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I have a question concerning the structure of an MVC application. Suppose we have to realize a web-based application composed by several modules, such as shopping cart, store browser(end-user), store manager(admin) and so on.

It is of course possible to create one controller and use the routing to submit the requests to a specific controller's action method. However this would make the code quite messy and hinder the practice to vertically structure the application, namely to identify and distinguish which views, models and controllers are involved to fulfill a specific requirement (an example is given by Phil Haack).

Another approach is to use one controller for each application section, for instance one controller made available for end-user operations, another for the store administrator, another one for queries made by the shipping department and so on. The drawback to this approach is to have too many controllers that mess up your code, too dedicated for specific tasks and so difficult to reuse.

According to this two extreme situation, what is the best way to organize your controllers and routing policies? Do you use a structured approach or it depends on the type of application you are developing?

Thanks

Francesco

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

It is of course possible to create one controller and use the routing to submit the requests to a specific controller's action method. [...]

Another approach is to use one controller for each application section, [...]

You're overlooking a third alternative, which is the most common one. In general you should have one controller per resource. A resource is a model that is publicly exposed. In your specific storefront application, the resources would be things like Products, Orders, Customers, etc.

This is typically the proper level of abstraction, because controllers usually don't need to know about models other than the resources they touch. A controller that touches more than one resource should be viewed with some skepticism, since it's violating the single-responsibility principle.

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thanks for your answer. I understand the concept underneath the organization by resource, really tidy and intuitive. However how do you deal with situations when the resource under consideration is, in terms of ER relationships, a table (or class) representing an association relationship? For instance, suppose I have the order resource that associates customers with products and I want to give to non-registered end-users the opportunity to create an order as well as register the user by adding his/her data to the Customer resource. – CiccioMiami Apr 11 '11 at 12:15
    
Would you treat the Order resource as a distinct resource with his own controller or group Order specific action methods under the Customer controller? – CiccioMiami Apr 11 '11 at 12:16
    
If you can do things individually with an Order (like "show me a particular order"), I would definitely treat Order as its own resource. This is particularly true if you can do this without any reference to other entities. (Also, your example is somewhat misleading, since that's not really an association relationship. An order could very well stand on its own without referencing a product or customer.) – John Feminella Apr 11 '11 at 12:42
    
thanks for your answer. I know my example was somewhat misleading, I just wanted to use the classes you mentioned. You got the answer ;-) – CiccioMiami Apr 11 '11 at 13:19

You should try to follow REST as much as possible

Basically - that means controller for each 'collection' (Your entity).

If Your controllers will be RESTful, other parts (routing, views) will fit themselves accordingly.

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