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I need to call the javascript function dynamically after some delay, The function display_1, 2, ... n will be dynamically constructed. My script looks like this, but the function never gets triggered if I use the following code, but if I hardcode the function it just seems to be fine.

function display_1() {
alert(1);
}

function display_2() {
alert(2);
}

function display() {
var prefix = 'display_';
for(var i = 1; i < 3; i++) {
setTimeout(prefix.concat(i), 1000);
}

window.onload = display();
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5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

you have to add the parenthesis so that the function is called:

setTimeout(prefix.concat(i)+"()", 1000);

or simply:

setTimeout(prefix + i + "()", 1000);

Besides of that please note that both functions are called pratically at the same time, because the timers started with ´setTimeout()` start at the same time.

Depending on what you're trying to do you might have a look at setInterval() or start the second timeout at the end of the display_1() function.

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+1 for also mentioning the asynchronous nature of setTimeout. –  xtofl Apr 11 '11 at 7:30
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Instead of going via a string, you may as well group the functions into an array:

function display_1() {...}

function display_2() { ... }

var functions = [ display_1, display_2 ];

function display() {
   for( var i = 0; i != functions.length; ++i ) { 
     setTimeout( functions[i], 1000 );
   }
 }

If you want to go further, you may even leave out the explicit function names:

var functions = [
    function() { /*the function_1 implementation*/ 
    },
    function() { /*the function_2 implementation*/
    }
];
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just curious: is there a special reason for using i != functions.length instead of i < functions.length? –  Udo G Apr 11 '11 at 7:29
1  
also, I think there is a typo: the parenthesis shouldn't be there in the first argument to setTimeout() since you want to pass the function reference and not call it immediately. –  Udo G Apr 11 '11 at 7:34
    
@Udo G: thanks. –  xtofl Apr 11 '11 at 7:39
    
@Udo: the i != imax is a way to make sure that after you leave the loop, i == imax. If you use i < imax, after the loop, i >= imax. If you want to proof that only imax elements have been iterated over, you need to involve recursion in your proof. –  xtofl Apr 11 '11 at 7:41
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It should be

function display_1() {
alert(1);
}

function display_2() {
alert(2);
}

function display() {
var prefix = 'display_';
for(var i = 1; i < 3; i++) {
setTimeout(prefix.concat(i)+'()', 1000);
}
}

window.onload = display;
  1. the string passed to setTimeout should call the function
  2. onload should be set to a function, not its return value
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setInterval('load_testimonial()',5000);//first parameter is your function or what ever the code u want to execute, and second is time in millisecond..

this will help you to execute your function for every given time.

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If you really want a 1000ms delay between executing the functions, you could do something like this:

window.onload = function() {
    var n = 0;
    var functions = [
        function() {
            alert(1);
            setTimeout(functions[n++], 1000);
        },
        function() {
            alert(2);
            setTimeout(functions[n++], 1000);
        },
        function() {
            alert(3);
        }
    ];
    setTimeout(functions[n++], 1000);
};

(rewrite it in a less-repetitive nature if needed)

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