Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am having a difficult time with how ie and firefox are displaying inline-block. I should probably point out that Google chrome displays it as intended..

<div class="cell"> 
    <div><img src="images/dftg.jpg" /></div> 
    <p>Sean val</p>
</div>

The problem occurs in firefox and ie when i write a longer name in the paragraph above, in the parapgrah above. in firefox and ie, the cell div moves up thereby making the layout look weird and inconsistent.

.cell { 
    display: inline-block;
    display:-moz-inline-stack;
    border: 3px solid #ff0000;
    padding: 7px;
    height: 170px;
    zoom: 1;
    *display: inline;
    _height: 170px;

}

.cell p {
    padding: 10px 25px;
    width: 150px;
}
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You're probably having this problem because you haven't specified any vertical-align.

Try using this:

.cell { 
    display: inline-block;
    vertical-align: top;
    border: 3px solid #ff0000;
    padding: 7px;
    height: 170px;
    zoom: 1;
    *display: inline;
    _height: 170px;
}

You can forget about display: -moz-inline-stack - that's only for Firefox 2, which has very, very low usage.

The article you probably read while "doing research" was this:

http://blog.mozilla.com/webdev/2009/02/20/cross-browser-inline-block/

You should probably read it again, as it does mention using vertical-align.

share|improve this answer
    
@thirtydot....thank u so much, it worked like magic....i thought i tried this though :)))) –  gables20 Apr 10 '11 at 23:25

You should check dates on articles you read. Inline-block has been supported since FF3.

Another obscure-but-useful new feature making its way into Firefox 3 after all the other major browsers support it (mostly) is the inline block. When assigned to an element, a display type of inline-block causes the element to be positioned inline (like a span), but the element's contents are laid out as if the element were a block.

http://ajaxian.com/archives/soft-hyphens-and-inline-block-subtleties-in-firefox-3-rc-1

Anyway, looks like you solved it.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.