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Efficient way to test string for certain words

I want to check if a string contains any of these words: ban, bad, user, pass, stack, name, html.

If it contains any of the words I need to echo the number of bad words

str = 'Hello my name is user';
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marked as duplicate by ЯegDwight, hakre, Gordon, PeeHaa, DaveRandom Sep 27 '12 at 15:24

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

4  
what have you tried so far? –  Stedy Apr 10 '11 at 22:28
1  
For what do you need this? "ban" and such are usually no "bad words". –  KingCrunch Apr 10 '11 at 22:33
4  
Watch out, you're headed for a clbuttic mistake. –  Charles Apr 10 '11 at 22:55
1  
As you go forward with this, please only filter upon display. Leave the data in your DB clean, unless for performance reasons you need to filter ahead of time. That way if you do make a "clbuttic error", it is no big deal. Plus, the "adults" on your board could eventually have a setting to see everything. –  Brad Apr 11 '11 at 1:09

5 Answers 5

up vote 13 down vote accepted

I think something like this would work:

$badWords = array("ban","bad","user","pass","stack","name","html");

$string = "Hello my name is user.";

$matches = array();
$matchFound = preg_match_all(
                "/\b(" . implode($badWords,"|") . ")\b/i", 
                $string, 
                $matches
              );

if ($matchFound) {
  $words = array_unique($matches[0]);
  foreach($words as $word) {
    echo "<li>" . $word . "</li>";
  }
  echo "</ul>";
}

This creates an array of banned words, and uses a regular expression to find instances of these words:

  • \b in the Regex indicates a word boundary (i.e. the beginning or end of a word, determined by either the beginning/end of the string or a non-word character). This is done to prevent "clbuttic" mistakes - i.e. you don't want to ban the word "banner" when you only want to match the word "ban".

  • The implode function creates a single string containing all your banned words, separated by a pipe character, which is the or operator in the Regex.

  • The implode portion of the Regex is surrounded with parentheses so that preg_match_all will capture the banned word as the match.

  • The i modifier at the end of the Regex indicates that the match should be case-sensitive - i.e. it will match each word regardless of capitalization - "Ban, "ban", and "BAN" will all match against the word "ban" in the $badWords array.

Next, the code checks if any matches were found. If there are, it uses array_unique to ensure only one instance of each word is reported, and then it outputs the list of matches in an unordered list.

Is this what you're looking for?

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1  
This is great when you don't have many 'bad words'. I have 3000 words, and the regular expression doesn't work because it is too large. –  Chris Harrison Mar 26 '12 at 9:10

This is what you want.

function teststringforbadwords($string,$banned_words) {
    foreach($banned_words as $banned_word) {
        if(stristr($string,$banned_word)){
            return false;
        }
    }
    return true;
}

$string = "test string";
$banned_words = array('ban','bad','user','pass','stack','name','html');

if (!teststringforbadwords($string,$banned_words)) {
    echo 'string is clean';
}else{
    echo 'string contains banned words';
}
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2  
A couple issues here - 1) this is vulnerable to "clbuttic" issues where you'll accidentally ban the words "banner" and "namesake" when trying to look for "ban" and "name", and 2) stristr returns the position index of the match, but because it is zero-based, a match at the very beginning of the string looks the same as "false". You need to update the code to explicitly check that stristr returns false not just 0 - i.e. if(stristr($string,$banned_word) === FALSE)) –  AgentConundrum Apr 10 '11 at 23:06
  • The \b in the pattern indicates a word boundary, so only the distinct word "web" is matched, and not a word partial like "webbing" or "cobweb"

    if (preg_match("/\bweb\b/i", "PHP is the web scripting language of choice.")) { echo "A match was found."; } else { echo "A match was not found."; }

    if (preg_match("/\bweb\b/i", "PHP is the website scripting language of choice.")) {
        echo "A match was found.";
    } else {
        echo "A match was not found.";
    }
    

This is your best bet. As stated at the beginning you can control your regex.

This is directly from php.net

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function check_words($text) {
  $text=$text;
  $bad_words = file('bad_words.txt');
  $bad = explode(" | ",$bad_words[0]);
  $b = '/\W' . implode('\W|\W', $bad) . '\W/i';

  if(preg_match($b, $text)){
    echo $text ." - Contain Bad words!"; other function here
  } else {
    echo $text ." - Not containing bad words :D";
    // other function here
  }
}

Example: check_words('He is good');

This works well although anything after the final / does not seem to get checked, e.g. http://www.mysite.com/thisbit, thisbit seems not to get checked for bad words.

It does work again how ever if it is typed like this: http://www.mysite.com/thisbit/, with the trailing /.

Not sure if this can be fixed or not.

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function check_words($text) {
    $text=$text;
    $bad_words = file('bad_words.txt');
    $bad = explode(" | ",$bad_words[0]);
    $b = '/\W' . implode('\W|\W', $bad) . '\W/i';
    if(preg_match($b, $text)){
        echo $text ." - Contain Bad words!";
        # - other function here
    }
    else{
        echo $text ." - Not containing bad words :D";
        # - other function here
    }

}
# - Example
check_words('He is good');

Hope this can help.. you can put all the bad words in bad_words.txt file.

Arrange the bad words in txt as:

bad_words1 | bad_words2 | bad_words3 | bad_words4 ...

Note: you can also put something like:

bad words 1 | bad words 2 | bad words 3

as long as it is in the "|" format.

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