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I hope to phrase my question correctly (if not please help me to entitle it better) ,to make it clear,please take a look at my code.


class Factory
{
    public string Name { get; set; }

    private Person _manager;
    public Person Manager 
    {
        get
        {
            return (_manager );
        }
        set
        {
            _manager = value;
            if (_manager.WorkPlace!=this)
            {
                _manager.WorkPlace = this;
            }
        }
    }

    public Factory(string name, Person manager)
    {
        Name = name;
        Manager = manager;
        if (Manager.WorkPlace ==null)
        {
            Manager.WorkPlace = this;
        }

    }

    public Factory(string name, string managerFullName, int managerAge)
    {
        Name = name;
        Manager = new Person(managerFullName, managerAge);

        if (Manager.WorkPlace != this)
        {
            Manager.WorkPlace = this;
        }

    }

    public void ShowInfo()
    {...}

}

my problem appears when using first constructor of factory class

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Person oPerson1=new Person("Jon",30);

        factory oFactory1=new Factory("f1",oPerson1);
        factory oFactory2=new Factory("f2",oPerson1);
        factory oFactory3=new Factory("f3",oPerson1);
        factory oFactory4=new Factory("f4",oPerson1);
        ...
    }
}

as you can see in this constructor I can use one person object(as a manger) more than one time ,in fact so many times it could be used , and there is nothing to prevent me . that means one person could manage many factories,I dont want it.I want a person could mange only one factory,how is that possible?


to handle this issue some workarounds came to my mind.
1- deleting that constructor and using only another one .(but I am looking for a better solution,I would like to have that constructor.)
2- throwing an exception in Run time that i hate it


as i know the c# compiler has nothing to prevent passing an object more than one time.
should I change something in design of the class? what is your recommendation? what is the best solution ?thank u so much for any advices.

EDIT:Our business Logic

each factory has a manager ,its meaningless to have a factory without a manger.

and a person could be a manager.

person(1..1)-------------(0..1)factory

share|improve this question
2  
How big a problem is this? Can't you simply ... not do it? –  Lasse V. Karlsen Apr 10 '11 at 20:47
    
Throwing an exception in the constructor is your closest bet –  BrokenGlass Apr 10 '11 at 20:52

4 Answers 4

Relationships are better modeled with static code relationships than with imperative checks. That would enable the compiler to help you enforce the relationship.

Remove the manager from the factory and add the factory to the manager:

public class Manager : Person
{
    public Manager(Factory factory)
}

In this way a Manager can manage only one Factory...

share|improve this answer

The answer is in your code:

set
{
    _manager = value;
    if (_manager.WorkPlace!=this)
    {
        _manager.WorkPlace = this;
    }
}

Replace this with

set
{
    if (value == null)  // Edit: Add manager release capability to change factories
    {
        if(_manager != null)
           _manager.WorkPlace = null;

        _manager = null;
    }
    else if (value.WorkPlace == null)
    {
        _manager = value;
        _manager.WorkPlace = this;
    }
    else
        throw new ArgumentException();
}
share|improve this answer
1  
this would mean managers can't switch jobs though ;-) –  BrokenGlass Apr 10 '11 at 20:56
    
1-we must assign a value to _manager at the first line of the set,if not an "object Null refrence exception " would be raised. 2-imagin you use this class,what s your feeling when u see an exception Frequently. 3-as Broken said,in this manner we would have problem when changing a Factory Manager or vice versa .thanks –  siamak Apr 10 '11 at 22:32
    
1 - Thanks, fixed. 2 - Since this is a restriction of the problem, it's an error to assign the manager to another factory. But it should be in the documentation. Or might use Code Contracts to have it also in intellisense. 3 - Change might be done by first releasing the current one. It might be a good idea to have that situation. (I'll add it to the code). –  sukru Apr 10 '11 at 22:48

I use the following "micropattern" for setters:

    public Person Manager 
    {
        get
        {
            return (_manager );
        }
        set
        {
            if (_manager != null)
            {
                _manager.WorkPlace = null;
            }

            _manager = value;

            if (_manager != null)
            {
                _manager.WorkPlace = this;
            }
        }

Now, whenever you associate a manager with a factory, it's old manager is automatically de-associated with the factory.

Now, this does not prevent you reassigning a manager to a factory. But it will make sure that pointers are always in sync with each other.

I learned this trick from Martin Fowlers Refactoring. An online reference to the technique can be found here.

share|improve this answer
    
I think you mean _manager.WorkPlace.Manager = null; –  Mark Cidade Apr 10 '11 at 21:08
    
very good refrence ,thank u –  siamak Apr 10 '11 at 22:15

Despite that you hate it, throwing an exception in the constructor will notify you early that you have an error. You also need to make sure that the Person isn't already a manager.

public Factory(string name, Person manager)
{   if (Manager.WorkPlace != null && Manager.WorkPlace.Manager==manager)
    { 
        var errmsg = "Cannot pass an existing manager to Factory constructor.";
        throw new ArgumentException("manager",errmsg);
    }

    Name = name;
    Manager = manager;
    Manager.WorkPlace = this;
}
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