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For me the most understandable description of going about 1NF so far I found is ‘A primary key is a column (or group of columns) that uniquely identifies each row. ‘ on www.phlonx.com I understand that redundancy means per key there shouldn’t be more than 1 value to each row. More than 1 value would then be ‘redundant’. Right?

Still I manage to screw up 1 NF a lot of times. I posted a question for my online pizzashop http://foo.com pizzashop here

where I was confused about something in the second normal form only to notice I started off wrong in 1 NF. Right now I’m thinking that I need 3 keys in 1NF in order to uniquely identify each row. In this case, I’m finding that order_id, pizza_id, and topping_id will do that for me. So that’s 3 columns. Because if you want to know which particular pizza is which you need to know what order_id it has what type of pizza (pizza_id) and what topping is on there. If you know that, you can look up all the rest. Yet, from an answer to previous question this seems to be wrong, because topping_id goes to a different table which I don’t understand. Here’s the list of columns:

Order_id
Order_date
Customer_id
Customer_name
Phone
Promotion
Blacklist Y or N
Customer_address
ZIP_code
City
E_mail
Pizza_id
Pizza_name
Size
Pizza_price
Amount
Topping_id
Topping_name
Topping_prijs
Availabitly
Delivery_id
Delivery_zone
Deliveryguy_id
Deliveryguy_name
Delivery Y or N

Edit: I marked the id's for the first concatenated key in bold. They are only a list of columns, unnormalized. They're not 1 table or 3 tables or anything

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So what IS the question? ;-) –  Gabor Kulcsar Apr 11 '11 at 11:18
    
Do you have all those columns in a single table?? That would most definitely violate 2NF –  marc_s Apr 11 '11 at 11:19
    
@ Gabor Kulcsar my question is: Am I going about this the correct way? and if not why not? @mar_s: no this is not second normal form nor are the above tables leave alone one big table. It's a question about the first normal form and its primary key –  Immers Apr 11 '11 at 11:21
    
I still don't get it. Why would you want to squeeze everything into one table? This is not a requirement of 1NF... it's just plain wrong. –  Gabor Kulcsar Apr 11 '11 at 11:27
    
@ Gabor: The list of columns above isn't a table to start with. It's just a list of columns. –  Immers Apr 11 '11 at 11:29

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

use Object Role Modelling (say with NORMA) to capture your information about the design, press the button and it spits out SQL.

This will be easier than having you going back and forth between 1NF, 2NF etc. An ORM design is guaranteed to be in 5NF.

Some notes:

  • you can have composite keys
  • surrogate keys may be added after both conceptual and logical design: you have added them up front which is bad. They are added because of the RDBMS performance, not at design time
  • have you read several sources on 1NF?
  • start with plain english and some facts. Which is what ORM does with verbalisation.

So:

  1. A Customer has many pizzas (zero to n)
  2. A pizza has many toppings (zero to n)
  3. A customer has an address
  4. A pizza has a base
  5. ...
share|improve this answer
    
Yes I've definately read several resources on 1NF and the thing is the more I read the more confused I get that's why I was asking this question. I've been struggling with normalisation for too long and it's frustrating the hell out of me. Like when I use the human language technique, I come with different results than when I would use the codd rules strictly. I get confused about my coach saying you should be able to normalise without knowing what your column names mean. Other people say to use your common sense and go with what seems logical to you. –  Immers Apr 11 '11 at 12:06
1  
@Jack_Anyway: You should be able to normalise without knowing what your column names mean only if you know (or assume) all the functional dependencies that exist in your model (and there are algorithms that tell you how to do that). Then it is possible. However, FDs are either extrapolated from data or deduced from the meaning (semantics) of the model you are designing, so there are natural and deep overlaps between the design and normalisation. –  Unreason Apr 12 '11 at 12:13
    
Cool I kindof get it. It doesn't have to be an either/or thing. of course. –  Immers Apr 12 '11 at 13:43

I'd use some more tables for this, to remove duplication for customers, orders, toppings and pizze:

Table: Customer

   Customer_id
    Customer_name
    Customer_name
    Phone
    Promotion
    Blacklist Y or N
    Customer_address
    ZIP_code
    City
    E_mail

