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Can anyone explain this statement from ISO N3242 §3.2, 2nd point

A member of a set of candidate functions is odr-used if it is selected by overload resolution when referred to from a potentiallyevaluated expression. [ Note: This covers calls to named functions (5.2.2), operator overloading (Clause 13),user-defined conversions (12.3.2), allocation function for placement new (5.3.4), as well as non-default initialization(8.5).

ISO Standard 2003 : says

An overloaded function is used if it is selected by overload resolution when referred to from a potentially-evaluated expression. [Note: this covers calls to named functions (5.2.2), operator overloading (clause 13), user-defined conversions (12.3.2), allocation function for placement new (5.3.4), as well as non-default initialization (8.5).

What is the actual difference in these statements?

Can any one explain this with the help of an example/program?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The terminology "overloaded function" is (slightly) ambiguous between referring to the member or to the set. C++11 clarifies that functions that are never selected from a potentially-evaluated expression are not odr-used.

The term "odr-used" is new with C++11. It essentially means that the given object might be represented in the final, compiled binary file, and that the one-definition rule applies.

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The paragraph was changed to fix the Core Issue #1174. There you can find the example which shows the difference.

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1  
I think that applies more to the preceding sentence, "A virtual member function is odr-used if it is not pure," which was not ultimately changed from C++03. Perhaps they decided that "if" was alright because it is not "if and only if", and the odr-use is implied by the overload selection rule. –  Potatoswatter Apr 11 '11 at 6:45
    
@Krill : what they explained is exactly not this statement(full) ... right ? –  1User Apr 11 '11 at 6:51
    
Yep, Potatoswatter is right, that explains the other part of the statement. Hope this is helpful still. –  Kirill V. Lyadvinsky Apr 11 '11 at 6:56

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