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I want to have a row of divs (cells) that don't wrap if the browser is too narrow to fit them.

I've searched Stack, and couldn't find a working answer to what I think should be a simple css question.

The cells have specified width. However I don't want to specify the width of the row, the width should automatically be the width of its child cells.

If the viewport is too narrow to accomodate the rows, then the div should overflow with scrollbars.

Please provide your answer as working code snippet, as I've tried a lot of the solutions I've seen elsewhere (like specify width: 100% and they don't seem to work).

I'm looking for a html/css only solution, no javascript.

<html>
<body>
<style>

.row {
    float:left;
    border: 1px solid yellow;
   width: 100%;
   overflow: auto;
}

.cell {
    float: left;
    border: 1px solid red;
    width: 200px;
    height: 100px;
}
</style>

<div class="row">
    <div class="cell">a</div>
    <div class="cell">b</div>
    <div class="cell">c</div>
</div>


</body>
</html>

At the moment I'm actually hardcoding the width of the row to a really big number.

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1  
did one of the answers below work for you? I'm not having any success with any of them. –  John Fitzpatrick Dec 6 '12 at 10:35
    
I just tried all the answers, and none worked for me. The problem was I needed to center two floated left divs, and prevent the one on the right from being pushed below to the left after the window is resized. –  Bashevis Feb 7 '13 at 20:20

4 Answers 4

The CSS property display: inline-block was designed to address this need. You can read a bit about it here: http://robertnyman.com/2010/02/24/css-display-inline-block-why-it-rocks-and-why-it-sucks/

Below is an example of its use. The key elements are that the row element has white-space: nowrap and the cell elements have display: inline-block. This example should work on most major browsers; a compatibility table is available here: http://caniuse.com/#feat=inline-block

<html>
<body>
<style>

.row {
    float:left;
    border: 1px solid yellow;
    width: 100%;
    overflow: auto;
    white-space: nowrap;
}

.cell {
    display: inline-block;
    border: 1px solid red;
    width: 200px;
    height: 100px;
}
</style>

<div class="row">
    <div class="cell">a</div>
    <div class="cell">b</div>
    <div class="cell">c</div>
</div>


</body>
</html>
share|improve this answer
    
+1; this answer works for me. If all else fails, try <nobr>. –  Cees Timmerman May 3 '13 at 17:06
    
Only works in IE8 mode and better. –  Cees Timmerman May 3 '13 at 17:16
1  
Add <!DOCTYPE html> or <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/strict.dtd"> to the top of the HTML to have IE not default to quirks mode. –  Cees Timmerman May 3 '13 at 17:21

You want to define min-width on row so when it browser is re-sized it does not go below that and wrap.

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I had a somewhat similar problem where a bounded area consisted of an image in a float:left block and a non-float text block. The area has a fluid width. The text would, by design, wrap up along the right side of the image. The trouble was, the text began with an <h2> tag, the first word of which is the tiny word "From." As I resized the window to a smaller width, the non-floated text would, for a certain range of widths, leave only the word "From" at the top of the wrap area, the rest of the text having been squeezed below the float block. My solution was to make the first word of the tag bigger, by replacing the space that followed it with this code, <span style="opacity:0;">x</span> . The effect was to make the first word, instead of "From", "FromxNextWord", where the "x", being invisible, looked like a space. Now my first word was big enough not to be abandoned by the rest of the text block.

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float is designed to do exactly what you don't want it to do. Use relative positioning instead.

This will give you a headstart:

http://www.alistapart.com/articles/flexiblelayouts/

share|improve this answer
6  
relative positioning means I have to manually give the divs co-ordinates. I can't do that. I don't know in advance how many divs there will be, and they will be sortable (dragged around and moved). –  Nicholas Apr 18 '11 at 22:17
    
This got voted down because it didn't answer the question, but it did remind me about absolute positioning which fixed my problem. So an upvote from me for the idea. –  David Feb 7 at 19:16

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