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This is what the weird view looks like, in Chrome on OS X on first load:

Weird View

That blue bar running right across the screen is actually the navigation bar that should be at the top of the screen. See below.

This is what the original view looks like, and this is what it reverts to - once I scroll down (so that portion of the screen disappears) and scroll back up:

Original View

Edit1: I don't even know what code to post, if any because it is kinda random. If you ask some questions though, maybe something might jump out and I will know what code to either post or look at.

Thanks.

Edit2: Here is the code for the div#navigation:

<div id="navigation"> 
        <div id="quota-info"> 
            Plan: Chameleon<br /> 
            # of Projects: 2 / 20<br /> 
            # of Clients: 2 / 15<br /> 
            Storage: 10.8 MB / 10.0GB <br /> 
        </div> 

        <div id="user-info"> 
            <span class="username">Hi Test</span><br /> 
            Name: Test User<br /> 
            Email: test@abc.com<br /> 
            Last Logged In: about 2 hours ago<br /> 

        </div> 


        <ul> 
            <li><a href="/home/index"><img src="logo.png" /></a></li> 
            <li id="dashboard"><a href="/home/index">Dashboard</a></li> 
            <li id="settings"><a href="/settings">Settings</a></li> 
            <li id="logout"><a href="/logout">Logout</a></li> 
        </ul> 
    </div> 

Here is the CSS:

#navigation {
    font-family: Verdana, Arial,  sans-serif;
    font-size: 13px;
    background: #2d343f;
    background-image: url('../images/nav-textured-bg.png');
    background-repeat: repeat;
    padding: 5px 5px;
    margin: 0px auto;
    position: relative;
    height: 75px;   
}

#navigation a {
    text-decoration: none;
    padding: 10px 15px;   
    display: inline;
    height: 35px; 
    line-height: 35px;
    color: #c6c8cb;
}

#navigation ul {
    width: 100%;
    margin: 0 auto;
    text-align: center;
}

#navigation li {
    width: 100%;    
    display: inline;
    list-style-type: none;
}

#navigation li img {
    position: relative;
    top: 15px;
}

Edit 3:

Here is another screenshot of how it looks when I scroll up. The top navigational bar is still there. This blue thing is not even the menu, it's like a screenshot of it. When I hover over the menu links, they don't work. Wierder Screenshot

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1  
W@hat website or program is this? If this is your own, can you supply some code? There's no way to help you by just looking at screenshots. –  Rodin Apr 11 '11 at 11:14
    
Can you post the code and styles for your header (the blue bar)? –  Liam Spencer Apr 11 '11 at 11:17
    
Done. Refresh :) –  marcamillion Apr 11 '11 at 11:21
2  
Post a link of the live site please. The bug is quite unique so it will be hard to debug without a live sample. –  easwee Apr 11 '11 at 12:55
2  
My first checks would be to validate your html and css and to also shut down Chrome and restart it to see if the issue persists. Also can you confirm this isn't happening in any other browser? –  Pete Apr 11 '11 at 21:57

2 Answers 2

You have to create a reduction. Start with a copy of the actual page and then remove stuff not related to the problem, one by one, until it disappears. Then you'll see what's causing it, whether it's a browser bug and what you can do to fix it.

PS: If it's a browser bug, don't neglect to report it. It's a web developer's responsibility.

share|improve this answer
    
That might be a bit tricky, given that it's not just a plain CSS/html site. It's a Rails app. So reduction might be very difficult. But if I do find that it is a browser bug, I will surely report it. –  marcamillion Apr 12 '11 at 16:42
    
This is a good suggestion. Even with it being a Rails app it should be fairly straight forward to either comment out partials or to simply cut some areas of the view from your code. –  Pete Apr 12 '11 at 16:47
3  
If it's generated by server side code, save the downloaded html page and make the reduction from that. :) –  Lea Verou Apr 13 '11 at 17:33
    
Interesting....just might do that. Thanks. –  marcamillion Apr 14 '11 at 12:57

I would start by cleaning up some of your CSS.

#navigation {
    font-family: Verdana, Arial,  sans-serif;
    font-size: 13px;
    background: #2d343f;
    background-image: url('../images/nav-textured-bg.png');
    background-repeat: repeat;
    padding: 5px 5px;
    margin: 0px auto; <--- see below
    position: relative;
    height: 75px;   
}

this should be margin:0 since it's a block element. Block elements take up the entire line, so trying to center it makes no sense.

#navigation a {
    text-decoration: none;
    padding: 10px 15px;   
    display: inline; <--- conflict (see below)
    height: 35px;   <--- conflict (see below)
    line-height: 35px;
    color: #c6c8cb;
}

Inline elements can't have a width or height applied to them, but some browsers when you try to will automatically convert any inline element to inline-block for you. If that is what you want, you should specify it, otherwise drop the height.

#navigation ul {
    width: 100%;
    margin: 0 auto;  <-- see below
    text-align: center;
}

Centering an item with 100% width does not make sense here

#navigation li {
    width: 100%;  <--- conflict
    display: inline; <--- conflict
    list-style-type: none;
}

#navigation li img {
    position: relative;
    top: 15px;
}
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