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Before I start writing huge swathes of code that don't work I thought I'd ask this question.

event.preventDefault() only cancels the default action of the click event doesn't it?

Theoretically I should be able to bind mutiple click event handlers in jQuery to a given target to perform different actions like Ajax posts and Google tracking.

Am I wrong?

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like??? perhaps the answer is yes!!! –  Santosh Linkha Apr 11 '11 at 11:44
    
It cancels the default action of the event the event handler is execute for. –  Felix Kling Apr 11 '11 at 11:47
    
@diEcho: stop is Prototype, not jQuery (in jQuery, stop relates to animations, not events). And end relates to matched set filtering, not events. –  T.J. Crowder Apr 11 '11 at 11:51
    
@TJ thanks for the knowledge –  diEcho Apr 11 '11 at 11:53
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1 Answer 1

up vote 15 down vote accepted

event.preventDefault() only cancels the default action of the click event doesn't it?

It cancels the browser's default action of the event (not just the click event) (W3C docs, jQuery docs). So for instance, in the form submit event, it prevents the form being submitted by the browser. It doesn't stop anything you're doing in code, and it doesn't stop bubbling; that's what stopPropagation is for (W3C docs, jQuery docs).

So say you have a link in a div, and you have the click event hooked on both the link and the div. If the link's event handler calls preventDefault, the browser won't do its default action (following the link), but the event continues to bubble up the DOM to the link's parent element, the div, and so you'll see the event on your click handler there, too. Any actions you're taking in code in either handler will be unaffected by your calling preventDefault.

In your comment below, you ask about multiple handlers on the same element. Neither preventDefault nor stopPropagation affects those, they'll still get fired...unless you use stopImmediatePropagation, which tells jQuery to stop the event dead in its tracks (but doesn't prevent the browser's default action).

I should probably round this out by saying that if you return false from your event handler, that tells jQuery to prevent the default and stop bubbling. It's just like calling preventDefault and stopPropagation. It's a handy shortcut form for when your event handler is taking full control of the event.

So, given this HTML:

<div id='foo'><a href='http://stackoverflow.com'>Q&amp;A</a></div>

Example 1:

// Here we're preventing the default but not stopping bubbling,
// and so the browser won't follow the link, but the div will
// see the event and the alert will fire.
$("#foo").click(function() {
    alert("foo clicked");
});
$("#foo a").click(function(event) {
    event.preventDefault();
});

Example 2:

// Here we're stopping propagation and not preventing the default;
// the browser will follow the link and the div will not be given
// a chance to process the event (no alert, and more to the point,
// code in the div's handler can't prevent the default)
$("#foo").click(function() {
    alert("foo clicked");
});
$("#foo a").click(function(event) {
    event.stopPropagation();
});

Example 3 (you'll only rarely see this):

// Here we're doing both, and so the browser doesn't follow the
// link and the div doesn't see the event (no alert).
$("#foo").click(function() {
    alert("foo clicked");
});
$("#foo a").click(function(event) {
    event.preventDefault();
    event.stopPropagation();
});

Example 4:

// Shorter version of Example 3, exactly the same effect
$("#foo").click(function() {
    alert("foo clicked");
});
$("#foo a").click(function() {
    return false;
});
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J: Sorry Yeah I meant all event's not just click. I've not woken up yet today.... So just to clarify. I could have a click event bound to a link to perform a vote or suchlike but separately I could have another click event bound to that link to do tracking without either interfering with each other? –  James South Apr 11 '11 at 12:01
    
@James: That's right, other event handlers are not affected, just the browser's default action. Example There is a way to tell jQuery to stop an event dead in its tracks: stopImmediatePropagation. If you used that, your handlers would interfere with each other: Example –  T.J. Crowder Apr 11 '11 at 12:05
    
J: Wow... That's a hell of an answer! Very much appreciated. –  James South Apr 11 '11 at 12:06
    
@James: :-) No worries, glad that helped. –  T.J. Crowder Apr 11 '11 at 12:08
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