Table: Order

Order_id
Order_date
Customer_id
Delivery_zone
Deliveryguy_id
Deliveryguy_name
Delivery Y or N

Table: Order_Details

Order_ID (FK on Order)
Pizza_ID (FK on Pizza)
Amount

Table: Pizza

Pizza_id
Pizza_name
Size
Pizza_price

Table: Topping

Topping_id
Topping_name
Topping_prijs
Availabitly

Table: Pizza_Topping

Pizza_ID
Topping_ID

Pizza_topping and Order_details are so-called interselection tables ("helper" tables for modelling a m:n relationship between two tables).

Now suppose we have just one pizza, some toppings and our customer Billy Smith orders 2 quattro stagione pizze - our tables will contain this content:

Pizza(Pizza_ID, Pizza_name, Pizza_price)

  1 Quattro stagioni 12€

Topping(Topping_id, topping_name, topping_price)

  1 Mozzarrella 0,50€
  2 Prosciutto 0,70€
  3 Salami 0,50€

Pizza_Topping(Pizza_ID, Topping_ID)

 1 1
 1 3

(here, a quattro stagioni pizza contains only Mozzarrella and Salami).

Order(order_ID, Customer_name - rest omitted)

1 Billy Smith

Order_Details(order_id, Pizza_id, amount)

1 1 2  

I've removed delivery ID, since for me, there is no distinction between an Order and a delivery - or do you support partial deliveries?

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On 1NF, from wikipedia, quoting Date:

According to Date's definition of 1NF, a table is in 1NF if and only if it is "isomorphic to some relation", which means, specifically, that it satisfies the following five conditions:

  • There's no top-to-bottom ordering to the rows.
  • There's no left-to-right ordering to the columns.
  • There are no duplicate rows.
  • Every row-and-column intersection contains exactly one value from the applicable domain (and nothing else).
  • All columns are regular [i.e. rows have no hidden components such as row IDs, object IDs, or hidden timestamps].

    —Chris Date, "What First Normal Form Really Means", pp. 127–8[4]

First two are guaranteed in any modern RDBMS.

Duplicate rows are possible in modern RDBMS - however, only if you don't have primary keys (or other unique constraints).

The fourth one is the hardest one (and depends on the semantics of your model) - for example your field Customer_address might be breaking 1NF. Might be, because if you make a contract with yourself (and any potential user of the system) that you will always look at the address as a whole and will not want to separate street name, street number and or floor, you could still claim that 1NF is not broken.

It would be more proper to break the customer address, but there are complexities there with which you would then need to address and which might bring no benefit (provided that you will never have to look a the sub-atomic part of the address line).

The fifth one is broken by some modern RDBMs, however the real importance is that your model nor system should depend on hidden elements, which is normally true - even if your RDBMS uses OIDs internally for certain operations, unless you start to use them for non-administrative, non-maintenance tasks, you can consider it not breaking the 1NF.

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You're correct but it doesn't really help the OP: they need practical help I suspect... –  gbn Apr 12 '11 at 12:02
    
@gbn, that's an assumption! :) Based only on the fact that your answer got accepted and voted up! :) –  Unreason Apr 12 '11 at 12:15
    
Nope, based on the OP's question. Not everyone understands relational or even plain set theory... –  gbn Apr 12 '11 at 13:19
    
It's true that I've gone through quite some theory and more theory isn't helping me at the momemnt. –  Immers Apr 12 '11 at 13:42

The strengths of relational databases come from separating information into different tables. One useful way of looking at tables is first to identify as entity tables those concepts which are relatively permanent (in your case, probably Pizza, Customer, Topping, Deliveryguy). Then you think about the relations between them (in your case, Order, Delivery ). The relational tables link together the entity tables by having foreign keys pointing to the relevant entities: an Order has foreign keys to Customer, Pizza, Topping); a Delivery has foreign keys to Deliveryguy and Order. And, yes, relations can link relations, not just entities.

Only in such a context can you achieve anything like normalization. Tossing a bunch of attributes into one singular table does not make your database relational in any meaningful sense.

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