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i'm a new one to learn assembly. i write a c file:

#include <stdlib.h>

int max( int c )
{
        int d;
        d = c + 1;

        return d;
}

int main( void )
{
        int a = 0;
        int b;
        b = max( a );

        return 0;
}

and i use gcc -S as01.c and create a assembly file.

        .file   "as01.c"
        .text
.globl max
        .type   max, @function
max:
        pushl   %ebp
        movl    %esp, %ebp
        subl    $32, %esp
        movl    $0, -4(%ebp)
        movl    $1, -24(%ebp)
        movl    $2, -20(%ebp)
        movl    $3, -16(%ebp)
        movl    $4, -12(%ebp)
        movl    $6, -8(%ebp)
        movl    8(%ebp), %eax
        addl    $1, %eax
        movl    %eax, -4(%ebp)
        movl    -4(%ebp), %eax
        leave
        ret
        .size   max, .-max
.globl main
        .type   main, @function
main:
        pushl   %ebp
        movl    %esp, %ebp
        subl    $20, %esp
        movl    $0, -4(%ebp)
        movl    -4(%ebp), %eax
        movl    %eax, (%esp)
        call    max
        movl    %eax, -8(%ebp)
"as01.s" 38L, 638C          

i' confused, beacuse movl %eax, -4(%ebp) movl -4(%ebp), %eax in max(), i know that %eax is used for returning the value of any function. I think %eax is a temporarily register for store the c + 1. This is right? thank you for your answer.

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1  
what's your platform? When ask questions about assembly, I think you'd better let us know your OS and compiler. Are you working on a 64-bit platform? –  Summer_More_More_Tea Apr 11 '11 at 12:31
4  
When using gcc -S to see assembler output, you're highly recommended to use -Os. Unoptimised assembler is hugely verbose and full of useless junk. Optimised assembler is, perversely, much easier to read. –  David Given Apr 11 '11 at 12:46

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You don't have optimisation turned on, so the compiler is generating really bad code. The primary storage for all your values is in the stack frame, and values are loaded into registers only long enough to do the calculations.

The code actually breaks down into:

    pushl   %ebp
    movl    %esp, %ebp
    subl    $32, %esp

Standard function prologue, setting up a new stack frame, and reserving 50 bytes for the stack frame.

    movl    $0, -4(%ebp)
    movl    $1, -24(%ebp)
    movl    $2, -20(%ebp)
    movl    $3, -16(%ebp)
    movl    $4, -12(%ebp)
    movl    $6, -8(%ebp)

Fill the stack frame with dummy values (presumably as a debugging aid).

    movl    8(%ebp), %eax
    addl    $1, %eax
    movl    %eax, -4(%ebp)

Read the parameter c out of the stack frame, add one to it, store it into a (different) stack slot.

    movl    -4(%ebp), %eax
    leave
    ret

Read the value back out of the stack slot and return it.

If you compile this with optimisation, you'll see most of the code vanish. If you use -fomit-frame-pointer -Os, you should end up with this:

max:
    movl    4(%esp), %eax
    incl    %eax
    ret
share|improve this answer
    movl    %eax, -4(%ebp)

Here the value computed for d (now stored in eax) is saved in d's memory cell.

    movl    -4(%ebp), %eax

While here the return value (d's) gets loaded into eax, because, as you know, eax holds functions' return value.
As @David said, you're compiling without optimization, so gcc generates easy-to-debug code, which is quite inefficient and repetitive sometimes.

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