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I'm trying to find every 10 digit series of numbers within a larger series of numbers using re in Python 2.6.

I'm easily able to grab no overlapping matches, but I want every match in the number series. Eg.

in "123456789123456789"

I should get the following list:

[1234567891,2345678912,3456789123,4567891234,5678912345,6789123456,7891234567,8912345678,9123456789]

I've found references to a "lookahead", but the examples I've seen only show pairs of numbers rather than larger groupings and I haven't been able to convert them beyond the two digits.

As always, any assistance would be most appreciated!

Thanks!

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3  
The presented solutions won't work when the overlapping matches start at the same point, e.g., matching "a|ab|abc" against "abcd" will only return one result. Is there a solution for that that does not involve calling match() multiple times, manually keeping track of the 'end' boundary? –  Vítor De Araújo Oct 28 '11 at 19:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 37 down vote accepted
import re 
s = "123456789123456789"
matches = re.finditer(r'(?=(\d{10}))',s)
results = [int(match.group(1)) for match in matches]
# results: 
# [1234567891,
#  2345678912,
#  3456789123,
#  4567891234,
#  5678912345,
#  6789123456,
#  7891234567,
#  8912345678,
#  9123456789]
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You sir, are fantastic. Thanks! –  danspants Apr 11 '11 at 5:03
    
My answer is at least 2 times faster than this one. But this solution is tricky, I upvote it. –  eyquem Jul 5 '13 at 10:33
    
could anyone explain why it works? –  qkhhly Jul 8 '13 at 17:19
3  
Explanation = instead of searching for the pattern (10 digits), it searches for anything FOLLOWED BY the pattern. So it finds position 0 of the string, position 1 of the string and so on. Then it grabs group(1) - the matching pattern and makes a list of those. VERY cool. –  Tal Weiss Jul 18 '13 at 20:28
1  
I joined StackOverflow, answered questions, and got my reputation up just so I could upvote this answer. I'm stuck with Python 2.4 for now so I can't use the more advanced regex functions of Python 3, and this is just the sort of bizarre trickery I was looking for. –  TheSoundDefense Jul 7 at 17:17

I'm fond of regexes, but they are not needed here.

Simply

s =  "123456789123456789"

n = 10
li = [ s[i:i+n] for i in xrange(len(s)-n+1) ]
print '\n'.join(li)

result

1234567891
2345678912
3456789123
4567891234
5678912345
6789123456
7891234567
8912345678
9123456789
share|improve this answer

You can also try using the new Python regex module, which supports overlapping matches.

>>> import regex as re
>>> s = "123456789123456789"
>>> matches = re.findall(r'\d{10}', s, overlapped=True)
>>> for match in matches: print match
...
1234567891
2345678912
3456789123
4567891234
5678912345
6789123456
7891234567
8912345678
9123456789
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