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I have an application that when run at home works fine, however when ran on school computers(Windows XP) i get the following message. (This is recompiling it, not just running the .exe)- In Delphi 2005

First chance exception at $7C81EB33. Exception class EAccessViolation with message 'Access violation at address 0045E5E2 in module 'Project2.exe'. Read of address 00000198'. Process Project2.exe (440)

Code: Ignoring unneeded stuff.

        Image1: TImage; // Image(all the way to 72) 
        Timer1: TTimer; Timer2: TTimer;   
        procedure Button1Click(Sender: TObject);
        procedure FormCreate(Sender: TObject);
        procedure SomeOtherProcedure(Sender: TImage);
        procedure Timer1Timer(Sender: TObject);
        procedure Timer2Timer(Sender: TObject);
          private
        { private declarations }
      public
        { public declarations }
      end;
    var
      Form1: TForm1;
      left : integer;
      top  : integer;
      gap  : integer;
      type
        coordinates = record
          row : integer ;
          col : integer;
        end;

      var
      picarray : array[0..5,0..5] of timage;
      thiscover, midcover, lastcover : timage;
      imageindex : array[0..5,0..5] of integer;
      picloc: array[0..3] of coordinates;
      clickcount, pairsfound, attemptcount : integer;
implementation
{$R *.lfm}
procedure initialise();
var
i, j, whichcol, whichrow : integer;
begin
        for i := 0 to 5 do
        for j := 0 to 5 do
        imageindex[i,j] := -1; // not used
        randomize;
        for i := 0 to 11 do
        for j := 1 to 3 do
        begin
        repeat
          begin
          whichcol := random(6) ;
          whichrow := random(6)  ;
          end;
        until imageindex[whichcol, whichrow] = -1;
        picarray[whichcol, whichrow].Picture.LoadFromFile('C:\Users\Hayden\Pictures\'+ inttostr(I+1) +'.jpg');
        imageindex[whichcol, whichrow] := I  ;
        end;
        clickcount := 0  ;            //
        pairsfound := 0    ;
        attemptcount := 0  ;
        end;

    procedure TForm1.FormCreate(Sender: TObject);
var
cpic : tcomponent;
whichcol: integer;
whichrow : integer;
begin
gap := image2.left - image1.left;
top := image1.Top;
left := image1.left;
for cpic in form1 do
begin
     if (cpic.ClassType = timage) and (cpic.Tag = 10) then
     begin
     whichcol := (timage(cpic).left - left) div gap;
     whichrow := (timage(cpic).Top - top) div gap;
     picarray[whichcol, whichrow] := timage(cpic)   ;
end;
end;
initialise;
end;

Line >>> picarray[whichcol, whichrow].Picture.LoadFromFile('C:\Users\Hayden\Pictures\'+ inttostr(I+1) +'.jpg'); seems to cause the error. And if it is a coding error, what is the correct way to do this?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

First, I'm going to clean up your code a little, because as it stands, it's very difficult to figure what's going on. I highly recommend you get into the habit of taking a few minutes to keep your code clearly formatted - it will save you hours of debugging.

I've applied only the following simple changes: Indentation, Blank lines, and liberal use of begin .. end;

var
  picarray : array[0..5,0..5] of timage;
  thiscover, midcover, lastcover : timage;
  imageindex : array[0..5,0..5] of integer;
  picloc: array[0..3] of coordinates;
  clickcount, pairsfound, attemptcount : integer;

implementation

{$R *.lfm}
procedure initialise();
var
  i, j, whichcol, whichrow : integer;
begin
  for i := 0 to 5 do
  begin
    for j := 0 to 5 do
    begin
      //It's clear you're initialising the 36 entries of imageindex to -1
      imageindex[i,j] := -1; // not used
    end;
  end;

  randomize;
  for i := 0 to 11 do
  begin
    for j := 1 to 3 do
    begin
      //This loop also runs 36 times, so it fills the whole of imageindex with new values
      //It also loads all 36 entries of picarray with an image specfied by the current value of i
      //The approach is dangerous because it depends on the 'loop sizes' matching,
      //there are much safer ways of doing this, but it works
      repeat
        begin //This being one of the only 2 begin..end's you provided inside this is routine is pointless because repeat..until implies it.
          whichcol := random(6) ;
          whichrow := random(6)  ;
        end;
      until imageindex[whichcol, whichrow] = -1;

