Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Does anyone of you know a lossless compression algorithm, which produces headerless outputs? For example do not store the huffman tree used to compress it? I do not speak about hard coded huffman trees, but I like to know if there is any algorithm that can compress and decompress input without storing some metadata in its output. Or is this even theoretically impossible?

share|improve this question
add comment

5 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Adaptive Huffman coding does exactly that. More generally, the term adaptive coding is used to describe entropy codes with this property. Some dictionary codes have this property too, e.g. run-length encoding (RLE) and Lempel-Ziv-Welch (LZW).

share|improve this answer
add comment

Of course it is posible. Among others, the LZ family of compressors don't need to output anything apart from the compressed data itself, as the dictionary is built on-line as compression (or decompression) progress. You have a lot of reference implementations for those LZ-type algorithms. For example, LZMA, component of 7zip.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Run Length Encoding would be one example

share|improve this answer
    
Even RLE requires some knowledge of what the data is and how the RLE is encoded. The decompression algorithm needs to know if it was counting bits, or bytes, colors, or sound samples, etc. –  Adam Davis Feb 18 '09 at 16:01
    
That is either hard coded into the compression/decompression algorithm itself, or headers. –  Adam Davis Feb 18 '09 at 16:01
    
Yes, but generally it's hard-coded in the algorithm, whereas the tables for huffman coding are generally stored with the compressed data. –  Douglas Leeder Feb 18 '09 at 16:03
add comment

lzo springs to mind. it's used in OpenVPN, with great results

share|improve this answer
add comment

Why are you looking for compression algorithms with headerless compressed output?

Perhaps (a) you have a system like 2-way telephony that needs low-latency streaming compression/decompression. The adaptive coding category of compression algorithms mentioned by Zach Scrivena and the LZ family of dictionary compression algorithms mentioned by Diego Sevilla and Javier are excellent for this kind of application. Practical implementations of these algorithms usually do have a byte or two of metadata at the beginning (making them useless for (b) applications), but that has little or no effect on latency.

Perhaps (b) you are mainly interested in cryptography, and you hear that compress-before-encrypt gives some improved security properties, as long as the compressed text does not have fixed metadata header "crib". Modern compression algorithms aren't (as far as we know) vulnerable to such "cribs", but if you're paranoid you might be interested in "bijective compression" (a, b, c, etc.). It's not possible to detect errors in transmission (flipped bits, inserted bits, deleted bits, etc.) when a receiver gets such compressed output (making these algorithms not especially useful for (a) applications).

Perhaps (c) you are interested in headerless compression for some other reason. Sounds fascinating -- what is that reason?

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.