Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there a way by which we can find out if a clip board paste event occurred in a rich text box? This event would be used in order to do certain stuff, with the pasted block of text.

thanks

Here is my code

 protected override void WndProc(ref System.Windows.Forms.Message m)
    {
        if (m.Msg == WM_PASTE)
        {
            OnPasteOccurred();
            MessageBox.Show("Pas");
        }
        if (m.Msg == 0x000F)
        {
            if (PaintControl)
            {
                base.WndProc(ref m);
            }
            else
            {
                m.Result = IntPtr.Zero;
            }
        }
        else
        {
            base.WndProc(ref m);
        }
    }

Edit

I wish to do some syntax highlighting or indentation based on paste events, something which this particular code editor seems to be doing very efficiently. I don't know how it is doing it. Would require help in this particular direction. I am pretty sure that there must some native Win32 code or something like that can be intercepted. I have tried tracking down keys, mouse events and it is not pretty.

share|improve this question
    
A quick web search reveals that RichTextBox doesn't handle paste events by sending WM_PASTE to itself. So I'm out of ideas. –  David Heffernan Apr 11 '11 at 9:12
    
You may be able to wrap the control in your own custom class and override the Paste method. This is, of course, assuming that's the method being called on a paste. –  Brad Christie Apr 14 '11 at 15:04
    
Hmm, in .NET 2.0, you cannot override the paste() method, and probably the reason is given by @David above. –  redDragonzz Apr 15 '11 at 5:56
    
Can't you just check if your rich text control has focus and if it has, then paste was in it? –  Pasi Savolainen Apr 12 '12 at 12:08

2 Answers 2

up vote 12 down vote accepted

It's a little bit tricky to detect a paste operation in the RichTextBox.

First solution may be to detect the WM_PASTE message overriding the WndProc but unfortunately the control doesn't send that message to itself when it performs a paste operation.

Naïve detection

To detect the keyboard events may work (you have to override the OnKeyDown function) then check if the key combinations (CTRL+V and SHIFT+INS). Something like this:

protected override OnKeyDown(KeyEventArgs e)
{
     bool ctrlV = e.Modifiers == Keys.Control && e.KeyCode == Keys.V;
     bool shiftIns = e.Modifiers == Keys.Shift && e.KeyCode == Keys.Insert;

     if (ctrlV || shiftIns)
         DoSomething();
}

It works well but you can't catch the paste operation made using the mouse (right click to open the context menu) and the paste operations made via drag & drop. If you do not need them you can use this solution (at least it's simply and straightforward).

Better detection

Assumption: when user types inside the RichTextBox he inserts one character per time. How can you use this? Well, when you detect a bigger change you detected a paste operation because user can't type more than once character per time (ok, you can argue that it's not always true because of UNICODE surrogates). See also this post for a VB.NET version.

private int _previousLength = 0;

private void richTextBox_TextChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
   int currentLength = richTextBox.Text.Length;
   if (Math.Abs(currentLength - _previousLength) > 1)
      ProcessAllLines();

   _previousLength = currentLength;
}

Please note that you can't (because of how different IMEs work) use OnKeyDown (or similar). This works well only for western languages but it has problems with UNICODE stuff (because, for example, String.Length property may be increased by two Char when user typed a single character. See also this post for much more details about this (well it's a strongly suggested reading even, even if - in this case - you don't care about it). In that post you'll also find code for a better algorithm to determine string length. In short you have to replace:

   int currentLength = richTextBox.Text.Length;

With this:

   int currentLength = StringInfo.GetTextElementEnumerator(richTextBox.Text)
       .Cast<string>()
       .Count();

After all this effort you may realize that...user can even paste a single character and it may go undetected. You're right, that's why this is a better detection instead of a perfect solution.

Perfect solution

The perfect solution (if you're running on Windows 8) of course exists, the native rich edit control sends an EN_CLIPFORMAT notification message. It's intended to notify a rich edit control's parent window that a paste occurred with a particular clipboard format. You can then override the WndProc of its parent to detect the WM_NOTIFY message for this notification. Anyway it's not few lines of code, check this MSDN article for details.

share|improve this answer
    
isn't the msdn one applying to windows 8 only? –  redDragonzz May 18 '12 at 0:20
    
@redDragonzz sadly...yes, that's a notification message for Windows 8 only. I'll update my answer to make it clear! –  Adriano Repetti May 18 '12 at 7:20
    
@redDragonzz update: I guess a "true" syntax highligh algorithm won't suffer for poor performance 'cause he won't work on the full text and it'll do it in background on another thread while you're typing. Did you take a look to the code of the (old) SharpDevelop IDE? They did provide both colors and intellisense. –  Adriano Repetti May 20 '12 at 21:25

Starting from .Net 3.0, there is a built-in method to detect the paste event:

DataObject.AddPastingHandler(this, OnPaste);

Just call this method in the constructor. If you want for example handle the paste event yourself as if the user entered the text manually, you can use

private void OnPaste(object sender, DataObjectPastingEventArgs e)
{
    if (e.DataObject.GetDataPresent(typeof(string)))
    {
        var text = (string)e.DataObject.GetData(typeof(string));
        var composition = new TextComposition(InputManager.Current, this, text);
        TextCompositionManager.StartComposition(composition);
    }

    e.CancelCommand();
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Isn't this WPF not winforms? –  CodesInChaos Oct 14 '14 at 9:12
    
ups. You are right. Didn't notice the tag... –  LionAM Oct 17 '14 at 15:09

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.