      //This line itself will throw an access violation if picarray[whichcol, whichrow] doesn't 
      //contain a valid TImage instance... we have to check other code to confirm that possibility
      picarray[whichcol, whichrow].Picture.LoadFromFile('C:\Users\Hayden\Pictures\' + inttostr(I+1) + '.jpg');
      imageindex[whichcol, whichrow] := I  ;
    end;
  end;

  clickcount := 0  ;            //
  pairsfound := 0    ;
  attemptcount := 0  ;
end;

Moving on to the next piece of code:

procedure TForm1.FormCreate(Sender: TObject);
var
  cpic : tcomponent;
  whichcol: integer;
  whichrow : integer;
begin
  gap := image2.left - image1.left;
  top := image1.Top;
  left := image1.left;
  for cpic in form1 do
  begin
    //This loop attempts to assign existing TImage instances to picarray
    //However, the way you're going about it is extremely dangerous and unreliable.
    //You're trying to use the position of a component on the form to determine its
    //position in the array.
    //There are many things that could go wrong here, but since this seems to be a
    //homework excercise, I'll just point you in the right direction - you need
    //to debug this code.
    if (cpic.ClassType = timage) and (cpic.Tag = 10) then
    begin
      whichcol := (timage(cpic).left - left) div gap;
      whichrow := (timage(cpic).Top - top) div gap;
      picarray[whichcol, whichrow] := timage(cpic)   ;
    end;
  end;

  //Here you call initialise, which as I said before, will
  //cause an Access Violation if picarray is not correctly 'set up'
  //The previous code in this method certainly has a bug which is 
  //preventing one or more picarray entries from being assigned a 
  //valid TImage instance.
  //You could write a simple for I := 0 to 5, for J := 0 to 5 loop
  //here to check each of picarray entries and pinpoint which is 
  //incorrect to aid your debugging of the pevious loop.
  initialise;
end;
share|improve this answer
    
Wow, that was very insightful. I will say I'm not very experienced with Delphi, and I don't really like it. But I want to try and keep at it until I get it right. Thanks, You really put some effort in. –  Skeela87 Apr 27 '11 at 14:10

The critical section is the initialization of picarray. You can't be sure that every array element is assigned with a TImage component. If at least one Image has a wrong left or top you have a double assignment to one element and another is left nil. This will result in an Access Violation when you use it for the first time e.g. in picarray[whichcol, whichrow].Picture.LoadFromFile.

I would recommend to redesign the picarray initalization with for loops for every dimension. To get the correct TImage I would name them like 'Image_2_3' and get the instances in the loop by name.

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you can check if the file exists and try to catch the exception to display a meaningful message

try
  if FileExists('C:\Users\Hayden\Pictures\'+ inttostr(I+1) +'.jpg') then
    picarray[whichcol, whichrow].Picture.LoadFromFile('C:\Users\Hayden\Pictures\'+ inttostr(I+1) +'.jpg');
  else 
    ShowMessage("File not found");
except
  on E : Exception do
    ShowMessage(E.ClassName+' error raised, with message : '+E.Message);
end;
share|improve this answer
2  
Thanks for the reply, but the file did exist, it normally results in a 'file not found' error anyhow. –  Skeela87 Apr 11 '11 at 8:15
1  
that's true, but the try-catch is for all errors not only 'file not found'.. E.Message might be useful, helped me many times. –  George L Apr 11 '11 at 8:40
    
Alright, I'll have to check tomorrow. I'll report back on here. Thanks –  Skeela87 Apr 11 '11 at 8:48
1  
George, catching the exception and displaying the message is only helpful if you've already released the software to users and cannot reproduce the problem locally (and even then, it's not as good as using a real exception library, like EurekaLog or MadExcept). In this case, we already know which line caused the exception, which exception class was thrown, and what its message was. Your suggested code would add no information to the investigation. –  Rob Kennedy Apr 11 '11 at 16:52
    
Actually, such a style of catching an exception is very very bad! 1) Doing nothing (assuming default Application Exception Handler) a message pops up in any case. 2) The difference is that you are no longer in an exception state, so now after telling the user about the problem, you are no longer telling the rest of the program. Resulting in the decidely nasty potential of knock-on errors down the line. –  Craig Young Apr 25 '11 at 12:28

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