before method Call:" + myNumber.get());
        PrimitivePassByReferenceSample temp = new PrimitivePassByReferenceSample() ;
        temp.changeMyNumber(myNumber);
        System.out.println("MyNumber After method Call:" + myNumber.get());


    }

     void changeMyNumber(AtomicInteger myNumber) {
        myNumber.getAndSet(100);

    }

}

Output:

MyNumber before method Call:0

MyNumber After method Call:100
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